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Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nehme, P.A.; Amaral, F.; Lowden, A.; Skene, D.J.; Cipolla-Neto, J.; Moreno, C.R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduced melatonin synthesis in pregnant night workers: metabolic implications for offspring Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Medical Hypotheses  
  Volume 132 Issue Pages 109353  
  Keywords Human Health; Pregnancy; Melatonin; Melatonin synthesis; Circadian disruption; shift work  
  Abstract Several novel animal studies have shown that intrauterine metabolic programming can be modified in the event of reduced melatonin synthesis during pregnancy, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in the offspring. It is therefore postulated that female night workers when pregnant may expose the offspring to unwanted health threats. This may be explained by the fact that melatonin is essential for regulating energy metabolism and can influence reproductive activity. Moreover, the circadian misalignment caused by shift work affects fertility and the fetus, increasing the risk of miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight, phenomena observed in night workers. Thus, we hypothesize that light-induced melatonin suppression as a result of night work may alter intrauterine metabolic programming in pregnant women, potentially leading to metabolic disorders in their offspring.  
  Address School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2610  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Canazei, M.; Pohl, W.; Weninger, J.; Bliem, H.; Weiss, E.M.; Koch, C.; Berger, A.; Firulovic, B.; Marth, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of adjustable dynamic bedroom lighting in a maternity ward Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology  
  Volume 62 Issue Pages 59-66  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract There exists initial evidence for beneficial daylight effects in hospital bedrooms. However, study results with automatically controlled dynamic bedroom lights were so far inconclusive. It can be hypothesized that inclusion of critically ill patients and unpleasant fixed bright light stimuli so far could have masked non-visual light effects on patient's sleep, mood and circadian physiology.

Therefore, a temporarily adjustable dynamic light was installed in double bedrooms in a maternity clinic. Although mothers were exposed to fixed morning bright light under dynamic light they were allowed to adjust light intensities the rest of the day. In contrast, light colours were automatically changed over 24 h and could not be altered. Double bedrooms with standard switchable light were utilized as active control condition.

A sample of 72 women, giving birth to healthy term babies, were randomly assigned to bedrooms with dynamic or standard light. Light conditions adjusted by mothers, sleep quality, mood and diurnal melatonin level, as well as physical activity levels of mothers and neonates, were recorded.

Mothers exposed themselves and their babies to higher daytime and lower evening light levels under dynamic light compared to standard light after the period of fixed morning bright light exposure had ended. Although no overall effects on maternal parameters could be observed under dynamic light, we could reveal an earlier daily onset of neonatal physical activity levels in these bedrooms.

To conclude, this study indicates that an adjustable dynamic light may substantially affect indoor light exposure in a maternity ward. Further studies are necessary to explore light effects on mothers and substantiate study results on neonates.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2232  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light exposure at night and sleep quality in bipolar disorder: the APPLE cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders  
  Volume 257 Issue Pages 314-320  
  Keywords Human Health; mood disorders; Bipolar Disorder; Sleep; sleep efficiency; sleep quality  
  Abstract Background

Sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder (BD) is common and is associated with a risk for mood episode recurrence. Thus, it is important to identify factors that are related to sleep disturbance in BD. This cross-sectional study investigated the association between exposure to light at night (LAN) and sleep parameters in patients with BD.

Methods

The sleep parameters of 175 outpatients with BD were recorded using actigraphy at their homes for seven consecutive nights and were evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). The average LAN intensity in the bedroom during bedtime and rising time was measured using a portable photometer, and the participants were divided into two groups: “Light” (≥5 lux) and “Dark” (<5 lux). The association between LAN and sleep parameters was tested with multivariable analysis by adjusting for potential confounder such as age, gender, current smoker, mood state, day length, daytime light exposure, and sedative medications.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounder, the actigraphy sleep parameters showed significantly lower sleep efficiency (mean, 80.1% vs. 83.4%; p = 0.01), longer log-transformed sleep onset latency (2.9 vs. 2.6 min; p = 0.01), and greater wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs. 41.6 min; p = 0.02) in the Light group than in the Dark group. Whereas, there were no significant differences in the ISI scores between the groups.

Limitations

This was a cross-sectional study; therefore, the results do not necessarily imply that LAN causes sleep disturbance.

Conclusions

Reducing LAN exposure may contribute to improved sleep quality in patients with BD.
 
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital, Aichi, Japan; esakiz(at)fujita-hu.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2561  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Indoor light pollution and progression of carotid atherosclerosis: A longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environment International  
  Volume 133 Issue Pages 105184  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to light at inappropriate times in relation to the solar cycle can disturb circadian endocrine and metabolic rhythms. Previous studies have suggested an association between light exposure at night (LAN) and obesity, an important risk factor of atherosclerosis, although it remains unclear whether LAN associates with progression of atherosclerosis. To evaluate the longitudinal association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of carotid atherosclerosis, light intensity in the bedroom at baseline and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) at baseline and follow-up were measured in 989 elderly participants (945 at baseline and 780 at a median follow-up time of 34 months). The mean age of the participants was 71.4 ± 6.9 years. The average mean and maximal carotid IMT at baseline were 0.88 ± 0.15 and 1.10 ± 0.32 mm, respectively. The median intensity of bedroom LAN was 0.68 lx (IQR, 0.07–3.29). In multivariable analysis adjusted for potential confounders, the highest LAN group exhibited a significant increase in mean carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.028; 95% CI, 0.005–0.052; P = 0.019) compared with the lowest LAN quartile group. A similar relationship was found between LAN and maximal carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.083; 95% CI, 0.037–0.129; P < 0.001).

In conclusion, we found a clear and significant association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, which was independent of known risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, obesity, smoking, economic status, hypertension, and diabetes. Indoor light pollution may be a potential risk factor for atherosclerosis in the general population.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2706  
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