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Author Cherrie, J.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding Light on the Association between Night Work and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health  
  Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 608–611  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; shift work  
  Abstract Shift work that involves circadian disruption has been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, although more recent epidemiological evidence is not consistent. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain an association between night work and female breast cancer, but the most likely is suppression of the hormone melatonin by light exposure at night. Three articles recently published in this journal describe aspects of exposure to light during night work. These articles and other evidence suggest that nighttime light levels may not always be sufficient to affect melatonin production, which could in part explain the inconsistencies in the epidemiological data. There is need to improve the specificity and reliability of exposure assessments in future epidemiological studies of night shift workers.  
  Address Institute of Occupational Medicine, Research Avenue North, Edinburgh, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31175355 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2530  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aschoff, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparative physiology: diurnal rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 1963 Publication (up) Annual Review of Physiology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Physiol  
  Volume 25 Issue Pages 581-600  
  Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological; *Periodicity; *Adaptation, Physiological; *Periodicity  
  Abstract  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0066-4278 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:13965146 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 710  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kraneburg, A.; Franke, S.; Methling, R.; Griefahn, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of color temperature on melatonin production for illumination of working environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Applied Ergonomics  
  Volume 58 Issue Pages 446-453  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1510  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Regente, J.; de Zeeuw, J.; Bes, F.; Nowozin, C.; Appelhoff, S.; Wahnschaffe, A.; Münch, M.; Kunz, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can short-wavelength depleted bright light during single simulated night shifts prevent circadian phase shifts? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Applied Ergonomics  
  Volume 61 Issue Pages 22-30  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract In single night shifts, extending habitual wake episodes leads to sleep deprivation induced decrements of performance during the shift and re-adaptation effects the next day. We investigated whether short-wavelength depleted (=filtered) bright light (FBL) during a simulated night shift would counteract such effects. Twenty-four participants underwent a simulated night shift in dim light (DL) and in FBL. Reaction times, subjective sleepiness and salivary melatonin concentrations were assessed during both nights. Daytime sleep was recorded after both simulated night shifts. During FBL, we found no melatonin suppression compared to DL, but slightly faster reaction times in the second half of the night. Daytime sleep was not statistically different between both lighting conditions (n = 24) and there was no significant phase shift after FBL (n = 11). To conclude, our results showed positive effects from FBL during simulated single night shifts which need to be further tested with larger groups, in more applied studies and compared to standard lighting.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1622  
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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Utilizing remote sensing and big data to quantify conflict intensity: The Arab Spring as a case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography  
  Volume 94 Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; Human Health  
  Abstract Tracking global and regional conflict zones requires spatially explicit information in near real-time. Here, we examined the potential of remote sensing time-series data (night lights) and big data (data mining of news events and Flickr photos) for monitoring and understanding crisis development and refugee flows. We used the recent Arab Spring as a case study, and examined temporal trends in monthly time series of variables which we hypothesized to indicate conflict intensity, covering all Arab countries. Both Flickr photos and night-time lights proved as sensitive indicators for loss of economic and human capital, and news items from the Global Data on Events, Location and Tone (GDELT) project on fight events were positively correlated with actual deaths from conflicts. We propose that big data and remote sensing datasets have potential to provide disaggregated and timely data on conflicts where official statistics are lacking, offering an effective approach for monitoring geopolitical and environmental changes on Earth.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-6228 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1918  
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