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Author Elgert, C.; Hopkins, J.; Kaitala, A.; Candolin, U.
Title Reproduction under light pollution: maladaptive response to spatial variation in artificial light in a glow-worm Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B.
Volume 287 Issue 1931 Pages 20200806
Keywords Animals; glow-worms; Lampyris noctiluca; insects; maladaptive response; reproduction
Abstract (up) The amount of artificial light at night is growing worldwide, impacting the behaviour of nocturnal organisms. Yet, we know little about the consequences of these behavioural responses for individual fitness and population viability. We investigated if females of the common glow-worm Lampyris noctiluca—which glow in the night to attract males—mitigate negative effects of artificial light on mate attraction by adjusting the timing and location of glowing to spatial variation in light conditions. We found females do not move away from light when exposed to a gradient of artificial light, but delay or even refrain from glowing. Further, we demonstrate that this response is maladaptive, as our field study showed that staying still when exposed to artificial light from a simulated streetlight decreases mate attraction success, while moving only a short distance from the light source can markedly improve mate attraction. These results indicate that glow-worms are unable to respond to spatial variation in artificial light, which may be a factor in their global decline. Consequently, our results support the hypothesis that animals often lack adaptive behavioural responses to anthropogenic environmental changes and underlines the importance of considering behavioural responses when investigating the effects of human activities on wildlife.
Address Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; christina.elgert(at)helsinki.fi
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3049
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Author Gonzalez, S.A.; Yanez-Navea, K.; Munoz, M.
Title Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 83 Issue 1 Pages 265-274
Keywords Anthropogenic impact; Coastal urbanization index; Light pollution; Marine tenebrionid; Phaleria maculata; beetles; insects; urbanization; Chile; morphodynamics; Urbanization Index; indicator organisms
Abstract (up) The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an “Urbanization Index” based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.
Address Departamento de Biologia Marina, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 117, Coquimbo, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24768173 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 308
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Author Moser, J.C.; Reeve, J.D.; Bento, J.M.S.; Della Lucia, T.M.C.; Cameron, R.S.; Heck, N.M.
Title Eye size and behaviour of day- and night-flying leafcutting ant alates Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Zoology
Volume 264 Issue 1 Pages 69-75
Keywords Atta; leaf-cutting ants; nuptial flight; compound eye; ocelli; ommatidia; insects
Abstract (up) The morphology of insect eyes often seems to be shaped by evolution to match their behaviour and lifestyle. Here the relationship between the nuptial flight behaviour of 10 Atta species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the eye size of male and female alates, including the compound eyes, ommatidia facets, and ocelli were examined. These species can be divided into two distinct groups by nuptial flight behaviour: those that initiate the nuptial flight during the day and those that initiate it at night. The most striking difference between day- vs night-flying alates was in ocellus area, which was almost 50% larger in night-flying species. Night-flying species also had significantly larger ommatidia facets than day-flying species. A scaling relationship was also found between compound eye area, facet diameter, and ocellus area vs overall body size. Detailed observations are also presented on the nuptial flight behaviour of a night- vs day-flying species, A. texana and A. sexdens, respectively. The pattern in A. texana is for a single large and precisely timed nuptial flight before dawn, while flights of A. sexdens last for several hours, beginning at midday. Further observations suggest that the timing of the nuptial flight in A. texana is easily disrupted by light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 115
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Author Kim, K.‐N.; Sin, U.‐C.; Jo, Y.‐C.; Huang, Z.‐J.; Hassan, A.; Huang, Q.‐Y.; Lei, C.‐L.
Title Influence of green light at night on Juvenile hormone in the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Physiological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Entomol.
Volume 44 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-251
Keywords Animals; armyworm; Mythimna separata; Insects; Asia; green light
Abstract (up) The oriental armyworm Mythimna separata is an agricultural insect pest in Eastern Asia. Mythimna separata moths have a high phototactic response to green (520 nm) light. The biological characteristics of insects living under light of a specific wavelength at night can change and, accordingly, Juvenile hormone (JH) levels may be influenced by this light. The present study evaluates changes in the total JH levels at different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of M. separata reared under green light with different exposure periods at night (or dark period). The results show that, when the exposure time per day of the green light at night is extended, the JH levels in the final‐instar larvae (22 days) and older age pupae (8 days) are significantly reduced, and the JH levels in earlier age pupae (4 days) and adults (3, 6 and 9 days) are significantly increased, compared with groups not exposed to green light. Additionally, the JH level of male moths significantly differs from that of the female moths. We suggest that the JH level of M. separata insects could be regulated by the green light at night (or dark period). The findings of the present study will help to explain the relationship between the light environment and biological characteristics in nocturnal moths.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; ioir(at)mail.hzau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6962 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2596
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Author Degen, T.; Hovestadt, T.; Mitesser, O.; Hölker, F.
Title Altered sex-specific mortality and female mating success: ecological effects and evolutionary responses Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages e01820
Keywords Insects; nocturnal insects; mating behaviour
Abstract (up) Theory predicts that males and females should often join the mating pool at different times (sexual dimorphism in timing of emergence [SDT]) as the degree of SDT affects female mating success. We utilize an analytical model to explore (1) how important SDT is for female mating success, (2) how mating success might change if either sex's mortality (abruptly) increases, and (3) to what degree evolutionary responses in SDT may be able to mitigate the consequences of such mortality increase. Increasing male pre-mating mortality has a non-linear effect on the fraction of females mated: The effect is initially weak, but at some critical level a further increase in male mortality has a stronger effect than a similar increase in female mortality. Such a change is expected to impose selection for reduced SDT. Increasing mortality during the mating season has always a stronger effect on female mating success if the mortality affects the sex that emerges first. This bias results from the fact that enhancing mortality of the earlier emerging sex reduces femaleâ??male encounter rates. However, an evolutionary response in SDT may effectively mitigate such consequences. Further , if considered independently for females and males, the predicted evolutionary response in SDT could be quite dissimilar. The difference between female and male evolutionary response in SDT leads to marked differences in the fraction of fertilized females under certain conditions. Our model may provide general guidelines for improving harvesting of populations, conservation management of rare species under altered environmental conditions, or maintaining long-term efficiency of pest-control measures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1663
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