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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Make lighting healthier Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 553 Issue 7688 Pages 274-276  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial illumination can stop us sleeping and make us ill. We need fresh strategies and technologies, argues Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2932  
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Author Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113  
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Author Price, L.L.A.; Udovicic, L.; Behrens, T.; van Drongelen, A.; Garde, A.H.; Hogenelst, K.; Jensen, M.A.; Khazova, M.; Nowak, K.; Rabstein, S.; Romanus, E.; Wolska, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Linking the non-visual effects of light exposure with occupational health Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 48 Issue 5 Pages 1393–1397  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Review; Human Health; non-visual effects  
  Abstract In May 2018, the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA, Germany) hosted ‘Light and Health at Work’, a workshop concerning occupational health issues relating to non-visual effects of light of both indoor and shift workers. The agenda reflected a common interest in translational research linking laboratory findings with occupational and public health outcomes, and resulted in the founding of the European scientific network NoVEL (standing for Non-Visual Effects of Light). This article sets out the network participants’ shared goals to improve the scientific evidence about light’s non-visual effects, circadian disruption and well-being, using light exposure interventions with high quality assessment of light.

The main work conditions that impair exposure profiles that support healthy circadian regulation are daytime indoor work that reduces light exposures and night-shift work that increases light-at-night (LAN).
 
  Address Central Institute for Labour Protection – National Research Institute (CIOP-PIB), Warszawa, Poland  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31257447 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2566  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kavcic, P.; Rojc, B.; Dolenc-Groselj, L.; Claustrat, B.; Fujs, K.; Poljak, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of sleep deprivation and nighttime light exposure on clock gene expression in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Croatian Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Croat Med J  
  Volume 52 Issue 5 Pages 594-603  
  Keywords (up) genomics; epigenetics; hPer2; hBmal1; clock genes; gene expression; biology; human health  
  Abstract Aim

To examine the effect of acute sleep deprivation under light conditions on the expression of two key clock genes, hPer2 and hBmal1, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on plasma melatonin and cortisol levels.

Methods

Blood samples were drawn from 6 healthy individuals at 4-hour intervals for three consecutive nights, including a night of total sleep deprivation (second night). The study was conducted in April-June 2006 at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana.

Results

We found a significant diurnal variation in hPer2 and hBmal1 expression levels under baseline (P < 0.001, F = 19.7, df = 30 for hPer2 and P < 0.001, F = 17.6, df = 30 for hBmal1) and sleep-deprived conditions (P < 0.001, F = 9.2, df = 30 for hPer2 and P < 0.001, F = 13.2, df = 30 for hBmal1). Statistical analysis with the single cosinor method revealed circadian variation of hPer2 under baseline and of hBmal1 under baseline and sleep-deprived conditions. The peak expression of hPer2 was at 13:55 ± 1:15 hours under baseline conditions and of hBmal1 at 16:08 ± 1:18 hours under baseline and at 17:13 ± 1:35 hours under sleep-deprived conditions. Individual cosinor analysis of hPer2 revealed a loss of circadian rhythm in 3 participants and a phase shift in 2 participants under sleep-deprived conditions. The plasma melatonin and cortisol rhythms confirmed a conventional alignment of the central circadian pacemaker to the habitual sleep/wake schedule.

Conclusion

Our results suggest that 40-hour acute sleep deprivation under light conditions may affect the expression of hPer2 in PBMCs.
 
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  ISSN 0353-9504 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 135  
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Author Komada, Y.; Aoki, K.; Gohshi, S.; Ichioka, H.; Shibata, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans: Blue light and melatonin secretion Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Sleep and Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Sleep and Biological Rhythms  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 316–322  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exposure to different types of television displays at habitual bedtime on human melatonin and cortisol secretion. Thirteen male participants (mean age: 22.7 ± 0.85 years) were tested over three nights in one baseline and two experimental sessions. Participants were instructed to watch a movie on four different luminance- and wavelength-controlled television displays: normal luminance (450 candela [cd]/m2) or high luminance (1200&#8201;cd/m2) and normal blue light or half blue light. Salivary melatonin and cortisol levels were measured at two time points before and after television viewing. There was no significant difference in cortisol secretion due to the different displays. Melatonin suppression was significantly lower following the exposure to the half-blue light display compared with the normal blue light display. These results suggest that the use of half-blue light displays during night time may prevent circadian rhythm dysfunction.  
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  ISSN 1446-9235 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1149  
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