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Author Atasever, M.; Bozkurt, Y.
Title Effect of Different Photoperiod Regimes on Sperm Quality, Fecundity and Fertilization in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Abbreviated Journal Turk. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.
Volume 15 Issue Pages 517-523
Keywords animals, fish, photoperiod, sperm, ovulation, fertilization, Oncorhynchus mykiss
Abstract The present study was carried out to determine effect of different photoperiod regimes on sperm quality parameters,

ovulation/spermiation time and hatchery performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) broodstock. The designation

was done as combination of different long and short photoperiod regimes such as: 18L:6D and 18D:6L (group I); 14L:10D

and 14D:10L (group II) and natural lighting (control group). All treatments were carried out as three replications at each

group.

As a result, the highest mean spermatozoa motility (83.0±2.1 %) and motility period (67.2±6.3 s) were determined in

control group. It was determined that the longest ovulation was occured in female rainbow trout broodstock at 265 days in

group I. Although the highest mean absolute egg productivity was determined as 3654.7±298.3 eggs/fish in group I, the

highest mean relative egg productivity was determined as 137.3±24.5 eggs/kg in control group. Furthermore, the highest mean

egg diameter (4.6±0.1 mm) and fertilization rate (87.0±2.5 %) were determined in control group. Statistical analyses revealed

that spermatozoa motility, spermatozoa motility period and spermatozoa density positively correlated with fertilization rate in

all photoperiod regimes (P>0.05). On the other hand, semen volume and semen pH negatively correlated with fertilization rate

in all photoperiod regimes (P>0.05). It is interesting to note that only statistically important positive correlation was

determined between relative fecundity and fertilization rate in 18L:6D/18D:6L photoperiod regime (r=0.452, P<0.05).

Consequently, results revealed that combined long and short artificial photoperiod regimes can advance ovulation and

spermiation and also can effect gamete quality and hatchery performance of rainbow trout during out-of-season spawning.
Address
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1570
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Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.; Ferrari, M.J.; Grais, R.F.; Djibo, A.; Grenfell, B.T.
Title Explaining seasonal fluctuations of measles in Niger using nighttime lights imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1424-1427
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Cities; Emigration and Immigration; Epidemics; *Epidemiologic Methods; Humans; Light; Measles/*epidemiology/transmission; Niger/epidemiology; *Population Density; Remote Sensing Technology; *Seasons; Spacecraft
Abstract Measles epidemics in West Africa cause a significant proportion of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. Epidemics are strongly seasonal, but the drivers of these fluctuations are poorly understood, which limits the predictability of outbreaks and the dynamic response to immunization. We show that measles seasonality can be explained by spatiotemporal changes in population density, which we measure by quantifying anthropogenic light from satellite imagery. We find that measles transmission and population density are highly correlated for three cities in Niger. With dynamic epidemic models, we demonstrate that measures of population density are essential for predicting epidemic progression at the city level and improving intervention strategies. In addition to epidemiological applications, the ability to measure fine-scale changes in population density has implications for public health, crisis management, and economic development.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. nbharti@princeton.edu
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22158822; PMCID:PMC3891598 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2770
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Author Chen, H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, R.; Cai, T.
Title Revisiting the environmental Kuznets curve for city-level CO2 emissions: based on corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume Issue Pages 121575
Keywords Remore Sensing; China; carbon emissions; CO2 emissions; night lights; NPP-VIIRS; VIIRS-DNB; VIIRS-DNB; Kuznets curve
Abstract With the increasing trend of global warming, the Chinese government faces tremendous pressure to reduce CO2 emissions. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure CO2 emissions at the city scale in China and examine the environmental Kuznets curve, thereby providing a reference for decision-making. Corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data were used to accurately estimate carbon dioxide emissions at the provincial and city scales in China. Then, based on the STRIPAT model, 291 cities in China were used to verify the environmental Kuznets curve. Our results show that on the provincial scale, the R2 between the estimated value and the statistical value of carbon dioxide reaches 0.85. Western cities in China emit more CO2, as do economically developed cities and industry- and mining-dominated cities. There are two CO2 emission hot spots in the north and one cold spot in the south. It was found that the environmental Kuznets curve on the city scale exists. This study has practical value in utilizing NPP-VIIRS data for the estimation of city CO2 emissions. The results also have academic value for determining factors that contribute to carbon dioxide emissions and can provide a reference for relevant decision makers. This study could be considered the first to simulate CO2 emissions at the provincial and city levels in China based on a NPP-VIIRS nighttime light model to explore the associated geographical distribution characteristics and potential influencing factors.
Address State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, 830011, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2917
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Author Chen, J.; Zhao, F.; Zeng, N.; Oda, T.
Title Comparing a global high-resolution downscaled fossil fuel CO2 emission dataset to local inventory-based estimates over 14 global cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Carbon Balance and Management Abbreviated Journal Carbon Balance Manag
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 9
Keywords Remote Sensing; City CO2 emissions; Emission inventory; Fossil fuel CO2 emissions; In-boundary; Odiac
Abstract BACKGROUND: Compilation of emission inventories (EIs) for cities is a whole new challenge to assess the subnational climate mitigation effort under the Paris Climate Agreement. Some cities have started compiling EIs, often following a global community protocol. However, EIs are often difficult to systematically examine because of the ways they were compiled (data collection and emission calculation) and reported (sector definition and direct vs consumption). In addition, such EI estimates are not readily applicable to objective evaluation using modeling and observations due to the lack of spatial emission extents. City emission estimates used in the science community are often based on downscaled gridded EIs, while the accuracy of the downscaled emissions at city level is not fully assessed. RESULTS: This study attempts to assess the utility of the downscaled emissions at city level. We collected EIs from 14 major global cities and compare them to the estimates from a global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emission data product (ODIAC) commonly used in the science research community. We made necessary adjustments to the estimates to make our comparison as reasonable as possible. We found that the two methods produce very close area-wide emission estimates for Shanghai and Delhi (< 10% difference), and reach good consistency in half of the cities examined (< 30% difference). The ODIAC dataset exhibits a much higher emission compared to inventory estimates in Cape Town (+ 148%), Sao Paulo (+ 43%) and Beijing (+ 40%), possibly related to poor correlation between nightlight intensity with human activity, such as the high-emission and low-lighting industrial parks in developing countries. On the other hand, ODIAC shows lower estimates in Manhattan (- 62%), New York City (- 45%), Washington D.C. (- 42%) and Toronto (- 33%), all located in North America, which may be attributable to an underestimation of residential emissions from heating in ODIAC's nightlight-based approach, and an overestimation of emission from ground transportation in registered vehicles statistics of inventory estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively good agreement suggests that the ODIAC data product could potentially be used as a first source for prior estimate of city-level CO2 emission, which is valuable for atmosphere CO2 inversion modeling and comparing with satellite CO2 observations. Our compilation of in-boundary emission estimates for 14 cities contributes towards establishing an accurate inventory in-boundary global city carbon emission dataset, necessary for accountable local climate mitigation policies in the future.
Address Goddard Earth Sciences Research and Technology, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1750-0680 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32430547 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2929
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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591
Keywords Remote Sensing; United Kingdom; National parks; skyglow; VIIRS-DNB; albedo; landcover; light emissions; light pollution; protected areas; skyglow; sky brightness; urbanization
Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK; d.t.c.cox(at )exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2920
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