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Author Cherrie, J.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding Light on the Association between Night Work and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health  
  Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 608–611  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; shift work  
  Abstract Shift work that involves circadian disruption has been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, although more recent epidemiological evidence is not consistent. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain an association between night work and female breast cancer, but the most likely is suppression of the hormone melatonin by light exposure at night. Three articles recently published in this journal describe aspects of exposure to light during night work. These articles and other evidence suggest that nighttime light levels may not always be sufficient to affect melatonin production, which could in part explain the inconsistencies in the epidemiological data. There is need to improve the specificity and reliability of exposure assessments in future epidemiological studies of night shift workers.  
  Address Institute of Occupational Medicine, Research Avenue North, Edinburgh, UK  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31175355 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2530  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Martinsons, C.; Attia, D.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Carré, S.; Enouf, O.; Falcón, J.; Gronfier, C.; Hicks, D.; Metlaine, A.; Tahkamo, L.; Torriglia, A.; Viénot, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Correspondence: An appraisal of the effects on human health and the environment of using light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 1275-1276  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Human Health; Ecology  
  Abstract In May 2019, a collective appraisal report of the effects on human health and the environment of systems using light emitting diodes(LEDs) was published by ANSES, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety. Here, the experts involved in this work provide anover view of their conclusions and recommendations.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2789  
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Author Donker, D. W. url  openurl
  Title Light and noise nuisance … deciphered yet underappreciated ‘Rosetta Stone’ of the modern ICU? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Netherlands Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 144  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Human Health; hospitals; Department of Intensive Care Unit; health care  
  Abstract In everyday life, we take for granted that public authorities protect us from an unhealthy environment, including light and noise pollution. In recent years, about 1200 kilometres of noise barriers have been built alongside Dutch highways with costs approaching a billion euros. Also, more than 50 cities in the Netherlands have successfully taken initiatives to reduce the artificial light pollution in the past six years, as our country is well known to rank among the literally most illuminated ones in the world. These investments seem to be reasonable as adverse health effects from environmental light and noise pollution have long and widely been recognised. How these potentially detrimental effects of artificial light and distressing noise acting on the human body translate into the best possible care that we strive to provide within our modern ICU environment is an area of increasing professional awareness, interest and research. Yet, we all realise that not only light and noise, but numerous physical and psychological stressors may negatively affect individual ICU patients. Also, the impact of these factors may vary considerably among individuals, which makes it even more difficult for caregivers to prioritise among apparently competing aspects of care in their daily practice. A comprehensive, narrative review by Koen Simons and colleagues in this issue of the Netherlands Journal of Critical Care provides us with up-to-date information on the ‘impact of intensive care unit light and noise exposure on critically ill patients’.Here, we gain more insights and learn how a multimodal approach to our ICU environment may aid to optimise light exposure and reduce noise. This may not only improve our patients’ sleep and general wellbeing, but also

reduce the incidence of delirium. The latter seems especially relevant since the pharmacological prevention of delirium has repeatedly been shown to be disappointing, as recently confirmed again in a large Dutch trial. All this evidence sets the stage to further promote nonpharmacological interventions in the ICU to prevent delirium. Therefore, we should do our best to limit controllable stressors in the ICU in order to improve patient comfort and hopefully enhance the individual prognosis. As our traditional focus on the medical and technical aspects of critical care has led us to asymptotically reach current therapeutic optima; human factors and soft skills are no longer far in the horizon of the modern ICU.
 
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  Publisher NJCC Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2625  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Defense Meteorological Satellite Program data should no longer be used for epidemiological studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiology International  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 943-945  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Human Health; Remote Sensing  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1459  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Holker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Window illumination should be expected to poorly correlate with satellite brightness measurements Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 87-8  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22217106 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2533  
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