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Author Wada, K.; Nagata, C.; Nakamura, K.; Iwasa, S.; Shiraki, M.; Shimizu, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light exposure at night, sleep duration and sex hormone levels in pregnant Japanese women Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Endocrine Journal Abbreviated Journal Endocr J  
  Volume 59 Issue 5 Pages 393-398  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract The association between light exposure at night and sex hormone levels in utero has scarcely reported. We assessed the associations between sleep duration or being awake in the late evening hours, which can be as indicator of light exposure at night, and the maternal and umbilical blood hormone levels during pregnancy and at delivery among Japanese women. The data for 236 women and their newborns who visited a maternal clinic in Gifu, Japan, between May 2000 and October 2001 were analyzed. Maternal blood samples were obtained at approximately the 10th weeks, 29th weeks of gestation, and at delivery. Umbilical cord artery blood was immediately drawn after birth. Information for sleep during pregnancy was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. The levels of estradiol and testosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Maternal serum testosterone level in the 10th week was higher among those who were awake at or after 1:00 a.m. than among those who were asleep at that time (P = 0.032). Maternal estradiol level in the 29th week was inversely associated with sleep duration on weekends (P = 0.043). Umbilical testosterone level at delivery inversely correlated with sleep duration on weekdays (P = 0.030). These associations were somewhat stronger among mothers with female offspring than those with male offspring. These results suggested that exposure to light at night might increase sex hormone levels during pregnancy.  
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  ISSN 0918-8959 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 518  
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Author Benke, K.E.; Benke, K.K.; Dimitriadis, C. url  openurl
  Title Spectral content of artificial lighting and effects on health. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages 13-15  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract There is an increasing body of evidence indicating possible health effects from prolonged exposure to artificial lighting after dark. Both compact fluorescent lights and light emitting diode lamps have a greater proportion of blue light in the emission spectrum than the older incandescent light sources. Exposure to the blue light component at night has been the subject of ongoing research, with a number of published studies linking blue light content to the disruption of the internal body clock, suppression of melatonin production and various ocular effects. Aside from short-term discomfort, possible health effects include long-term chronic illnesses, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A brief review of recent research is provided, salient health issues are noted and discussed, and some examples of exposure minimisation strategies are suggested.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 520  
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Author Higuchi, S.; Fukuda, T.; Kozaki, T.; Takahashi, M.; Miura, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effectiveness of a Red-visor Cap for Preventing Light-induced Melatonin Suppression during Simulated Night Work Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of PHYSIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY Abbreviated Journal J Physiol Anthropol  
  Volume 30 Issue 6 Pages 251-258  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract Bright light at night improves the alertness of night workers. Melatonin suppression induced by light at night is, however, reported to be a possible risk factor for breast cancer. Short-wavelength light has a strong impact on melatonin suppression. A red-visor cap can cut the short-wavelength light from the upper visual field selectively with no adverse effects on visibility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a red-visor cap on light-induced melatonin suppression, performance, and sleepiness at night. Eleven healthy young male adults (mean age: 21.2±0.9 yr) volunteered to participate in this study. On the first day, the subjects spent time in dim light (<15 lx) from 20:00 to 03:00 to measure baseline data of nocturnal salivary melatonin concentration. On the second day, the subjects were exposed to light for four hours from 23:00 to 03:00 with a nonvisor cap (500 lx), red-visor cap (approx. 160 lx) and blue-visor cap (approx. 160 lx). Subjective sleepiness and performance of a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) were also measured on the second day. Compared to salivary melatonin concentration under dim light, the decrease in melatonin concentration was significant in a nonvisor cap condition but was not significant in a red-visor cap condition. The percentages of melatonin suppression in the nonvisor cap and red-visor cap conditions at 4 hours after exposure to light were 52.6±22.4% and 7.7±3.3%, respectively. The red-visor cap had no adverse effect on performance of the PVT, brightness and visual comfort, though it tended to increase subjective sleepiness. These results suggest that a red-visor cap is effective in preventing melatonin suppression with no adverse effects on vigilance performance, brightness and visibility.  
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  ISSN 1880-6791 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 521  
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Author Salgado-Delgado, R.; Tapia Osorio, A.; Saderi, N.; Escobar, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of circadian rhythms: a crucial factor in the etiology of depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Depression Research and Treatment Abbreviated Journal Depress Res Treat  
  Volume 2011 Issue Pages 839743  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
  Abstract Circadian factors might play a crucial role in the etiology of depression. It has been demonstrated that the disruption of circadian rhythms by lighting conditions and lifestyle predisposes individuals to a wide range of mood disorders, including impulsivity, mania and depression. Also, associated with depression, there is the impairment of circadian rhythmicity of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic functions. Inspite of this close relationship between both processes, the complex relationship between the biological clock and the incidence of depressive symptoms is far from being understood. The efficiency and the timing of treatments based on chronotherapy (e.g., light treatment, sleep deprivation, and scheduled medication) indicate that the circadian system is an essential target in the therapy of depression. The aim of the present review is to analyze the biological and clinical data that link depression with the disruption of circadian rhythms, emphasizing the contribution of circadian desynchrony. Therefore, we examine the conditions that may lead to circadian disruption of physiology and behavior as described in depressive states, and, according to this approach, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at treating the circadian system and depression.  
  Address Departamento de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04306 Mexico, DF, Mexico  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2090-1321 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21845223; PMCID:PMC3154570 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 524  
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Author Chepesiuk, R. url  openurl
  Title Missing the Dark: Health Effects of Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 117 Issue 1 Pages A20-A27  
  Keywords (up) Human Health  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 526  
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