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Author Reiter, R.; Tan, D.; SanchezBarcelo, E.; Mediavilla, M.; Gitto, E.; Korkmaz, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian mechanisms in the regulation of melatonin synthesis: disruption with light at night and the pathophysiological consequences Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Experimental and Integrative Medicine Abbreviated Journal J Exp Integr Med  
  Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 13  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract In the past two decades, the results of a number of epidemiological studies have uncovered an association between excessive light exposure at night and the prevalence of cancer. Whereas the evidence supporting this link is strongest between nighttime light and female breast and male prostate cancer, the frequency of other tumor types may also be elevated. Individuals who have the highest reported increase in cancer are chronic night shift workers and flight attendants who routinely fly across numerous time zones.

There are at least two obvious physiological consequences of nighttime light exposure, i.e., a reduction in circulating melatonin levels and disruption of the circadian system (chronodisruption). Both these perturbations in experimental animals aggravate tumor growth. Melatonin has a long investigative history in terms of its ability to stymie the growth of many tumor types. Likewise, in the last decade chronodisruption has been unequivocally linked to a variety of abnormal metabolic conditions including excessive tumor growth.

This brief review summarizes the processes by which light after darkness onset impedes melatonin production and disturbs circadian rhythms. The survey also reviews the evidence associating the ostensible danger of excessive nighttime light pollution to cancer risk. If an elevated tumor frequency is definitively proven to be a consequence of light at night and/or chronodisruption, it seems likely that cancer will not be the exclusive pathophysiological change associated with the rampant light pollution characteristic of modern societies.
 
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  ISSN 1309-4572 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 137  
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Author Lin, J.B.; Gerratt, B.W.; Bassi, C.J.; Apte, R.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Short-Wavelength Light-Blocking Eyeglasses Attenuate Symptoms of Eye Fatigue Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science Abbreviated Journal Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci  
  Volume 58 Issue 1 Pages 442-447  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether subjects who wear short wavelength-blocking eyeglasses during computer tasks exhibit less visual fatigue and report fewer symptoms of visual discomfort than subjects wearing eyeglasses with clear lenses. Methods: A total of 36 healthy subjects (20 male; 16 female) was randomized to wearing no-block, low-blocking, or high-blocking eyeglasses while performing a 2-hour computer task. A masked grader measured critical flicker fusion frequency (CFF) as a metric of eye fatigue and evaluated symptoms of eye strain with a 15-item questionnaire before and after computer use. Results: We found that the change in CFF after the computer task was significantly more positive (i.e., less eye fatigue) in the high-block versus the no-block (P = 0.027) and low-block (P = 0.008) groups. Moreover, random assignment to the high-block group but not to the low-block group predicted a more positive change in CFF (i.e., less eye fatigue) following the computer task (adjusted beta = 2.310; P = 0.002). Additionally, subjects wearing high-blocking eyeglasses reported significantly less feeling pain around/inside the eye (P = 0.0063), less feeling that the eyes were heavy (P = 0.0189), and less feeling that the eyes were itchy (P = 0.0043) following the computer task, when compared to subjects not wearing high-blocking lenses. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that short-wavelength light-blocking eyeglasses may reduce eye strain associated with computer use based on a physiologic correlate of eye fatigue and on subjects' reporting of symptoms typically associated with eye strain.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States 4Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States 5Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States  
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  ISSN 0146-0404 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28118668 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1629  
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Author Kim, J.; Hwang, K.; Cho, J.; Koo, D.; Joo, E.; Hong, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background eeg rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages e170  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial lighting has benefited society by extending the length of a productive day, but it can be ”light pollution” when it becomes excessive. Unnecessary exposure to artificial light at night can cause myopia, obesity, metabolic disorders and even some type of cancers.  
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  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 502  
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Author Bercz, P.A.; Jaffe, F. url  openurl
  Title Adverse health effects of shift work and shift work sleep disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Dialogue and Diagnosis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 13-20  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 506  
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Author Blask, D.; Brainard, G.; Gibbons, R.; Lockley, S.; Stevens, R.; Motta, M. openurl 
  Title Light Pollution: Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting. Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Report 4 of the Council on Science and Public Health, American Medical Association. Abbreviated Journal  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 508  
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