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Author Shen, J.; Tower, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light on aging and longevity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ageing Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Ageing Res Rev  
  Volume 53 Issue Pages (down) 100913  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; Aging; longevity  
  Abstract Increasing evidence suggests an important role for light in regulation of aging and longevity. UV radiation is a mutagen that can promote aging and decrease longevity. In contrast, NIR light has shown protective effects in animal disease models. In invertebrates, visible light can shorten or extend lifespan, depending on the intensity and wavelength composition. Visible light also impacts human health, including retina function, sleep, cancer and psychiatric disorders. Possible mechanisms of visible light include: controlling circadian rhythms, inducing oxidative stress, and acting through the retina to affect neuronal circuits and systems. Changes in artificial lighting (e.g., LEDs) may have implications for human health. It will be important to further explore the mechanisms of how light affects aging and longevity, and how light affects human health.  
  Address Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA 90089-2910, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1568-1637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31154014 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2514  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mortazavi, S.A.R.; Faraz, M.; Laalpour, S.; Kaveh Ahangar, A.; Eslami, J.; Zarei, S.; Mortazavi, G.; Gheisari, F.; Mortazavi, S.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to Blue Light Emitted from Smartphones in an Environment with Dim Light at Night Alters the Reaction Time of University Students Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Shiraz E-Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Shiraz E-Med J  
  Volume Issue Pages (down) e88230  
  Keywords Human Health; Blue light; smartphone; Reaction Time; shift work  
  Abstract Background: Substantial evidence now indicates that exposure to visible light at night can be linked to a wide spectrum of disorders ranging from obesity to cancer. More specifically, it has been shown that exposure to short wavelengths in the blue region at night is associated with adverse health effects, such as sleep problems.

Objectives: This study aimed at investigating if exposure to blue light emitted from common smartphones in an environment with dim light at night alters human reaction time.

Methods: Visual reaction time (VRT) of 267 male and female university students were recorded using a simple blind computer-assisted VRT test, respectively. Volunteer university students, who provided their informed consent were randomly divided to two groups of control (N = 126 students) and intervention (N = 141 students). All participants were asked to go to bed at 23:00. Participants in the intervention group were asked to use their smartphones from 23:00 to 24:00 (watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes), while the control group only stayed in bed under low lighting condition, i.e. dim light. Before starting the experiment and after 60 minutes of smartphone use, reaction time was recorded in both groups.

Results: The mean reaction times in the intervention and the control groups before the experiment (23:00) did not show a statistically difference (P = 0.449). The reaction time in the intervention group significantly increased from 412.64 ± 105.60 msec at 23:00 to 441.66 ± 125.78 msec at 24:00 (P = 0.0368) while in the control group, there was no statistically significant difference between the mean reaction times at 23:00 and 24:00.

Conclusions: To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study, which showed that exposure to blue-rich visible light emitted from widely used smartphones increases visual reaction time, which would eventually result in a delay in human responses to different hazards. These findings indicate that people, such as night shift or on call workers, who need to react to stresses rapidly should avoid using their smartphones in a dim light at night.
 
