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Author Bercz, P.A.; Jaffe, F.
Title Adverse health effects of shift work and shift work sleep disorder Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Dialogue and Diagnosis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 2 Issue Pages 13-20
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 506
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Author Berson, D.M.; Dunn, F.A.; Takao, M.
Title Phototransduction by retinal ganglion cells that set the circadian clock Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 295 Issue 5557 Pages 1070-1073
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Axons/ultrastructure; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Dendrites/ultrastructure; Isoquinolines; Kinetics; Light; *Light Signal Transduction; Patch-Clamp Techniques; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Retinal Ganglion Cells/chemistry/cytology/*physiology; Rod Opsins/analysis/physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/cytology/*physiology
Abstract Light synchronizes mammalian circadian rhythms with environmental time by modulating retinal input to the circadian pacemaker-the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Such photic entrainment requires neither rods nor cones, the only known retinal photoreceptors. Here, we show that retinal ganglion cells innervating the SCN are intrinsically photosensitive. Unlike other ganglion cells, they depolarized in response to light even when all synaptic input from rods and cones was blocked. The sensitivity, spectral tuning, and slow kinetics of this light response matched those of the photic entrainment mechanism, suggesting that these ganglion cells may be the primary photoreceptors for this system.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, RI, 02912 USA. David_Berson@brown.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:11834835 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 720
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Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.; Ferrari, M.J.; Grais, R.F.; Djibo, A.; Grenfell, B.T.
Title Explaining seasonal fluctuations of measles in Niger using nighttime lights imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1424-1427
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Cities; Emigration and Immigration; Epidemics; *Epidemiologic Methods; Humans; Light; Measles/*epidemiology/transmission; Niger/epidemiology; *Population Density; Remote Sensing Technology; *Seasons; Spacecraft
Abstract Measles epidemics in West Africa cause a significant proportion of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. Epidemics are strongly seasonal, but the drivers of these fluctuations are poorly understood, which limits the predictability of outbreaks and the dynamic response to immunization. We show that measles seasonality can be explained by spatiotemporal changes in population density, which we measure by quantifying anthropogenic light from satellite imagery. We find that measles transmission and population density are highly correlated for three cities in Niger. With dynamic epidemic models, we demonstrate that measures of population density are essential for predicting epidemic progression at the city level and improving intervention strategies. In addition to epidemiological applications, the ability to measure fine-scale changes in population density has implications for public health, crisis management, and economic development.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. nbharti@princeton.edu
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22158822; PMCID:PMC3891598 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2770
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Author Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S.
Title Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol
Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.
Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507
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Author Bierman, A.; Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S.
Title Measuring and predicting eyelid spectral transmittance Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Biomedical Optics Abbreviated Journal J Biomed Opt
Volume 16 Issue 6 Pages 067011
Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health
Abstract The purpose of the present study was to objectively quantify the spectral transmittance of the eyelid. Reported here are data acquired using a technique that was developed to provide practical and accurate measurements of eyelid transmittance across the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The empirical data were analyzed in terms of the absorption and scattering characteristics of the constituents of skin to develop a method for predicting eyelid transmission. Results showed that the eyelid has a much higher optical density at short wavelengths than previously published. The mean +/- standard deviation (s.d.) optical density of the eyelid from 450 to 650 nm was 2.1 +/- 0.3 with an optical density range among subjects of approximately 1.0. The study results indicate that skin pigmentation is poorly correlated with eyelid transmission; eyelid transmission is most affected by wavelength-independent macromolecules in the eyelid as well as its overall thickness.
Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lighting Research Center, 21 Union Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1083-3668 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21721832 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1530
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