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Author Dhaliwal, S.S.; Keller, J.; Le, H.-N.; Lewin, D.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Disturbance among Pregnant Women: The Influence of Environmental and Contextual Factors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A270-A271  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction

Disrupted sleep during pregnancy affects nearly 85% of women. This can contribute to psychological distress and antenatal depression. The aims of the current project were to test whether (a) poorer subjective sleep quality contributed to greater depression and anxiety symptoms, and (b) contextual factors predicted clinically significant sleep disturbance after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods

In a mixed-methods study, 418 pregnant women (age: M=32.4 years; gestation: M=28.4 weeks, SD=8.4 weeks; 58% Black) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), measures of pregnancy-related physiological factors, and provided details about their sleep environment. They also rated perinatal depression, anxiety, and SES (Hollingshead and MacArthur Ladder). Sixty-two women completed these measures again later in pregnancy (gestation M = 34.2 weeks). A subset of seven women underwent actigraphy (9-nights) during their third trimester. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, BMI, race, sleep disordered breathing, and gestational week.

Results

Subjective sleep quality was significantly poorer among Black women and those with higher BMI. Physiological factors (i.e., restless leg syndrome, nocturnal urination, and acid reflux) explained subjective sleep disturbance after accounting for gestational week (ps<.01). Among women with history of psychopathology (n=221), sleep disturbance was significantly related to anxiety and depression symptoms (ps<.01), with greater sleep disturbance (PSQI score >5) predicting clinically significant antenatal depression (B = .38, p<.05). However, those who rated their social standing as higher reported lower sleep disturbance throughout pregnancy, even after adjusting for mood and anxiety (B= .86, SE =.41; p<.05). There was a dose-response positive association between sleep disturbance and depression severity among Black women only (B = .89; p<.05). Among lower SES Black women, environmental factors (greater ambient noise and light pollution) partially mediated this effect (B= .45, SE =.17; p<.01).

Conclusion

Sociocontextual factors may explain sleep disturbance severity among low-income pregnant Black women, above and beyond traditional metrics of SES. Higher subjective SES may be protective against sleep disturbance and psychiatric distress. Assessments of sleep during pregnancy should account for physiological considerations and environmental disruptions, alongside mood and anxiety.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2323  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dickerman, B.; Liu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does current scientific evidence support a link between light at night and breast cancer among female night-shift nurses? Review of evidence and implications for occupational and environmental health nurses Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Workplace Health & Safety Abbreviated Journal Workplace Health Saf  
  Volume 60 Issue 6 Pages 273-81; quiz 282  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/nursing; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology/nursing; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Environmental Health; Evidence-Based Nursing; Female; Humans; Light; Night Care/*statistics & numerical data; *Occupational Health Nursing; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract Breast cancer is increasingly prevalent in industrialized regions of the world, and exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a potential risk factor. Epidemiological observations have documented an increased breast cancer risk among female night-shift workers, and strong experimental evidence for this relationship has also been found in rodent models. Indirect support for the LAN hypothesis comes from studies involving blind women, sleep duration, bedroom light levels, and community nighttime light levels. This article reviews the literature, discusses possible mechanisms of action, and provides recommendations for occupational health nursing research, practice, and education. Research is needed to further explore the relationship between exposure to LAN and breast cancer risk and elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship before interventions can be designed for prevention and mitigation of breast cancer.  
  Address MultiCare Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup, WA, USA. barbra.dickerman@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2165-0799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22658734 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 512  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dong, K.; Goyarts, E.C.; Pelle, E.; Trivero, J.; Pernodet, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue Light disrupts the circadian rhythm and create damage in skin cells Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Cosmetic Science Abbreviated Journal Int J Cosmet Sci  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 558-562  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian disruption; Skin; Clock genes  
  Abstract On a daily basis, the skin is exposed to many environmental stressors and insults. Over a 24-hr natural cycle, during the day, the skin is focused on protection; while at night, the skin is focused on repairing damage that occurred during daytime and getting ready for the next morning. Circadian rhythm provides the precise timing mechanism for engaging those different pathways necessary to keep a healthy skin through clock genes that are present in all skin cells. The strongest clue for determining cellular functions timing is through sensing light or absence of light (darkness). Here, we asked the question if blue light could be a direct entrainment signal to skin cells and also disrupt their circadian rhythm at night. Through a reporter assay for per1 transcription, we demonstrate that blue light at 410nm decreases per1 transcription in keratinocytes, showing that epidermal skin cells can sense light directly and control their own clock gene expression. This triggers cells to “think” it is daytime even at nighttime. Elsewhere, we measured different skin cell damage due to blue light exposure (at different doses and times of exposure) versus cells that were kept in full darkness. We show an increase of ROS production, DNA damage and inflammatory mediators. These deleterious effects can potentially increase overall skin damage over time and ultimately accelerates aging.  
  Address Materials Science & Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0142-5463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31418890 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Donker, D. W. url  openurl
  Title Light and noise nuisance … deciphered yet underappreciated ‘Rosetta Stone’ of the modern ICU? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Netherlands Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 144  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health; hospitals; Department of Intensive Care Unit; health care  
  Abstract In everyday life, we take for granted that public authorities protect us from an unhealthy environment, including light and noise pollution. In recent years, about 1200 kilometres of noise barriers have been built alongside Dutch highways with costs approaching a billion euros. Also, more than 50 cities in the Netherlands have successfully taken initiatives to reduce the artificial light pollution in the past six years, as our country is well known to rank among the literally most illuminated ones in the world. These investments seem to be reasonable as adverse health effects from environmental light and noise pollution have long and widely been recognised. How these potentially detrimental effects of artificial light and distressing noise acting on the human body translate into the best possible care that we strive to provide within our modern ICU environment is an area of increasing professional awareness, interest and research. Yet, we all realise that not only light and noise, but numerous physical and psychological stressors may negatively affect individual ICU patients. Also, the impact of these factors may vary considerably among individuals, which makes it even more difficult for caregivers to prioritise among apparently competing aspects of care in their daily practice. A comprehensive, narrative review by Koen Simons and colleagues in this issue of the Netherlands Journal of Critical Care provides us with up-to-date information on the ‘impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients’.Here, we gain more insights and learn how a multimodal approach to our ICU environment may aid to optimise light exposure and reduce noise. This may not only improve our patients’ sleep and general wellbeing, but also

