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Author (up) Moser, J.C.; Reeve, J.D.; Bento, J.M.S.; Della Lucia, T.M.C.; Cameron, R.S.; Heck, N.M.
Title Eye size and behaviour of day- and night-flying leafcutting ant alates Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Zoology
Volume 264 Issue 1 Pages 69-75
Keywords Atta; leaf-cutting ants; nuptial flight; compound eye; ocelli; ommatidia; insects
Abstract The morphology of insect eyes often seems to be shaped by evolution to match their behaviour and lifestyle. Here the relationship between the nuptial flight behaviour of 10 Atta species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the eye size of male and female alates, including the compound eyes, ommatidia facets, and ocelli were examined. These species can be divided into two distinct groups by nuptial flight behaviour: those that initiate the nuptial flight during the day and those that initiate it at night. The most striking difference between day- vs night-flying alates was in ocellus area, which was almost 50% larger in night-flying species. Night-flying species also had significantly larger ommatidia facets than day-flying species. A scaling relationship was also found between compound eye area, facet diameter, and ocellus area vs overall body size. Detailed observations are also presented on the nuptial flight behaviour of a night- vs day-flying species, A. texana and A. sexdens, respectively. The pattern in A. texana is for a single large and precisely timed nuptial flight before dawn, while flights of A. sexdens last for several hours, beginning at midday. Further observations suggest that the timing of the nuptial flight in A. texana is easily disrupted by light pollution.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 115
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Author (up) Narendra, A.; Reid, S.F.; Raderschall, C.A.
Title Navigational efficiency of nocturnal Myrmecia ants suffers at low light levels Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e58801
Keywords Adaptation, Biological/*physiology; Animals; Ants/*physiology; Australian Capital Territory; *Cues; Geographic Information Systems; Homing Behavior/*physiology; *Light; Locomotion/*physiology; Orientation/*physiology; insects
Abstract Insects face the challenge of navigating to specific goals in both bright sun-lit and dim-lit environments. Both diurnal and nocturnal insects use quite similar navigation strategies. This is despite the signal-to-noise ratio of the navigational cues being poor at low light conditions. To better understand the evolution of nocturnal life, we investigated the navigational efficiency of a nocturnal ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, at different light levels. Workers of M. pyriformis leave the nest individually in a narrow light-window in the evening twilight to forage on nest-specific Eucalyptus trees. The majority of foragers return to the nest in the morning twilight, while few attempt to return to the nest throughout the night. We found that as light levels dropped, ants paused for longer, walked more slowly, the success in finding the nest reduced and their paths became less straight. We found that in both bright and dark conditions ants relied predominantly on visual landmark information for navigation and that landmark guidance became less reliable at low light conditions. It is perhaps due to the poor navigational efficiency at low light levels that the majority of foragers restrict navigational tasks to the twilight periods, where sufficient navigational information is still available.
Address ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. ajay.narendra@anu.edu.au
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23484052; PMCID:PMC3590162 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 117
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Author (up) Nwosu, L.C.; Nwosu, L.K.
Title Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Psyche: A Journal of Entomology Abbreviated Journal Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
Volume 2012 Issue Pages 1-4
Keywords insects; bugs; African giant water bug; Lethocerus indicus; Hemiptera; Belostomatidae
Abstract This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb) on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae). Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6%) than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41%) in 2008 [

&#119875; < 0 . 0 5

;

&#119875; ( &#119885; > 4 . 9 2 ) = 0 . 0 0 0 1

]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [

&#119875; > 0 . 0 5

;

&#119875;

(

&#119885; > 0 . 1 8 ) = 0 . 4 2 8 6

and

&#119885; > 0 . 2 8 = 0 . 3 8 9 7

]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 118
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Author (up) Picchi, M.S.; Avolio, L.; Azzani, L.; Brombin, O.; Camerini, G.
Title Fireflies and land use in an urban landscape: the case of Luciola italica L. (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the city of Turin Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Insect Conservation Abbreviated Journal J Insect Conserv
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 797-805
Keywords Turin; insects; Coleoptera Lampyridae; Luciola italica; Urban environment; Fireflies; Light pollution; Ecological corridors; Green areas; Po River; Italy
Abstract Research was carried out in the city of Turin (Northern Italy) in order to assess the suitability of the urban environment for fireflies.The study started in 2007 with an artistic and scientific project promoted by Parco Arte Vivente (PAV—Park of living art). Citizens joining the project recorded 18 areas where they could observe fireflies, which were identified as Luciola italica L. (Coleoptera Lampyridae). All of the 18 areas recorded by citizens were then visited during the summer of 2009 and the abundance of L. italica was estimated using transects. In 12 sites the presence of the firefly was confirmed. The habitat structures of L. italica were woods interspersed with clearings in the urban districts in the hills, and parks along rivers in the lower and more populated part of the city. In sites where fireflies were observed, the level of illuminance measured was significantly lower than in areas where L. italica was absent. The analysis of the landscape around the study areas showed a negative correlation between the extent of urbanization and fireflies abundance. Survival of L. italica populations in the urban area of Turin is influenced by the extent of green areas and the level of artificial illumination. Parks lying among rivers preserve a level of darkness suitable for fireflies and are connected by woody strips growing along the banks of rivers, that probably function as ecological corridors.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1366-638X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 108
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Author (up) Reddy, L.; Reddy, V.; Hemanth, S.; Prasad, P.
Title Modelling and Optimization of Solar Light Trap For “Reducing and Controlling” The Pest Population Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Engr. Tech., Man. & Appl. Sci.
Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 224-234
Keywords Animals; insects; India; Madanapalli; Chittor; Andhra Pradesh; moonlight; polarization
Abstract Reducing and controlling the pest population using light traps is an age old practice in our crop sector. Though there are several models and designs are available but we would plan to develop something that could be solar powered trap with collecting net and not dependent on any other source like wind power, mechanical power, fuel & electricity. This device operates automatically, turning on the light during light fails i.e., 6 P.M and turns off before sunrises i.e., 6A.M. Most of the damage causing insects are active only during that time. Installing one light trap in an acre attracts at least more than 1000 adult pests for a day. The insects attract solar light trap model had been tested in our field crops like vegetables, paddy, and sugarcane, fruit crops like mango, pomegranate, guava, coconut and tea, coffee and jasmine crops across India. In this study we examine the relationship between the Lunar Phases and the efficiency of light traps in catching pests in the month of March and April at Madanapalli, Chittor, Andhra Pradesh. The lunar phase depending on the polarized moonlight and the relative catch follow the collecting distance. The collecting distance ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The study demonstrated for the first time the effect of increasing polarized moonlight in the first and last quarter on the flying activity of pests. Catching quantity depend on the connection with the collecting distance when is the greatest of collection distance.
Address Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVTM (J.N.T.U.A) Angallu, Madanapalli ,Chittor (Dist), A.P., India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IJETMAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1161
Permanent link to this record