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Author (up) Atasever, M.; Bozkurt, Y.
Title Effect of Different Photoperiod Regimes on Sperm Quality, Fecundity and Fertilization in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Abbreviated Journal Turk. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.
Volume 15 Issue Pages 517-523
Keywords animals, fish, photoperiod, sperm, ovulation, fertilization, Oncorhynchus mykiss
Abstract The present study was carried out to determine effect of different photoperiod regimes on sperm quality parameters,

ovulation/spermiation time and hatchery performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) broodstock. The designation

was done as combination of different long and short photoperiod regimes such as: 18L:6D and 18D:6L (group I); 14L:10D

and 14D:10L (group II) and natural lighting (control group). All treatments were carried out as three replications at each

group.

As a result, the highest mean spermatozoa motility (83.0±2.1 %) and motility period (67.2±6.3 s) were determined in

control group. It was determined that the longest ovulation was occured in female rainbow trout broodstock at 265 days in

group I. Although the highest mean absolute egg productivity was determined as 3654.7±298.3 eggs/fish in group I, the

highest mean relative egg productivity was determined as 137.3±24.5 eggs/kg in control group. Furthermore, the highest mean

egg diameter (4.6±0.1 mm) and fertilization rate (87.0±2.5 %) were determined in control group. Statistical analyses revealed

that spermatozoa motility, spermatozoa motility period and spermatozoa density positively correlated with fertilization rate in

all photoperiod regimes (P>0.05). On the other hand, semen volume and semen pH negatively correlated with fertilization rate

in all photoperiod regimes (P>0.05). It is interesting to note that only statistically important positive correlation was

determined between relative fecundity and fertilization rate in 18L:6D/18D:6L photoperiod regime (r=0.452, P<0.05).

Consequently, results revealed that combined long and short artificial photoperiod regimes can advance ovulation and

spermiation and also can effect gamete quality and hatchery performance of rainbow trout during out-of-season spawning.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1570
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Author (up) Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.; Ferrari, M.J.; Grais, R.F.; Djibo, A.; Grenfell, B.T.
Title Explaining seasonal fluctuations of measles in Niger using nighttime lights imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1424-1427
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Cities; Emigration and Immigration; Epidemics; *Epidemiologic Methods; Humans; Light; Measles/*epidemiology/transmission; Niger/epidemiology; *Population Density; Remote Sensing Technology; *Seasons; Spacecraft
Abstract Measles epidemics in West Africa cause a significant proportion of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. Epidemics are strongly seasonal, but the drivers of these fluctuations are poorly understood, which limits the predictability of outbreaks and the dynamic response to immunization. We show that measles seasonality can be explained by spatiotemporal changes in population density, which we measure by quantifying anthropogenic light from satellite imagery. We find that measles transmission and population density are highly correlated for three cities in Niger. With dynamic epidemic models, we demonstrate that measures of population density are essential for predicting epidemic progression at the city level and improving intervention strategies. In addition to epidemiological applications, the ability to measure fine-scale changes in population density has implications for public health, crisis management, and economic development.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. nbharti@princeton.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22158822; PMCID:PMC3891598 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2770
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Author (up) Elvidge, C.; Zhizhin, M.; Hsu, F.-C.; Baugh, K.
Title VIIRS Nightfire: Satellite Pyrometry at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 5 Issue 9 Pages 4423-4449
Keywords SNPP; VIIRS; fire detection; gas flaring; biomass burning; fossil fuel carbon emissions
Abstract The Nightfire algorithm detects and characterizes sub-pixel hot sources using multispectral data collected globally, each night, by the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The spectral bands utilized span visible, near-infrared (NIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), and mid-wave infrared (MWIR). The primary detection band is in the SWIR, centered at 1.6 &#956;m. Without solar input, the SWIR spectral band records sensor noise, punctuated by high radiant emissions associated with gas flares, biomass burning, volcanoes, and industrial sites such as steel mills. Planck curve fitting of the hot source radiances yields temperature (K) and emission scaling factor (ESF). Additional calculations are done to estimate source size (m2), radiant heat intensity (W/m2), and radiant heat (MW). Use of the sensor noise limited M7, M8, and M10 spectral bands at night reduce scene background effects, which are widely reported for fire algorithms based on MWIR and long-wave infrared. High atmospheric transmissivity in the M10 spectral band reduces atmospheric effects on temperature and radiant heat retrievals. Nightfire retrieved temperature estimates for sub-pixel hot sources ranging from 600 to 6,000 K. An intercomparison study of biomass burning in Sumatra from June 2013 found Nightfire radiant heat (MW) to be highly correlated to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Fire Radiative Power (MW).
Address Earth Observation Group, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 199
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Author (up) Fonken, L.K.; Lieberman, R.A.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dim light at night exaggerates weight gain and inflammation associated with a high-fat diet in male mice Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Endocrinology
Volume 154 Issue 10 Pages 3817-3825
Keywords Adipose Tissue, White/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Animals; Antigens, CD11b/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Appetite Regulation/*radiation effects; Arcuate Nucleus/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Behavior, Animal/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm; Cytokines/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Diet, High-Fat/*adverse effects; Feeding Behavior/radiation effects; Gene Expression Regulation; Glucose Intolerance/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; I-kappa B Kinase/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Insulin Resistance; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Microglia/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Nerve Tissue Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Obesity/*etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Random Allocation; *Weight Gain
Abstract Elevated nighttime light exposure is associated with symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In industrialized societies, high-fat diet (HFD) and exposure to light at night (LAN) often cooccur and may contribute to the increasing obesity epidemic. Thus, we hypothesized that dim LAN (dLAN) would provoke additional and sustained body mass gain in mice on a HFD. Male mice were housed in either a standard light/dark cycle or dLAN and fed either chow or HFD. Exposure to dLAN and HFD increase weight gain, reduce glucose tolerance, and alter insulin secretion as compared with light/dark cycle and chow, respectively. The effects of dLAN and HFD appear additive, because mice exposed to dLAN that were fed HFD display the greatest increases in body mass. Exposure to both dLAN and HFD also change the timing of food intake and increase TNFalpha and MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue after 4 experimental weeks. Changes in MAC1 gene expression occur more rapidly due to HFD as compared with dLAN; after 5 days of experimental conditions, mice fed HFD already increase MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue. HFD also elevates microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and hypothalamic TNFalpha, IL-6, and Ikbkb gene expression. Microglia activation is increased by dLAN, but only among chow-fed mice and dLAN does not affect inflammatory gene expression. These results suggest that dLAN exaggerates weight gain and peripheral inflammation associated with HFD.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 636 Biomedical Research Tower, 460 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. fonken.1@osu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-7227 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23861373 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 93
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Author (up) Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V.
Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages 091006
Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light
Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.
Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727
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