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Author Zhao, Z., Zhou, Y., Tan, G., & Li, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1999-2003  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract In recent years, people have become increasingly attentive to light pollution influences on their eyes. In the visible spectrum, short-wave blue light with wavelength between 415 nm and 455 nm is closely related to eye light damage. This high energy blue light passes through the cornea and lens to the retina causing diseases such as dry eye, cataract, age-related macular degeneration, even stimulating the brain, inhibiting melatonin secretion, and enhancing adrenocortical hormone production, which will destroy the hormonal balance and directly affect sleep quality. Therefore, the effect of Blu-rays on ocular is becoming an important concern for the future. We describe blue light's effects on eye tissues, summarize the research on eye injury and its physical prevention and medical treatment.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2313  
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Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor Artificial Nighttime Light and Use of Hypnotic Medications in Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm  
  Volume 14 Issue 11 Pages (down) 1903-1910  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Study Objectives

Outdoor artificial nighttime light is increasingly recognized as a form of environmental pollution. Excessive nighttime light exposure, whether from indoor or outdoor sources, has been associated with a number of deleterious effects on human health. We performed a population-based cohort study in South Korea to assess the possible association between outdoor nocturnal lighting and insomnia in older adults, as measured by prescriptions for hypnotic drugs.

Methods

This study used data from the 2002–2013 National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), and a total of 52,027 adults who were age 60 years or older were included in the study. Light data were based on satellite mapping of artificial light. The usage data of two hypnotic drugs, zolpidem (N05CF02) and triazolam (N05CD05), were extracted from the NHIS-NSC records.

Results

Of the 52,027 patients in this cohort, 11,738 (22%) had prescriptions for hypnotic drugs. Increasing outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure (stratified by quartile) was associated with an increased prevalence of hypnotic prescriptions and daily dose intake. Compared with individuals in the lowest quartile 1, the regression coefficients for prescription days and daily defined doses of all hypnotic drugs and certain hypotonic drugs were significantly higher among those living in areas with higher outdoor artificial nighttime light (quartiles 2 through 4).

Conclusions

Outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure was significantly associated with prescription of hypnotic drugs in older adults. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that outdoor artificial nighttime light may cause sleep disturbances.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2060  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stern, M.; Broja, M.; Sansone, R.; Grone, M.; Skene, S.S.; Liebmann, J.; Suschek, C.V.; Born, M.; Kelm, M.; Heiss, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light exposure decreases systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and improves endothelial function in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 25 Issue 17 Pages (down) 1875-1883  
  Keywords Human Health; Blue light; blood pressure; endothelial function; forearm blood flow; pulse wave velocity  
  Abstract AIMS: Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet light can lead to the release of nitric oxide from the skin and decrease blood pressure. In contrast to visible light the local application of ultraviolet light bears a cancerogenic risk. Here, we investigated whether whole body exposure to visible blue light can also decrease blood pressure and increase endothelial function in healthy subjects. METHODS: In a randomised crossover study, 14 healthy male subjects were exposed on 2 days to monochromatic blue light or blue light with a filter foil (control light) over 30 minutes. We measured blood pressure (primary endpoint), heart rate, forearm vascular resistance, forearm blood flow, endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), pulse wave velocity and plasma nitric oxide species, nitrite and nitroso compounds (secondary endpoints) during and up to 2 hours after exposure. RESULTS: Blue light exposure significantly decreased systolic blood pressure and increased heart rate as compared to control. In parallel, blue light significantly increased forearm blood flow, flow-mediated dilation, circulating nitric oxide species and nitroso compounds while it decreased forearm vascular resistance and pulse wave velocity. CONCLUSION: Whole body irradiation with visible blue light at real world doses improves blood pressure, endothelial function and arterial stiffness by nitric oxide released from photolabile intracutanous nitric oxide metabolites into circulating blood.  
  Address Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Email: c.heiss(at)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30196723 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2157  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yates, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspective: The Long-Term Effects of Light Exposure on Establishment of Newborn Circadian Rhythm Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm  
  Volume 14 Issue 10 Pages (down) 1829-1830  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract Development of newborns continues postnatally. Evidence has accumulated on the early life programming effects of light exposure on the maturing visual axis and the developing circadian rhythm. Consideration of the effects of light at night and insufficient light during the day should occur when giving anticipatory guidance in the care of newborn infants. Long-term health consequences of light imprinting may occur with inappropriate light-dark environments during the newborn period.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2032  
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Author Masri, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emerging link between cancer, metabolism, and circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Medicine Abbreviated Journal Nat Med  
  Volume 24 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1795-1803  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a complex cellular mechanism that, through the control of diverse metabolic and gene expression pathways, governs a large array of cyclic physiological processes. Epidemiological and clinical data reveal a connection between the disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer that is supported by recent preclinical data. In addition, results from animal models and molecular studies underscore emerging links between cancer metabolism and the circadian clock. This has implications for therapeutic approaches, and we discuss the possible design of chronopharmacological strategies.  
  Address Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, INSERM U1233, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. psc@uci.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-8956 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30523327 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2135  
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