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Author (up) Kim, K.-N.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L.
Title Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: A review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Pest Management Science Abbreviated Journal Pest Manag Sci
Volume 75 Issue 12 Pages 3135-3143
Keywords Animals; review; Insects; Phototaxis; Integrated pest management
Abstract Many insects, especially nocturnal insects, exhibit positive phototaxis to artificial lights. Many light traps are currently used to monitor and manage insect pest populations, with light traps playing a crucial role in physical pest control. Efficient use of light traps to attract target insect pests becomes an important topic in application of integrated pest management (IPM). Phototactic responses of insects vary among species, light characteristics and the physiological status of the insects. In addition, light can cause several biological responses, including biochemical, physiological, molecular and fitness changes in insects. In this review, we discuss several hypotheses on insect phototaxis, affecting factors on insect phototaxis, insect sensitive wavelengths, biological responses of insects to light and countermeasures for conserving beneficial insects and increasing trapping effect. Additionally, we provide information on the different sensitivities to wavelengths causing positive phototactic behavior on more than 70 insect pest and beneficial insect species. The use of advanced light traps equipped with superior light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), will make physical pest control in IPM more efficient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1526-498X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251458 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2574
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Author (up) Kim, K.‐N.; Sin, U.‐C.; Jo, Y.‐C.; Huang, Z.‐J.; Hassan, A.; Huang, Q.‐Y.; Lei, C.‐L.
Title Influence of green light at night on Juvenile hormone in the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Physiological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Entomol.
Volume 44 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-251
Keywords Animals; armyworm; Mythimna separata; Insects; Asia; green light
Abstract The oriental armyworm Mythimna separata is an agricultural insect pest in Eastern Asia. Mythimna separata moths have a high phototactic response to green (520 nm) light. The biological characteristics of insects living under light of a specific wavelength at night can change and, accordingly, Juvenile hormone (JH) levels may be influenced by this light. The present study evaluates changes in the total JH levels at different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of M. separata reared under green light with different exposure periods at night (or dark period). The results show that, when the exposure time per day of the green light at night is extended, the JH levels in the final‐instar larvae (22 days) and older age pupae (8 days) are significantly reduced, and the JH levels in earlier age pupae (4 days) and adults (3, 6 and 9 days) are significantly increased, compared with groups not exposed to green light. Additionally, the JH level of male moths significantly differs from that of the female moths. We suggest that the JH level of M. separata insects could be regulated by the green light at night (or dark period). The findings of the present study will help to explain the relationship between the light environment and biological characteristics in nocturnal moths.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; ioir(at)mail.hzau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6962 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2596
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Author (up) Longcore, T.; Aldern, H.L.; Eggers, J.F.; Flores, S.; Franco, L.; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, E.; Petrinec, L.N.; Yan, W.A.; Barroso, A.M.
Title Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140125
Keywords Lighting; Animals; insects; light emitting diodes; LEDs; arthropods; Phototaxis; indoor lighting; vector-borne disease
Abstract Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods.
Address Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; longcore@usc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1122
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Author (up) Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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Author (up) Minnaar, C.; Boyles, J.G.; Minnaar, I.A.; Sole, C.L.; McKechnie, A.E.; McKenzie, A.
Title Stacking the odds: light pollution may shift the balance in an ancient predator-prey arms race Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol
Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 522-531
Keywords Ecology; animals; bats; insects; predation; Neoromicia capensis; moths; Cape serotine bat; co-evolution; eared moth; Lepidoptera; predator–prey interactions; prey selection
Abstract 1. Artificial night lighting threatens to disrupt strongly conserved light-dependent processes in animals and may have cascading effects on ecosystems as species interactions become altered. Insectivorous bats and their prey have been involved in a nocturnal, co-evolutionary arms race for millions of years. Lights may interfere with anti-bat defensive behaviours in moths, and disrupt a complex and globally ubiquitous interaction between bats and insects, ultimately leading to detrimental consequences for ecosystems on a global scale.

2. We combined experimental and mathematical approaches to determine effects of light pollution on a free-living bat–insect community. We compared prey selection by Cape serotine bats Neoromicia capensis in naturally unlit and artificially lit conditions using a manipulative field experiment, and developed a probabilistic model based on a suite of prey-selection factors to explain differences in observed diet.

3.Moth consumption by N. capensis was low under unlit conditions (mean percentage volume ± SD: 5·91 ± 6·25%), while moth consumption increased sixfold (mean percentage volume ± SD: 35·42 ± 17·90%) under lit conditions despite a decrease in relative moth abundance. Predictive prey-selection models that included high-efficacy estimates for eared-moth defensive behaviour found most support given diet data for bats in unlit conditions. Conversely, models that estimated eared-moth defensive behaviour as absent or low found more support given diet data for bats in lit conditions. Our models therefore suggest the increase in moth consumption was a result of light-induced, decreased eared-moth defensive behaviour.

4. Policy implications. In the current context of unyielding growth in global light pollution, we predict that specialist moth-eating bats and eared moths will face ever-increasing challenges to survival through increased resource competition and predation risk, respectively. Lights should be developed to be less attractive to moths, with the goal of reducing effects on moth behaviour. Unfortunately, market preference for broad-spectrum lighting and possible effects on other taxa make development of moth-friendly lighting improbable. Mitigation should therefore focus on the reduction of temporal, spatial and luminance redundancy in outdoor lighting. Restriction of light inside nature reserves and urban greenbelts can help maintain dark refugia for moth-eating bats and moths, and may become important for their persistence.
Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, South Africa
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1085
Permanent link to this record