reduce the incidence of delirium. The latter seems especially relevant since the pharmacological prevention of delirium has repeatedly been shown to be disappointing, as recently confirmed again in a large Dutch trial. All this evidence sets the stage to further promote nonpharmacological interventions in the ICU to prevent delirium. Therefore, we should do our best to limit controllable stressors in the ICU in order to improve patient comfort and hopefully enhance the individual prognosis. As our traditional focus on the medical and technical aspects of critical care has led us to asymptotically reach current therapeutic optima; human factors and soft skills are no longer far in the horizon of the modern ICU.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NJCC Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2625  
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Author Downie, L.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue-light filtering ophthalmic lenses: to prescribe, or not to prescribe? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics : the Journal of the British College of Ophthalmic Opticians (Optometrists) Abbreviated Journal Ophthalmic Physiol Opt  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 640-643  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose

Blue-blocking (BB) spectacle lenses, which attenuate short-wavelength light, are being marketed to alleviate eyestrain and discomfort when using digital devices, improve sleep quality and potentially confer protection from retinal phototoxicity. The aim of this review was to investigate the relative benefits and potential harms of these lenses.

Methods

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), recruiting adults from the general population, which investigated the effect of BB spectacle lenses on visual performance, symptoms of eyestrain or eye fatigue, changes to macular integrity and subjective sleep quality. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and clinical trial registers, until 30 April 2017. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool.

Results

Three studies (with 136 participants) met our inclusion criteria; these had limitations in study design and/or implementation. One study compared the effect of BB lenses with clear lenses on contrast sensitivity (CS) and colour vision (CV) using a pseudo-RCT crossover design; there was no observed difference between lens types (log CS; Mean Difference (MD) = &#8722;0.01 [&#8722;0.03, 0.01], CV total error score on 100-hue; MD = 1.30 [&#8722;7.84, 10.44]). Another study measured critical fusion frequency (CFF), as a proxy for eye fatigue, on wearers of low and high BB lenses, pre- and post- a two-hour computer task. There was no observed difference between low BB and standard lens groups, but there was a less negative change in CFF between the high and low BB groups (MD = 1.81 [0.57, 3.05]). Both studies compared eyestrain symptoms with Likert scales. There was no evidence of inter-group differences for either low BB (MD = 0.00 [&#8722;0.22, 0.22]) or high BB lenses (MD = &#8722;0.05 [&#8722;0.31, 0.21]), nor evidence of a difference in the proportion of participants showing an improvement in symptoms of eyestrain or eye fatigue. One study reported a small improvement in sleep quality in people with self-reported insomnia after wearing high compared to low-BB lenses (MD = 0.80 [0.17, 1.43]) using a 10-point Likert scale. A study involving normal participants found no observed difference in sleep quality. We found no studies investigating effects on macular structure or function.

Conclusions

We find a lack of high quality evidence to support using BB spectacle lenses for the general population to improve visual performance or sleep quality, alleviate eye fatigue or conserve macular health.
 
  Address Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0275-5408 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29044667 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1774  
Permanent link to this record
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