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Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e1017  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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Author Benedetto, M.M.; Contin, M.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Oxidative Stress in Retinal Degeneration Promoted by Constant LED Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front. Cell. Neurosci.  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract Light pollution by artificial light, might accelerate retinal diseases and circadian asynchrony. The excess of light exposure is a growing problem in societies, so studies on the consequences of long-term exposure to low levels of light are needed to determine the effects on vision. The possibility to understand the molecular mechanisms of light damage will contribute to the knowledge about visual disorders related to defects in the phototransduction. Several animal models have been used to study retinal degeneration (RD) by light; however, some important aspects remain to be established. Previously, we demonstrated that cool white treatment of 200 lux light-emitting diode (LED) induces retinal transformation with rods and cones cell death and significant changes in opsin expression in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Therefore, to further develop describing the molecular pathways of RD, we have examined here the oxidative stress and the fatty acid composition in rat retinas maintained at constant light. We demonstrated the existence of oxidative reactions after 5 days in outer nuclear layer (ONL), corresponding to classical photoreceptors; catalase (CAT) enzyme activity did not show significant differences in all times studied and the fatty acid study showed that docosahexaenoic acid decreased after 4 days. Remarkably, the docosahexaenoic acid diminution showed a correlation with the rise in stearic acid indicating a possible association between them. We assumed that the reduction in docosahexaenoic acid may be affected by the oxidative stress in photoreceptors outer segment which in turn affects the stearic acid composition with consequences in the membrane properties. All these miss-regulation affects the photoreceptor survival through unknown mechanisms involved. We consider that oxidative stress might be one of the pathways implicated in RD promoted by light.  
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  ISSN 1662-5102 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2333  
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Author Benke, K.E.; Benke, K.K.; Dimitriadis, C. url  openurl
  Title Spectral content of artificial lighting and effects on health. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages 13-15  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract There is an increasing body of evidence indicating possible health effects from prolonged exposure to artificial lighting after dark. Both compact fluorescent lights and light emitting diode lamps have a greater proportion of blue light in the emission spectrum than the older incandescent light sources. Exposure to the blue light component at night has been the subject of ongoing research, with a number of published studies linking blue light content to the disruption of the internal body clock, suppression of melatonin production and various ocular effects. Aside from short-term discomfort, possible health effects include long-term chronic illnesses, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A brief review of recent research is provided, salient health issues are noted and discussed, and some examples of exposure minimisation strategies are suggested.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 520  
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Author Benot, S.; R. Goberna; R. J. Reiter; S. Garcia-Mauriño; C. Osuna; J. M. Guerrero url  openurl
  Title Physiological levels of melatonin contribute to the antioxidant capacity of human serum Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue Pages 59-64  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract This work evaluates whether physiological concentrations of the pineal secretory product melatonin contribute to the total antioxidant status (TAS) of human serum. Day and nighttime serum samples were collected from healthy volunteers ranging from 2 to 89 years of age and used to measure melatonin and TAS. Results showed that both melatonin and TAS in human serum exhibited 24 hr variations with nocturnal peak values at 01:00 hr. Moreover, exposure of volunteers to light at night resulted in clear decreases of both TAS and melatonin. Furthermore, when melatonin was removed from sera collected at night, the TAS value of the sample was reduced to basal daytime values. In aging studies, it was found that nocturnal serum values of TAS and melatonin exhibited maximal values during the first four decades; thereafter, these values decreased as age advanced. In 60-year-old individuals, day/night differences in serum melatonin and TAS levels were clearly diminished, by more than 80%, with these differences being completely abolished in older individuals. Our results suggest that melatonin contributes to the total antioxidative capability of human serum. This antioxidant contribution of melatonin is reduced as age advances correlating with the age-related reduction of melatonin.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 719  
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