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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review  
  Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.  
  Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112  
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Author Tarquini, R.; Carbone, A.; Martinez, M.; Mazzoccoli, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daylight saving time and circadian rhythms in the neuro-endocrine-immune system: impact on cardiovascular health Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Internal and Emergency Medicine Abbreviated Journal Intern Emerg Med  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Division of Internal Medicine and Laboratory of Chronobiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Fondazione IRCCS “Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza”, Cappuccini Avenue, San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, 71013, Italy. g.mazzoccoli@operapadrepio.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1828-0447 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30488154 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2121  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dunster, G.P.; de la Iglesia, L.; Ben-Hamo, M.; Nave, C.; Fleischer, J.G.; Panda, S.; de la Iglesia, H.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepmore in Seattle: Later school start times are associated with more sleep and better performance in high school students Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci. Adv.  
  Volume 4 Issue 12 Pages eaau6200  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most teenagers are chronically sleep deprived. One strategy proposed to lengthen adolescent sleep is to delay secondary school start times. This would allow students to wake up later without shifting their bedtime, which is biologically determined by the circadian clock, resulting in a net increase in sleep. So far, there is no objective quantitative data showing that a single intervention such as delaying the school start time significantly increases daily sleep. The Seattle School District delayed the secondary school start time by nearly an hour. We carried out a pre-/post-research study and show that there was an increase in the daily median sleep duration of 34 min, associated with a 4.5% increase in the median grades of the students and an improvement in attendance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Masri, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emerging link between cancer, metabolism, and circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Medicine Abbreviated Journal Nat Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 12 Pages 1795-1803  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a complex cellular mechanism that, through the control of diverse metabolic and gene expression pathways, governs a large array of cyclic physiological processes. Epidemiological and clinical data reveal a connection between the disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer that is supported by recent preclinical data. In addition, results from animal models and molecular studies underscore emerging links between cancer metabolism and the circadian clock. This has implications for therapeutic approaches, and we discuss the possible design of chronopharmacological strategies.  
  Address Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, INSERM U1233, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. psc@uci.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-8956 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30523327 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2135  
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