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Author Ashkenazi, I. E.; Reinberg, A,; Bicakova-Rocher, A.; Ticher, A.
Title The genetic background of individual variations of circadian-rhythm periods in healthy human adults. Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication American Journal of Human Genetics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages 1250–1259
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature; Bronchi; Bronchi: physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Circadian Rhythm: genetics; Female; Genetic Variation; Hand; Hand: physiology; Heart Rate; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Sex Factors; Sleep
Abstract As a group phenomenon, human variables exhibit a rhythm with a period (tau) equal to 24 h. However, healthy human adults may differ from one another with regard to the persistence of the 24-h periods of a set of variables' rhythms within a given individual. Such an internal desynchronization (or individual circadian dyschronism) was documented during isolation experiments without time cues, both in the present study involving 78 male shift workers and in 20 males and 19 females living in a natural setting. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wake cycles, oral temperature, grip strength of both hands, and heart rate were recorded, and power-spectra analyses of individual time series of about 15 days were used to quantify the rhythm period of each variable. The period of the sleep-wake cycle seldom differed from 24 h, while rhythm periods of the other variables exhibited a trimodal distribution (tau = 24 h, tau > 24 h, tau < 24 h). Among the temperature rhythm periods which were either < 24 h or > 24 h, none was detected between 23.2 and 24 h or between 24 and 24.8 h. Furthermore, the deviations from the 24-h period were predominantly grouped in multiples of +/- 0.8 h. Similar results were obtained when the rhythm periods of hand grip strength were analyzed (for each hand separately). In addition, the distribution of grip strength rhythm periods of the left hand exhibited a gender-related difference. These results suggested the presence of genetically controlled variability. Consequently, the distribution pattern of the periods was analyzed to elucidate its compatibility with a genetic control consisting of either a two-allele system, a multiple-allele system, or a polygenic system. The analysis resulted in structuring a model which integrates the function of a constitutive (essential) gene which produces the exact 24-h period (the Dian domain) with a set of (inducible) polygenes, the alleles of which, contribute identical time entities to the period. The time entities which affected the rhythm periods of the variables examined were in the magnitude of +/- 0.8 h. Such an assembly of genes may create periods ranging from 20 to 28 h (the Circadian domain). The model was termed by us “The Dian-Circadian Model.” This model can also be used to explain the beat phenomena in biological rhythms, the presence of 7-d and 30-d periods, and interindividual differences in sensitivity of rhythm characteristics (phase shifts, synchronization, etc.) to external (and environmental) factors.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 582
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Author Atkinson, G.; Davenne, D.
Title Relationships between sleep, physical activity and human health Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 90 Issue 2-3 Pages 229-235
Keywords Human Health; Activity Cycles/*physiology; Animals; Body Temperature/physiology; Exercise/*physiology; Health; Humans; Motor Activity/physiology; Pineal Gland/physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Wakefulness/physiology
Abstract Although sleep and exercise may seem to be mediated by completely different physiological mechanisms, there is growing evidence for clinically important relationships between these two behaviors. It is known that passive body heating facilitates the nocturnal sleep of healthy elderly people with insomnia. This finding supports the hypothesis that changes in body temperature trigger somnogenic brain areas to initiate sleep. Nevertheless, little is known about how the core and distal thermoregulatory responses to exercise fit into this hypothesis. Such knowledge could also help in reducing sleep problems associated with nocturnal shiftwork. It is difficult to incorporate physical activity into a shiftworker's lifestyle, since it is already disrupted in terms of family commitments and eating habits. A multi-research strategy is needed to identify what the optimal amounts and timing of physical activity are for reducing shiftwork-related sleep problems. The relationships between sleep, exercise and diet are also important, given the recently reported associations between short sleep length and obesity. The cardiovascular safety of exercise timing should also be considered, since recent data suggest that the reactivity of blood pressure to a change in general physical activity is highest during the morning. This time is associated with an increased risk in general of a sudden cardiac event, but more research work is needed to separate the influences of light, posture and exercise per se on the haemodynamic responses to sleep and physical activity following sleep taken at night and during the day as a nap.
Address Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Henry Cotton Campus, Webster Street, Liverpool L3 2ET, UK. G.Atkinson@ljmu.ac.uk
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ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:17067643; PMCID:PMC2782301 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 717
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Author Ayaki, M.; Hattori, A.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakano, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Negishi, K.; Tsubota, K.
Title Protective effect of blue-light shield eyewear for adults against light pollution from self-luminous devices used at night Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 134-139
Keywords Human health
Abstract We investigated sleep quality and melatonin in 12 adults who wore blue-light shield or control eyewear 2 hours before sleep while using a self-luminous portable device, and assessed visual quality for the two eyewear types. Overnight melatonin secretion was significantly higher after using the blue-light shield (P < 0.05) than with the control eyewear. Sleep efficacy and sleep latency were significantly superior for wearers of the blue-light shield (P < 0.05 for both), and this group reported greater sleepiness during portable device use compared to those using the control eyewear. Participants rated the blue-light shield as providing acceptable visual quality.
Address a Department of Ophthalmology , Keio University School of Medicine , Shinjuku , Tokyo , Japan
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:26730983 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1330
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Author Babaii, A., Adib-Hajbaghery, M., & Hajibagheri, A.
Title Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Nursing and Midwifery Studies Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND:

Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit.

OBJECTIVES:

This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests.

RESULTS:

After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients' sleep quality.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2303
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Author Bagci, S.; Sabir, H.; Muller, A.; Reiter, R.J.
Title Effects of altered photoperiod due to COVID-19 lockdown on pregnant women and their fetuses Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health; Covid-19; circadian disruption; fetus; lockdown; melatonin; pregnant Women
Abstract Maternal circadian rhythms provide highly important input into the entrainment and programming of fetal and newborn circadian rhythms. The light-dark cycle is an important regulator of the internal biological clock. Even though pregnant women spend a greater part of the day at home during the latter stages of pregnancy, natural light exposure is crucial for the fetus. The current recommended COVID-19 lockdown might dramatically alter normal environmental lighting conditions of pregnant women, resulting in exposure to extremely low levels of natural daylight and high-intensity artificial light sources during both day and night. This article summarizes the potential effects on pregnant woman and their fetuses due to prolonged exposure to altered photoperiod and as consequence altered circadian system, known as chronodisruption, that may result from the COVID-19 lockdown.
Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health San Antonio , San Antonio, Texas, USA
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32519912 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3007
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