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Author Griefahn, B,; Kretschmer, V.; Hölker, F.
Title Chronobiologische und gesundheitsrelevante Wirkungen des Lichts auf den Menschen Type Book Chapter
Year 2010 Publication LichtRegion. Positionen und Perspektiven im Ruhrgebiet. Essen: Klartext Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages 69-80
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor Köhler D, Walz M, Hochstadt S
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 855
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Author Boivin, D.; James, F.
Title Light treatment and circadian adaptation to shift work. Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Industrial Health Abbreviated Journal
Volume 43 Issue (up) Pages 34–48
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1002
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Author Paul, M.A.; Love, R.J.; Hawton, A.; Brett, K.; McCreary, D.R.; Arendt, J.
Title Sleep deficits in the high Arctic summer in relation to light exposure and behaviour: use of melatonin as a countermeasure Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1093
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Sahin, L.; Wood, B.; Plitnick, B.
Title Light at Night and Measures of Alertness and Performance: Implications for Shift Workers Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biological Research for Nursing Abbreviated Journal Biol Res Nurs
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Human Health; GO/NOGO test; alertness; melatonin; red light; shift work
Abstract Rotating-shift workers, particularly those working at night, are likely to experience sleepiness, decreased productivity, and impaired safety while on the job. Light at night has been shown to have acute alerting effects, reduce sleepiness, and improve performance. However, light at night can also suppress melatonin and induce circadian disruption, both of which have been linked to increased health risks. Previous studies have shown that long-wavelength (red) light exposure increases objective and subjective measures of alertness at night, without suppressing nocturnal melatonin. This study investigated whether exposure to red light at night would not only increase measures of alertness but also improve performance. It was hypothesized that exposure to both red (630 nm) and white (2,568 K) lights would improve performance but that only white light would significantly affect melatonin levels. Seventeen individuals participated in a 3-week, within-subjects, nighttime laboratory study. Compared to remaining in dim light, participants had significantly faster reaction times in the GO/NOGO test after exposure to both red light and white light. Compared to dim light exposure, power in the alpha and alpha-theta regions was significantly decreased after exposure to red light. Melatonin levels were significantly suppressed by white light only. Results show that not only can red light improve measures of alertness, but it can also improve certain types of performance at night without affecting melatonin levels. These findings could have significant practical applications for nurses; red light could help nurses working rotating shifts maintain nighttime alertness, without suppressing melatonin or changing their circadian phase.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1099-8004 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25697165 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1110
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Zhu, Y.
Title Electric light, particularly at night, disrupts human circadian rhythmicity: is that a problem? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue (up) Pages 20140120
Keywords Human Health; circadian disruption; breast cancer; circadian genes; artificial light at night; iron
Abstract Over the past 3 billion years, an endogenous circadian rhythmicity has developed in almost all life forms in which daily oscillations in physiology occur. This allows for anticipation of sunrise and sunset. This physiological rhythmicity is kept at precisely 24 h by the daily cycle of sunlight and dark. However, since the introduction of electric lighting, there has been inadequate light during the day inside buildings for a robust resetting of the human endogenous circadian rhythmicity, and too much light at night for a true dark to be detected; this results in circadian disruption and alters sleep/wake cycle, core body temperature, hormone regulation and release, and patterns of gene expression throughout the body. The question is the extent to which circadian disruption compromises human health, and can account for a portion of the modern pandemics of breast and prostate cancers, obesity, diabetes and depression. As societies modernize (i.e. electrify) these conditions increase in prevalence. There are a number of promising leads on putative mechanisms, and epidemiological findings supporting an aetiologic role for electric lighting in disease causation. These include melatonin suppression, circadian gene expression, and connection of circadian rhythmicity to metabolism in part affected by haem iron intake and distribution.
Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA; bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1118
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