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Author (up) Ball, L.J.; Palesh, O.; Kriegsfeld, L.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Pathophysiologic Role of Disrupted Circadian and Neuroendocrine Rhythms in Breast Carcinogenesis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Endocrine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Endocrine Reviews  
  Volume Issue Pages er.2015-1133  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most physiological processes in the brain and body exhibit daily (circadian) rhythms coordinated by an endogenous master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus that are essential for normal health and functioning. Exposure to sunlight during the day and darkness at night optimally entrains biological rhythms to promote homeostasis and human health. Unfortunately, a major consequence of the modern lifestyle is increased exposure to sun-free environments during the day and artificial lighting at night. Additionally, behavioral disruptions to circadian rhythms (i.e., repeated transmeridian flights, night or rotating shift work, or sleep disturbances) have a profound influence on health and have been linked to a number of pathological conditions, including endocrine-dependent cancers. Specifically, night shift work has been identified as a significant risk factor for breast cancer in industrialized countries. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which shift-work-induced circadian disruptions promote cancer. In this review, we examine the importance of the brain-body link through which circadian disruptions contribute to endocrine-dependent diseases, including breast carcinogenesis, by negatively impacting neuroendocrine and neuroimmune cells and consider preventive measures directed at maximizing circadian health.  
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  ISSN 0163-769X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1496  
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Author (up) Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S. url  doi
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  Title Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1503-1506  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.  
  Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184  
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Author (up) Bashiri, F.; Hassan, C.R.C. doi  openurl
  Title Light Pollution and Its Effect on the Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Fundamental Phys. Sci.  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 8-12  
  Keywords Light pollution, human health, animal behaviour, plant growth  
  Abstract Light pollution can cause disturbance to humans as well as animals. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of light pollution on human's health, plants, animals, human body and People’s attitude about light pollution. About 90% of people strongly agreed that excessive lighting has adverse effects on a person's health. At least, 70% of people had difficulty in sleeping because of light pollution. Most of people believed that video Billboards, Spotlights, Car headlights and Street lights are the most important source of light pollution and about 60% of people agree that light pollution can affect animal’s sleep. 60% of people believed that excessive artificial light can attract several kinks of birds and insects. The results of this study indicate that the human health, plants growth and animal behaviour are strongly affected by the light pollution.‎  
  Address Faculty of Engineering University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 313  
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Author (up) Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu  
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  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718  
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
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  Title Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e1017  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
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  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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