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Author (up) Gonzalez, S.A.; Yanez-Navea, K.; Munoz, M.
Title Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 83 Issue 1 Pages 265-274
Keywords Anthropogenic impact; Coastal urbanization index; Light pollution; Marine tenebrionid; Phaleria maculata; beetles; insects; urbanization; Chile; morphodynamics; Urbanization Index; indicator organisms
Abstract The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an “Urbanization Index” based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.
Address Departamento de Biologia Marina, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 117, Coquimbo, Chile
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24768173 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 308
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Author (up) Hamilton, J.
Title Electric Light Captures Type Journal Article
Year 1889 Publication Psyche Abbreviated Journal Psyche
Volume 5 Issue 153 Pages 149-150
Keywords Animals; Ecology; artificial light; Calosoma scrutator; Calosoma willcoxi; Calosoma externum; Diplochila major; Polymoechus brevipes; Erycus puncticollis; Cybister fimbirolatus; Dytiscus fasciventrus; Hydrophilus trangularis; Belostoma americanum; beetles; hemiptera; insects; coleoptera; water beetles; urban; cities
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1273
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Author (up) Henn, M.; Nichols, H.; Zhang, Y.; Bonner, T.H.
Title Effect of artificial light on the drift of aquatic insects in urban central Texas streams Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Freshwater Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Freshwater Ecology
Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 307-318
Keywords light pollution; stream ecology; urban ecology; drift; abiotic factors; Baetidae; Chironomidae; insects; Texas; Simuliidae; Edwards Plateau; light at night; ecology
Abstract Light pollution can reduce night time drift of larval aquatic insects in urban streams by disrupting their circadian rhythms. Previous studies on larval insect drift show that disruption in drift leads to changes in reproduction as well as intraspecific and interspecific interactions. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the effects of extreme artificial light on insect drift in urbanized, high clarity spring systems of the karst Edwards Plateau, TX. We quantified taxa richness, diversity, and abundance in aquatic insect night time drift under two treatments (ambient night time light and artificial light addition) and among five streams using a paired design. Richness and diversity of drifting aquatic insects were similar between treatments but abundance was 37% less in the light addition treatment than that of the control. Effects of light addition on mean abundance was more notable in large streams with a 58% decrease in Simuliidae (compared to that of the control) and 51% decrease in Baetidae. Reduced drift from light addition suggests the potential of artificial lighting disrupting insect drift and consequently community structure. Results of this experiment support a growing body of knowledge on how urbanized systems influence stream communities.
Address Department of Biology/Aquatic Station, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0270-5060 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 312
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Author (up) Johansen, N.S.; Vänninen, I.; Pinto, D.M.; Nissinen, A.I.; Shipp, L.
Title In the light of new greenhouse technologies: 2. Direct effects of artificial lighting on arthropods and integrated pest management in greenhouse crops Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 159 Issue 1 Pages 1-27
Keywords Behaviour; biology; insects; light intensity; mites; photobiology; photoperiod; photoreceptors; plant protection; visual ecology; wavelength distribution
Abstract Novel lighting technology offers the possibility of improved arthropod integrated pest management (IPM) in artificially lighted crops. This review compiles the current knowledge on how greenhouse pest and beneficial arthropods are directly affected by light, with the focus on whiteflies. The effect of ultraviolet depletion on orientation and colour-coded phototaxis are to some extent studied and utilised for control of the flying adult stage of some pest species, but far less is known about the visual ecology of commercially used biological control agents and pollinators, and about how light affects arthropod biology in different life stages. Four approaches for utilisation of artificial light in IPM of whiteflies are suggested: (a) use of attractive visual stimuli incorporated into traps for monitoring and direct control, (b) use of visual stimuli that disrupt the host-detection process, (c) radiation with harmful or inhibitory wavelengths to kill or suppress pest populations and (d) use of time cues to manipulate daily rhythms and photoperiodic responses. Knowledge gaps are identified to design a road map for research on IPM in crops lighted with high-pressure sodium lamps, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photoselective films. LEDs are concluded to offer possibilities for behavioural manipulation of arthropods, but the extent of such possibilities depends in practice on which wavelength combinations are determined to be optimal for plant production. Furthermore, the direct effects of artificial lighting on IPM must be studied in the context of plant-mediated effects of artificial light on arthropods, as both types of manipulations are possible, particularly with LEDs.
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ISSN 0003-4746 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 112
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Author (up) Kelber, A.
Title Light intensity limits foraging activity in nocturnal and crepuscular bees Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 63-72
Keywords bees; eyes; foraging; insects; ocelli; sensitivity; visual ecology
Abstract A crepuscular or nocturnal lifestyle has evolved in bees several times independently, probably to explore rewarding pollen sources without competition and to minimize predation and nest parasites. Despite these obvious advantages, only few bee species are nocturnal. Here we show that the sensitivity of the bee apposition eye is a major factor limiting the ability to forage in dim light. We present data on eye size, foraging times, and light levels for Megalopta genalis (Augochlorini, Halictidae) in Panama, and Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) sp. (Halictini, Halictidae) in Utah, USA. M. genalis females forage exclusively during twilight, but as a result of dim light levels in the rain forest, they are adapted to extremely low intensities. The likely factor limiting their foraging activity is finding their nest entrance on return from a foraging trip. The lowest light intensity at which they can do this, both in the morning and the evening, is 0.0001 cd m−2. Therefore, they leave the nest at dimmer light levels in the morning than in the evening. Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) foraging is limited by light intensity in the evening, but probably by temperature in the morning in the temperate climate of Utah. We propose that the evolution of nocturnality in bees was favored by the large variance in the size of females.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 119
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