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Author Chaput, J.-P.; Weippert, M.; LeBlanc, A.G.; Hjorth, M.F.; Michaelsen, K.F.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.; Tremblay, M.S.; Barreira, T.V.; Broyles, S.T.; Fogelholm, M.; Hu, G.; Kuriyan, R.; Kurpad, A.; Lambert, E.V.; Maher, C.; Maia, J.; Matsudo, V.; Olds, T.; Onywera, V.; Sarmiento, O.L.; Standage, M.; Tudor-Locke, C.; Zhao, P.; Sjodin, A.M.
Title (up) Are Children Like Werewolves? Full Moon and Its Association with Sleep and Activity Behaviors in an International Sample of Children Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal Front Pediatr
Volume 4 Issue Pages 24
Keywords Human Health; Moonlight
Abstract In order to verify if the full moon is associated with sleep and activity behaviors, we used a 12-country study providing 33,710 24-h accelerometer recordings of sleep and activity. The present observational, cross-sectional study included 5812 children ages 9-11 years from study sites that represented all inhabited continents and wide ranges of human development (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland, India, Kenya, Portugal, South Africa, United Kingdom, and United States). Three moon phases were used in this analysis: full moon (+/-4 days; reference), half moon (+/-5-9 days), and new moon (+/-10-14 days) from nearest full moon. Nocturnal sleep duration, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and total sedentary time (SED) were monitored over seven consecutive days using a waist-worn accelerometer worn 24 h a day. Only sleep duration was found to significantly differ between moon phases (~5 min/night shorter during full moon compared to new moon). Differences in MVPA, LPA, and SED between moon phases were negligible and non-significant (<2 min/day difference). There was no difference in the associations between study sites. In conclusion, sleep duration was 1% shorter at full moon compared to new moon, while activity behaviors were not significantly associated with the lunar cycle in this global sample of children. Whether this seemingly minimal difference is clinically meaningful is questionable.
Address University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-2360 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27047907; PMCID:PMC4805596 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1556
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Author Swaminathan, K.; Klerman, E.B.; Phillips, A.J.K.
Title (up) Are Individual Differences in Sleep and Circadian Timing Amplified by Use of Artificial Light Sources? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume Issue Pages 748730417699310
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Within the human population, there is large interindividual variability in the timing of sleep and circadian rhythms. This variability has been attributed to individual differences in sleep physiology, circadian physiology, and/or light exposure. Recent experimental evidence suggests that the latter is necessary to evoke large interindividual differences in sleep and circadian timing. We used a validated model of human sleep and circadian physiology to test the hypothesis that intrinsic differences in sleep and circadian timing are amplified by self-selected use of artificial light sources. We tested the model under 2 conditions motivated by an experimental study (Wright et al., 2013): (1) a “natural” light cycle, and (2) a “realistic” light cycle that included attenuation of light due to living indoors when natural light levels are high and use of electric light when natural light levels are low. Within these conditions, we determined the relationship between intrinsic circadian period (within the range of 23.7-24.6 h) and timing of sleep onset, sleep offset, and circadian rhythms. In addition, we simulated a work week, with fixed wake time for 5 days and free sleep times on weekends. Under both conditions, a longer intrinsic period resulted in later sleep and circadian timing. Compared to the natural condition, the realistic condition evoked more than double the variation in sleep timing across the physiological range of intrinsic circadian periods. Model predictions closely matched data from the experimental study. We found that if the intrinsic circadian period was long (>24.2 h) under the realistic condition, there was significant mismatch in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends, which is known as social jetlag. These findings indicate that individual tendencies to have very delayed schedules can be greatly amplified by self-selected modifications to the natural light/dark cycle. This has important implications for therapeutic treatment of advanced or delayed sleep phase disorders.
Address School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28367676 Approved no
Call Number SU @ spitschan @ Serial 1648
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Author Rybnikova, N.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A.
Title (up) Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) and breast cancer incidence worldwide: A revisit of earlier findings with analysis of current trends Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 32 Issue 6 Pages 757-773
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In a study published in Cancer Causes & Control in 2010, Kloog with co-authors tested, apparently for the first time, the association between population-level ambient exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) and incidence of several cancers in women from 164 countries worldwide. The study was based on 1996-2002 data and concluded that breast cancer (BC) incidence was significantly and positively associated with ALAN, while no such association was revealed for other cancer types. An open question, however, remains whether the trends revealed by Kloog and co-authors were time specific or also hold true for more recent data. Using information obtained from the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2002 and 2012 databases, we reanalyzed the strength of association between BC incidence rates in 180 countries worldwide and ALAN, controlling for several country-level predictors, including birth rates, percent of urban population, per capita GDP and electricity consumption. We also compared BC age-standardized rates (ASRs) with multi-annual ALAN measurements, considering potentially different latency periods. Compared with the results of Kloog et al.'s analysis of the year-2002 BC-data, the association between BC and ALAN appears to have weakened overall, becoming statistically insignificant in the year 2012 after being controlled for potential confounders (t < 0.3; p > 0.5). However, when the entire sample of countries was disaggregated into geographic clusters of similarly developed countries, a positive BC-ALAN association re-emerged as statistically significant (t > 2.2; p < 0.01), helping to explain, along with other factors covered by the analysis, about 65-85% of BC ASR variability worldwide, depending on the model type. Although the present analysis reconfirms a positive BC-ALAN association, this association appeared to diverge regionally in recent years, with countries in Western Europe showing the highest levels of such association, while countries in Southeast Asia and Gulf States exhibiting relatively low BC rates against the backdrop of relatively high ALAN levels. This regional stratification may be due to additional protective mechanisms, diminishing BC risks and potentially attributed to the local diet and lifestyles.
Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel , and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26102518 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1232
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Author Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A.
Title (up) Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control
Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908
Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED
Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.
Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143
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Author Haim, A.; Zubidat, A.E.
Title (up) Artificial light at night: melatonin as a mediator between the environment and epigenome Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140121
Keywords Human Health; melatonin; epigenetic modifications; epigenetics; epigenome; light pollution; breast cancer; oncogenesis; tumorigenesis; biomarkers
Abstract The adverse effects of excessive use of artificial light at night (ALAN) are becoming increasingly evident and associated with several health problems including cancer. Results of epidemiological studies revealed that the increase in breast cancer incidents co-distribute with ALAN worldwide. There is compiling evidence that suggests that melatonin suppression is linked to ALAN-induced cancer risks, but the specific genetic mechanism linking environmental exposure and the development of disease is not well known. Here we propose a possible genetic link between environmental exposure and tumorigenesis processes. We discuss evidence related to the relationship between epigenetic remodelling and oncogene expression. In breast cancer, enhanced global hypomethylation is expected in oncogenes, whereas in tumour suppressor genes local hypermethylation is recognized in the promoter CpG chains. A putative mechanism of action involving epigenetic modifications mediated by pineal melatonin is discussed in relation to cancer prevalence. Taking into account that ALAN-induced epigenetic modifications are reversible, early detection of cancer development is of great significance in the treatment of the disease. Therefore, new biomarkers for circadian disruption need to be developed to prevent ALAN damage.
Address The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905, Israel; ahaim@research.haifa.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1119
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