  Address Student Research Committee, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1735-1391 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2534  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author James, P.; Bertrand, K.A.; Hart, J.E.; Schernhammer, E.S.; Tamimi, R.M.; Laden, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor Light at Night and Breast Cancer Incidence in the Nurses' Health Study II Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 125 Issue 8 Pages (down) 087010  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Animal and epidemiologic studies suggest that exposure to light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian patterns and decrease nocturnal secretion of melatonin, which may disturb estrogen regulation, leading to increased breast cancer risk. OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer incidence using data from the nationwide U.S.-based Nurses' Health Study II cohort. METHODS: We followed 109,672 women from 1989 through 2013. Cumulative LAN exposure was estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent nighttime illumination at approximately 1 km(2) scale for each residence during follow-up. Incident invasive breast cancer cases were confirmed by medical record review. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for anthropometric, reproductive, lifestyle, and socioeconomic risk factors. RESULTS: Over 2,187,425 person-years, we identified 3,549 incident breast cancer cases. Based on a fully adjusted model, the estimated HR for incident breast cancer with an interquartile range (IQR) (31.6 nW/cm(2)/sr) increase in cumulative average outdoor LAN was 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11). An association between LAN and breast cancer appeared to be limited to women who were premenopausal at the time of a case [HR=1.07 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.14) based on 1,973 cases vs. HR=1.00 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.09) based on 1,172 cases in postmenopausal women; p-interaction=0.08]. The LAN-breast cancer association was observed only in past and current smokers at the end of follow-up [HR=1.00 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.07) based on 2,215 cases in never smokers; HR=1.10 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.19) based on 1,034 cases in past smokers vs. HR=1.21 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.37) for 300 cases in current smokers; p-interaction=0.08]. CONCLUSIONS: Although further work is required to confirm our results and to clarify potential mechanisms, our findings suggest that exposure to residential outdoor light at night may contribute to invasive breast cancer risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP935.  
  Address Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28886600; PMCID:PMC5783660 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1886  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bierman, A.; Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring and predicting eyelid spectral transmittance Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Biomedical Optics Abbreviated Journal J Biomed Opt  
  Volume 16 Issue 6 Pages (down) 067011  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract The purpose of the present study was to objectively quantify the spectral transmittance of the eyelid. Reported here are data acquired using a technique that was developed to provide practical and accurate measurements of eyelid transmittance across the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The empirical data were analyzed in terms of the absorption and scattering characteristics of the constituents of skin to develop a method for predicting eyelid transmission. Results showed that the eyelid has a much higher optical density at short wavelengths than previously published. The mean +/- standard deviation (s.d.) optical density of the eyelid from 450 to 650 nm was 2.1 +/- 0.3 with an optical density range among subjects of approximately 1.0. The study results indicate that skin pigmentation is poorly correlated with eyelid transmission; eyelid transmission is most affected by wavelength-independent macromolecules in the eyelid as well as its overall thickness.  
  Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Lighting Research Center, 21 Union Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1083-3668 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21721832 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1530  
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Author Huss, A.; van Wel, L.; Bogaards, L.; Vrijkotte, T.; Wolf, L.; Hoek, G.; Vermeulen, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding Some Light in the Dark-A Comparison of Personal Measurements with Satellite-Based Estimates of Exposure to Light at Night among Children in the Netherlands Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages (down) 67001  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Exposure to light at night (LAN) can perturb the biological clock and affect sleep and health. Previous epidemiological studies have evaluated LAN levels measured by satellites, but the validity of this measure as a proxy for personal LAN exposure is unclear. In addition, outdoor satellite-measured LAN levels are higher in urban environments, which means that this measure could potentially represent a proxy for other, likely urban, environmental exposures. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated correlations of satellite-assessed LAN with measured bedroom light levels and explored correlations with other environmental exposures, in particular, air pollution, green space, and area-level socioeconomic position (SEP). METHODS: We compared satellite measurements with evening and nighttime bedroom measurements of illuminance (in units of lux) for 256 children, and we evaluated correlations between satellite-based measures and other urban exposures such as air pollution, area-level SEP, and surrounding green space for 3,021 children. RESULTS: Satellite-measured LAN levels (nanowatts per centimeter squared per steradian) were not correlated with measured evening or nighttime lux levels [Spearman correlation coefficients ([Formula: see text]) [Formula: see text] to 0.04]. There was a weak correlation with measurements during the darkest time period if parents and their children reported that outdoor light sometimes or usually influenced indoor light levels ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). In contrast, satellite-measured LAN levels were correlated with air pollution ([Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text]), and surrounding green space ([Formula: see text] for green space within [Formula: see text] of the home). A weak correlation with area-level SEP was also observed ([Formula: see text]). CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor satellite-assessed outdoor LAN exposure levels were correlated with urban environmental exposures, but they were not a good proxy for indoor evening or nighttime personal exposure as measured in our study population of 12-y-old children. Studies planning to evaluate potential risks from LAN should consider such modifying factors as curtains and indoor lighting and the use of electronic devices and should include performing indoor or personal measurements to validate any exposure proxies. The moderate-to-strong correlation of outdoor LAN with other environmental exposures should be accounted for in epidemiological investigations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3431.  
  Address 4 Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht, Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31157976 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2532  
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