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Author Dauchy, R.T.; Xiang, S.; Mao, L.; Brimer, S.; Wren, M.A.; Yuan, L.; Anbalagan, M.; Hauch, A.; Frasch, T.; Rowan, B.G.; Blask, D.E.; Hill, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian and melatonin disruption by exposure to light at night drives intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Cancer Research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 74 Issue 15 Pages 4099-4110  
  Keywords (up) *Cancer; breast cancer; melatonin; endocrinology; tamoxifen; *Circadian Rhythm; circadian disruption; human health; epidemiology  
  Abstract Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major impediment to successful treatment of breast cancer. Preclinical and clinical evidence links resistance to antiestrogen drugs in breast cancer cells with the overexpression and/or activation of various pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Disruption of circadian rhythms by night shift work or disturbed sleep-wake cycles may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer and other diseases. Moreover, light exposure at night (LEN) suppresses the nocturnal production of melatonin that inhibits breast cancer growth. In this study, we used a rat model of estrogen receptor (ERalpha(+)) MCF-7 tumor xenografts to demonstrate how altering light/dark cycles with dim LEN (dLEN) speed the development of breast tumors, increasing their metabolism and growth and conferring an intrinsic resistance to tamoxifen therapy. These characteristics were not observed in animals in which the circadian melatonin rhythm was not disrupted, or in animals subjected to dLEN if they received nocturnal melatonin replacement. Strikingly, our results also showed that melatonin acted both as a tumor metabolic inhibitor and a circadian-regulated kinase inhibitor to reestablish the sensitivity of breast tumors to tamoxifen and tumor regression. Together, our findings show how dLEN-mediated disturbances in nocturnal melatonin production can render tumors insensitive to tamoxifen. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4099-110. (c)2014 AACR.  
  Address Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium; Tulane Circadian Cancer Biology Group; and  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25062775; PMCID:PMC4119539 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 355  
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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Chbeir, S.A.; Nelson, R.J.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night exacerbates metabolic dysfunction in a polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 231 Issue Pages 116574  
  Keywords (up) Animals; diabetes; human health; mouse models; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin Resistance  
  Abstract AIMS: Electric lighting is beneficial to modern society; however, it is becoming apparent that light at night (LAN) is not without biological consequences. Several studies have reported negative effects of LAN on health and behavior in humans and nonhuman animals. Exposure of non-diabetic mice to dim LAN impairs glucose tolerance, whereas a return to dark nights (LD) reverses this impairment. We predicted that exposure to LAN would exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities in TALLYHO/JngJ (TH) mice, a polygenic model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We exposed 7-week old male TH mice to either LD or LAN for 8-10weeks in two separate experiments. After 8weeks of light treatment, we conducted intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing (ipGTT) followed by intraperitoneal insulin tolerance testing (ipITT). In Experiment 1, all mice were returned to LD for 4weeks, and ipITT was repeated. KEY FINDINGS: The major results of this study are i) LAN exposure for 8weeks exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance ii) the effects of LAN on insulin resistance are reversed upon return to LD, iii) LAN exposure results in a greater increase in body weight compared to LD exposure, iv) LAN increases the incidence of mice developing overt T2DM, and v) LAN exposure decreases survival of mice with T2DM. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, LAN exacerbated metabolic abnormalities in a polygenic mouse model of T2DM, and these effects were reversed upon return to dark nights. The applicability of these findings to humans with T2DM needs to be determined.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31207311 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2549  
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Author Rund, S.; O'Donnell, A.; Gentile, J.; Reece, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Insects Abbreviated Journal Insects  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 14  
  Keywords (up) Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control.  
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  ISSN 2075-4450 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1421  
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Author Pacheco-Tucuch, F.S.; Ramirez-Sierra, M.J.; Gourbiere, S.; Dumonteil, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Public street lights increase house infestation by the Chagas disease vector Triatoma dimidiata Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages e36207  
  Keywords (up) Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Triatoma dimidiata is one of the primary vectors of Chagas disease. We previously documented the spatio-temporal infestation of houses by this species in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and found that non-domiciliated triatomines were specifically attracted to houses. However, the factors mediating this attraction remained unclear. Artificial light has been known for a long time to attract many insect species, and therefore may contribute to the spread of different vector-borne diseases. Also, based on the collection of different species of triatomines with light traps, several authors have suggested that light might attract triatomines to houses, but the role of artificial light in house infestation has never been clearly demonstrated and quantified. Here we performed a spatial analysis of house infestation pattern by T. dimidiata in relation to the distribution of artificial light sources in three different villages from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. In all three villages, infested houses were significantly closer to public street light sources than non-infested houses (18.0 +/- 0.6 vs 22.6 +/- 0.4 m), and street lights rather than domestic lights were associated with house infestation. Accordingly, houses closer to a public street lights were 1.64 times more likely to be infested than houses further away (OR, CI95% 1.23-2.18). Behavioral experiments using a dual-choice chamber further confirmed that adult male and females were attracted to white light during their nocturnal activity. Attraction was also dependent on light color and decreased with increasing wavelength. While public lighting is usually associated with increased development, these data clearly show that it also directly contributes to house infestation by non-domiciliated T. dimidiata.  
  Address Laboratorio de Parasitologia, Centro de Investigaciones Regionales Dr. Hideyo Noguchi, Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22558384; PMCID:PMC3338588 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1489  
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Author Versteeg, R.I.; Stenvers, D.J.; Kalsbeek, A.; Bisschop, P.H.; Serlie, M.J.; la Fleur, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nutrition in the spotlight: metabolic effects of environmental light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Nutr Soc  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 451-463  
  Keywords (up) Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the dominant Zeitgeber for the central circadian clock, which resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, and coordinates daily rhythm in feeding behaviour and metabolism. Eating during inappropriate light conditions may result in metabolic disease via changes in the biological clock. In this review, we describe the physiological role of light in the circadian timing system and explore the interaction between the circadian timing system and metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss the acute and chronic effects of artificial light exposure on food intake and energy metabolism in animals and human subjects. We propose that living in synchrony with the natural daily LD cycle promotes metabolic health and increased exposure to artificial light at inappropriate times of day has adverse effects on metabolism, feeding behaviour and body weight regulation. Reducing the negative side effects of the extensive use of artificial light in human subjects might be useful in the prevention of metabolic disease.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism,Academic Medical Center,University of Amsterdam,Meibergdreef 9,F2-154, 1105 AZ Amsterdam-Zuidoost,The Netherlands  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-6651 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27499509 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1504  
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