toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Kernbach, M.E.; Newhouse, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Hall, R.J.; Gibbons, J.; Oberstaller, J.; Selechnik, D.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Unnasch, T.R.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Martin, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 286 Issue 1907 Pages 20191051  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; anthropogenic; ecoimmunology; host competence; light pollution; reservoir host  
  Abstract Among the many anthropogenic changes that impact humans and wildlife, one of the most pervasive but least understood is light pollution. Although detrimental physiological and behavioural effects resulting from exposure to light at night are widely appreciated, the impacts of light pollution on infectious disease risk have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that artificial light at night (ALAN) extends the infectious-to-vector period of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), an urban-dwelling avian reservoir host of West Nile virus (WNV). Sparrows exposed to ALAN maintained transmissible viral titres for 2 days longer than controls but did not experience greater WNV-induced mortality during this window. Transcriptionally, ALAN altered the expression of gene regulatory networks including key hubs (OASL, PLBD1 and TRAP1) and effector genes known to affect WNV dissemination (SOCS). Despite mounting anti-viral immune responses earlier, transcriptomic signatures indicated that ALAN-exposed individuals probably experienced pathogen-induced damage and immunopathology, potentially due to evasion of immune effectors. A simple mathematical modelling exercise indicated that ALAN-induced increases of host infectious-to-vector period could increase WNV outbreak potential by approximately 41%. ALAN probably affects other host and vector traits relevant to transmission, and additional research is needed to advise the management of zoonotic diseases in light-polluted areas.  
  Address Center for Global Health Infectious Disease Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31337318; PMCID:PMC6661335 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2611  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Freedman, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Regulation of Mammalian Circadian Behavior by Non-rod, Non-cone, Ocular Photoreceptors Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 284 Issue 5413 Pages 502-504  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 753  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wright, K.P.J.; Hull, J.T.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol  
  Volume (down) 283 Issue 6 Pages R1370-7  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Attention/*physiology; *Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Memory/physiology; Reaction Time; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Wakefulness/physiology; NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology; Non-NASA Center  
  Abstract Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0363-6119 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12388468 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 835  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bullock, B.; McGlashan, E.M.; Burns, A.C.; Lu, B.S.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traits related to bipolar disorder are associated with an increased post-illumination pupil response Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res  
  Volume (down) 278 Issue Pages 35-41  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Mood states in bipolar disorder appear to be closely linked to changes in sleep and circadian function. It has been suggested that hypersensitivity of the circadian system to light may be a trait vulnerability for bipolar disorder. Healthy persons with emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder also appear to exhibit problems with circadian rhythms, which may be associated with individual differences in light sensitivity. This study investigated the melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) in relation to emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder (measured with the General Behavior Inventory) in a non-clinical group (n=61). An increased PIPR was associated with increased bipolar disorder-related traits. Specifically, the hypomania scale of the General Behavior Inventory was associated with an increased post-blue PIPR. Further, both the full hypomania and shortened '7 Up' scales were significantly predicted by PIPR, after age, sex and depressive traits were controlled. These findings suggest that increased sensitivity to light may be a risk factor for mood problems in the general population, and support the idea that hypersensitivity to light is a trait vulnerability for, rather than symptom of, bipolar disorder.  
  Address School of Psychological Sciences and Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: sean.cain@monash.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31136914 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2510  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light exposure at night and sleep quality in bipolar disorder: the APPLE cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders  
  Volume (down) 257 Issue Pages 314-320  
  Keywords Human Health; mood disorders; Bipolar Disorder; Sleep; sleep efficiency; sleep quality  
  Abstract Background

Sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder (BD) is common and is associated with a risk for mood episode recurrence. Thus, it is important to identify factors that are related to sleep disturbance in BD. This cross-sectional study investigated the association between exposure to light at night (LAN) and sleep parameters in patients with BD.

Methods

The sleep parameters of 175 outpatients with BD were recorded using actigraphy at their homes for seven consecutive nights and were evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). The average LAN intensity in the bedroom during bedtime and rising time was measured using a portable photometer, and the participants were divided into two groups: “Light” (≥5 lux) and “Dark” (<5 lux). The association between LAN and sleep parameters was tested with multivariable analysis by adjusting for potential confounder such as age, gender, current smoker, mood state, day length, daytime light exposure, and sedative medications.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounder, the actigraphy sleep parameters showed significantly lower sleep efficiency (mean, 80.1% vs. 83.4%; p = 0.01), longer log-transformed sleep onset latency (2.9 vs. 2.6 min; p = 0.01), and greater wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs. 41.6 min; p = 0.02) in the Light group than in the Dark group. Whereas, there were no significant differences in the ISI scores between the groups.

Limitations

This was a cross-sectional study; therefore, the results do not necessarily imply that LAN causes sleep disturbance.

Conclusions

Reducing LAN exposure may contribute to improved sleep quality in patients with BD.
 
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital, Aichi, Japan; esakiz(at)fujita-hu.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2561  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: