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Author (up) Arendt, J.; Middleton, B.
Title Human seasonal and circadian studies in Antarctica (Halley, 75 degrees S) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication General and Comparative Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Gen Comp Endocrinol
Volume 258 Issue Pages 250-258
Keywords Human Activities; Acclimatization/*physiology; Actigraphy; Adult; Antarctic Regions; Behavior/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Darkness; Female; Heart Rate/physiology; Humans; Libido; Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Photoperiod; *Seasons; Sleep/physiology; Young Adult; *Antarctica; *Circadian; *Light; *Melatonin; *Seasonal
Abstract Living for extended periods in Antarctica exposes base personnel to extremes of daylength (photoperiod) and temperature. At the British Antarctic Survey base of Halley, 75 degrees S, the sun does not rise for 110 d in the winter and does not set for 100 d in summer. Photoperiod is the major time cue governing the timing of seasonal events such as reproduction in many species. The neuroendocrine signal providing photoperiodic information to body physiology is the duration of melatonin secretion which reflects the length of the night: longer in the short days of winter and shorter in summer. Light of sufficient intensity and spectral composition serves to suppress production of melatonin and to set the circadian timing and the duration of the rhythm. In humans early observations suggested that bright (>2000 lux) white light was needed to suppress melatonin completely. Shortly thereafter winter depression (Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD) was described, and its successful treatment by an artificial summer photoperiod of bright white light, sufficient to shorten melatonin production. At Halley dim artificial light intensity during winter was measured, until 2003, at a maximum of approximately 500 lux in winter. Thus a strong seasonal and circadian time cue was absent. It seemed likely that winter depression would be common in the extended period of winter darkness and could be treated with an artificial summer photoperiod. These observations, and predictions, inspired a long series of studies regarding human seasonal and circadian status, and the effects of light treatment, in a small overwintering, isolated community, living in the same conditions for many months at Halley. We found little evidence of SAD, or change in duration of melatonin production with season. However the timing of the melatonin rhythm itself, and/or that of its metabolite 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), was used as a primary marker of seasonal, circadian and treatment changes. A substantial phase delay of melatonin in winter was advanced to summer phase by a two pulse 'skeleton' bright white light treatment. Subsequently a single morning pulse of bright white light was effective with regard to circadian phase and improved daytime performance. The circadian delay evidenced by melatonin was accompanied by delayed sleep (logs and actigraphy): poor sleep is a common complaint in Polar regions. Appropriate extra artificial light, both standard white, and blue enriched, present throughout the day, effectively countered delay in sleep timing and the aMT6s rhythm. The most important factor appeared to be the maximum light experienced. Another manifestation of the winter was a decline in self-rated libido (men only on base at this time). Women on the base showed lower aspects of physical and mental health compared to men. Free-running rhythms were seen in some subjects following night shift, but were rarely found at other times, probably because this base has strongly scheduled activity and leisure time. Complete circadian adaptation during a week of night shift, also seen in a similar situation on North Sea oil rigs, led to problems readapting back to day shift in winter, compared to summer. Here again timed light treatment was used to address the problem. Sleep, alertness and waking performance are critically dependent on optimum circadian phase. Circadian desynchrony is associated with increased risk of major disease in shift workers. These studies provide some groundwork for countering/avoiding circadian desynchrony in rather extreme conditions.
Address Biochemistry and Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Electronic address: b.middleton@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0016-6480 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28526480 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2248
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Author (up) Asher, A.; Shabtay, A.; Brosh, A.; Eitam, H.; Agmon, R.; Cohen-Zinder, M.; Zubidat, A.E.; Haim, A.
Title “Chrono-functional milk”: The difference between melatonin concentrations in night-milk versus day-milk under different night illumination conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 32 Issue 10 Pages 1409-1416
Keywords Animals; Heart rate; illumination; melatonin; night-milk; chronobiology
Abstract Pineal melatonin (MLT) is produced at highest levels during the night, under dark conditions. We evaluated differences in MLT-concentration by comparing daytime versus night time milk samples, from two dairy farms with different night illumination conditions: (1) natural dark (Dark-Night); (2) short wavelength Artificial Light at Night (ALAN, Night-Illuminated). Samples were collected from 14 Israeli Holstein cows from each commercial dairy farm at 04:30 h (“Night-milk”) 12:30 h (“Day-milk”) and analyzed for MLT-concentration. In order to study the effects of night illumination conditions on cows circadian rhythms, Heart Rate (HR) daily rhythms were recorded. MLT-concentrations of Night-milk samples from the dark-night group were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than those of Night-illuminated conditions (30.70 +/- 1.79 and 17.81 +/- 0.33 pg/ml, respectively). Interestingly, night illumination conditions also affected melatonin concentrations at daytime where under Dark-Night conditions values are significantly (p < 0.001) higher than Night-Illuminated conditions, (5.36 +/- 0.33 and 3.30 +/- 0.18 pg/ml, respectively). There were no significant differences between the two treatments in the milk yield and milk composition except somatic cell count (SCC), which was significantly lower (p = 0.02) in the Dark-Night group compared with the Night-Illuminated group. Cows in both groups presented a significant (p < 0.01) HR daily rhythm, therefore we assume that in the night illuminated cows feeding and milking time are the “time keeper”, while in the Dark-night cows, HR rhythms were entrained by the light/dark cycle. The higher MLT-concentration in Dark-night cows with the lower SCC values calls upon farmers to avoid exposure of cows to ALAN. Therefore, under Dark-night conditions milk quality will improve by lowering SCC values where separation between night and day of such milk can produce chrono-functional milk, naturally rich with MLT.
Address b Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology , Faculty of Natural Sciences, The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa , Mount Carmel , Haifa , Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26588495 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1312
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Author (up) Ashkenazi, I. E.; Reinberg, A,; Bicakova-Rocher, A.; Ticher, A.
Title The genetic background of individual variations of circadian-rhythm periods in healthy human adults. Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication American Journal of Human Genetics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages 1250–1259
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature; Bronchi; Bronchi: physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Circadian Rhythm: genetics; Female; Genetic Variation; Hand; Hand: physiology; Heart Rate; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Sex Factors; Sleep
Abstract As a group phenomenon, human variables exhibit a rhythm with a period (tau) equal to 24 h. However, healthy human adults may differ from one another with regard to the persistence of the 24-h periods of a set of variables' rhythms within a given individual. Such an internal desynchronization (or individual circadian dyschronism) was documented during isolation experiments without time cues, both in the present study involving 78 male shift workers and in 20 males and 19 females living in a natural setting. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wake cycles, oral temperature, grip strength of both hands, and heart rate were recorded, and power-spectra analyses of individual time series of about 15 days were used to quantify the rhythm period of each variable. The period of the sleep-wake cycle seldom differed from 24 h, while rhythm periods of the other variables exhibited a trimodal distribution (tau = 24 h, tau > 24 h, tau < 24 h). Among the temperature rhythm periods which were either < 24 h or > 24 h, none was detected between 23.2 and 24 h or between 24 and 24.8 h. Furthermore, the deviations from the 24-h period were predominantly grouped in multiples of +/- 0.8 h. Similar results were obtained when the rhythm periods of hand grip strength were analyzed (for each hand separately). In addition, the distribution of grip strength rhythm periods of the left hand exhibited a gender-related difference. These results suggested the presence of genetically controlled variability. Consequently, the distribution pattern of the periods was analyzed to elucidate its compatibility with a genetic control consisting of either a two-allele system, a multiple-allele system, or a polygenic system. The analysis resulted in structuring a model which integrates the function of a constitutive (essential) gene which produces the exact 24-h period (the Dian domain) with a set of (inducible) polygenes, the alleles of which, contribute identical time entities to the period. The time entities which affected the rhythm periods of the variables examined were in the magnitude of +/- 0.8 h. Such an assembly of genes may create periods ranging from 20 to 28 h (the Circadian domain). The model was termed by us “The Dian-Circadian Model.” This model can also be used to explain the beat phenomena in biological rhythms, the presence of 7-d and 30-d periods, and interindividual differences in sensitivity of rhythm characteristics (phase shifts, synchronization, etc.) to external (and environmental) factors.
Address
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 582
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Author (up) Cajochen, C.; Munch, M.; Kobialka, S.; Krauchi, K.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.; Orgul, S.; Wirz-Justice, A.
Title High sensitivity of human melatonin, alertness, thermoregulation, and heart rate to short wavelength light Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 90 Issue 3 Pages 1311-1316
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature Regulation/physiology/*radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/radiation effects; Color; Heart Rate/physiology/*radiation effects; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells/physiology; Sleep Stages/physiology/radiation effects; Wakefulness/physiology/*radiation effects
Abstract Light can elicit acute physiological and alerting responses in humans, the magnitude of which depends on the timing, intensity, and duration of light exposure. Here, we report that the alerting response of light as well as its effects on thermoregulation and heart rate are also wavelength dependent. Exposure to 2 h of monochromatic light at 460 nm in the late evening induced a significantly greater melatonin suppression than occurred with 550-nm monochromatic light, concomitant with a significantly greater alerting response and increased core body temperature and heart rate ( approximately 2.8 x 10(13) photons/cm(2)/sec for each light treatment). Light diminished the distal-proximal skin temperature gradient, a measure of the degree of vasoconstriction, independent of wavelength. Nonclassical ocular photoreceptors with peak sensitivity around 460 nm have been found to regulate circadian rhythm function as measured by melatonin suppression and phase shifting. Our findings-that the sensitivity of the human alerting response to light and its thermoregulatory sequelae are blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system-indicate an additional role for these novel photoreceptors in modifying human alertness, thermophysiology, and heart rate.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric University Clinic, Wilhelm Kleinstr. 27, CH-4025 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@pukbasel.ch
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15585546 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 728
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Author (up) Kujanik, S.; Mikulecky, M.
Title Circadian and ultradian extrasystole rhythms in healthy individuals at elevated versus lowland altitudes Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 54 Issue 5 Pages 531-538
Keywords Human Health; Acclimatization/physiology; Aged; *Altitude; Anoxia/etiology; Cardiac Complexes, Premature/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Electrocardiography, Ambulatory; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Time Factors
Abstract We defined chronobiologic norms for supraventricular and ventricular single extrasystoles (SV and VE, respectively) in healthy older males in lowland areas. The study was extended to higher altitudes, where hypobaric hypoxia was expected to increase extrasystole frequency, while perhaps not changing rhythmicity. In healthy men (lowland n = 37, altitude n = 22), aged 49-72 years, mean numbers of SVs and VEs were counted over a 24-h period. Cosinor regression was used to test the 24-h rhythm and its 2nd-10th harmonics. The resulting approximating function for either extrasystole type includes its point, 95% confidence interval of the mean, and 95% tolerance for single measurement estimates. Separate hourly differences (delta) between altitude and lowland (n = 59) were also analysed. Hourly means were significantly higher in the mountains versus lowland, by +0.8 beats/h on average for SVs, and by +0.9 beats/h for VEs. A relatively rich chronogram for VEs in mountains versus lowland exists. Delta VEs clearly display a 24-h component and its 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 7th harmonics. This results in significantly higher accumulation of VEs around 8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m. in the mountains. The increase in extrasystole occurrence in the mountains is probably caused by higher hypobaric hypoxia and resulting sympathetic drive. Healthy men at elevated altitudes show circadian and several ultradian rhythms of single VEs dependent on the hypoxia level. This new methodological approach--evaluating the differences between two locations using delta values--promises to provide deeper insight into the occurrence of premature beats.
Address Dept of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Trieda SNP 1, 040 66 Kosice, Slovak Republic. stefan.kujanik@upjs.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20195873 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 774
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