|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Reddy, L.; Reddy, V.; Hemanth, S.; Prasad, P.
Title Modelling and Optimization of Solar Light Trap For “Reducing and Controlling” The Pest Population Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Engr. Tech., Man. & Appl. Sci.
Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 224-234
Keywords (up) Animals; insects; India; Madanapalli; Chittor; Andhra Pradesh; moonlight; polarization
Abstract Reducing and controlling the pest population using light traps is an age old practice in our crop sector. Though there are several models and designs are available but we would plan to develop something that could be solar powered trap with collecting net and not dependent on any other source like wind power, mechanical power, fuel & electricity. This device operates automatically, turning on the light during light fails i.e., 6 P.M and turns off before sunrises i.e., 6A.M. Most of the damage causing insects are active only during that time. Installing one light trap in an acre attracts at least more than 1000 adult pests for a day. The insects attract solar light trap model had been tested in our field crops like vegetables, paddy, and sugarcane, fruit crops like mango, pomegranate, guava, coconut and tea, coffee and jasmine crops across India. In this study we examine the relationship between the Lunar Phases and the efficiency of light traps in catching pests in the month of March and April at Madanapalli, Chittor, Andhra Pradesh. The lunar phase depending on the polarized moonlight and the relative catch follow the collecting distance. The collecting distance ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The study demonstrated for the first time the effect of increasing polarized moonlight in the first and last quarter on the flying activity of pests. Catching quantity depend on the connection with the collecting distance when is the greatest of collection distance.
Address Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVTM (J.N.T.U.A) Angallu, Madanapalli ,Chittor (Dist), A.P., India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IJETMAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1161
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Burkett, D.A.; Butler, J.F.
Title Laboratory Evaluation of Colored Light as an Attractant for Female Aedes Aegypti, Aedes Albopictus, Anopheles Quadrimaculatus, and Culex Nigripalpus Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication The Florida Entomologist Abbreviated Journal Florida Entomologist
Volume 88 Issue 4 Pages 383-389
Keywords (up) Animals; insects; mosquito; visualometer; Aedes albopictus; Aedes aegypti; Anopheles quadrimaculatus; Culex nigripalpus; Feeding Behavior
Abstract Mosquito feeding activity was monitored in an electronic apparatus (visualometer), having ten ports, illuminated from below with narrow bandwidths of light (700, 650, 600, 550, 500, 450, 400, or 350 nm). Responses of adult female Aedes albopictus Skuse, Ae. aegypti (L.), Anopheles quadrimaculatus, Say and Culex nigripalpus Theobald to feeding stations (blood containers) over each light port. No-light and broad spectrum white light were used as controls. Color preferences were based on electronic detection of feeding times. Aedes aegypti showed no significant feeding preferences over any of the colors. Conversely, Ae. albopictus, An. quadrimaculatus, and Cx. nigripalpus showed preferences for several of the wavelengths of light. In decreasing order, Aedes albopictus fed significantly longer at 600 nm, 500 nm, white, 450 nm, 400 nm, and black. For An. quadrimaculatus, significantly longer feeding durations were found over the black or white controls and all other individual wavelengths had significantly longer feeding durations than 350 nm. Finally, in decreasing order, significantly greater feeding times were recorded for Cx. nigripalpus over 500 nm, 600 nm, 450 nm, white, 650 nm, and 550 nm compared to the other wavelengths tested.
Address Range Operations Environmental ACC/DOPP HQACC-Ranges, Airfields & Airspace Ops; douglas.burkett(at)langley.af.mil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Florida Entomological Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1938-5102 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1368
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schroer, S., Häffner, E., & Hölker, F.
Title Impact of artificial illumination on the development of a leafmining moth in urban trees Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal Intl J of Sustainable Lighting
Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 1-10
Keywords (up) Animals; Insects; Moths; horse-chestnut leafminer; Cameraria ohridella
Abstract Light emission from street lighting or other light sources alters the living conditions for organisms in urban areas. Nowadays, the impact of light at night (ALAN) on urban plants and their trophic environment is not well understood. To gain more insight about herbivore plant’s interaction when exposed to ALAN, outdoor and greenhouse tests were conducted using the horse-chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella, as a test organism due to its adaptive behavior. At the end of the season, the development of chestnut tree leaves and the leafminer were measured at illuminated versus non-illuminated sites in the city of Berlin and the rural area of Brandenburg. Illuminated leaves were larger than those grown in darker rural areas and, extended larval activity was recorded. Additionally, in the greenhouse, infested chestnut seedlings were exposed to two different light regimes; one treatment provided continuous illumination and the other short daylight conditions. After only one week, the mine size was lower on illuminated seedlings, presumably due to reduced leaf senescence. The leafminer developed a lower proportion of diapausing pupae and a higher proportion of free pupae, which leads to a further generation within the season. The results indicate a strong impact of ALAN on plant metabolism, a secondary effect on leafminer development and its larval activity. For urban trees, the consequence might be an increased herbivore / parasite pressure. For herbivores and parasites less adapted to winter damages than the invasive leafminer a reduced dormancy due to direct or indirect effects of ALAN could even threat the population.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwat Erecology and Inland Fisheries
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2634
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Allema, A.B.; Rossing, A.H.; van der Werf, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bukovinszky, T.; Steingröver, E.; van Lenteren, C.
Title Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Applied Entomology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 136 Issue 10 Pages 793–800
Keywords (up) Animals; insects; movement activity; movement behaviour; movement speed; red light sensitivity; resting behaviour
Abstract Behaviour of nocturnal insects is routinely observed under red light, but it is unclear how the behaviour under red light compares to behaviour in complete darkness, or under a source of white light. Here, we measure movement behaviour of the nocturnal carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using camera recording under a near-infrared (nir), red or white radiation source. Red light significantly reduced movement speed in females similar to the effect of white light and different from nir. Also movement activity and pause length were affected by radiation source, with a significant difference between nir and white light, and with intermediate values in red light. The results presented here indicate that P. melanarius has different movement behaviour under the three radiation sources and suggest that nir rather than red radiation is most appropriate for measuring behaviour in total darkness. However, in the field total darkness is rare both because of natural light sources such as the moon and stars but increasingly also because of ecological light pollution, and therefore red light may still be of use for observing ecologically and practically relevant natural night-time behaviour.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 385
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Foster, J.J.; Kirwan, J.D.; El Jundi, B.; Smolka, J.; Khaldy, L.; Baird, E.; Byrne, M.J.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Johnsen, S.; Dacke, M.
Title Orienting to polarized light at night – matching lunar skylight to performance in a nocturnal beetle Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol
Volume 222 Issue Pt 2 Pages jeb188532
Keywords (up) Animals; Natural skylight; insects; South African dung beetle; Escarabaeus satyrus; polarized light; Orientation
Abstract For polarized light to inform behaviour, the typical range of degrees of polarization observable in the animal's natural environment must be above the threshold for detection and interpretation. Here, we present the first investigation of the degree of linear polarization threshold for orientation behaviour in a nocturnal species, with specific reference to the range of degrees of polarization measured in the night sky. An effect of lunar phase on the degree of polarization of skylight was found, with smaller illuminated fractions of the moon's surface corresponding to lower degrees of polarization in the night sky. We found that the South African dung beetle Escarabaeus satyrus can orient to polarized light for a range of degrees of polarization similar to that observed in diurnal insects, reaching a lower threshold between 0.04 and 0.32, possibly as low as 0.11. For degrees of polarization lower than 0.23, as measured on a crescent moon night, orientation performance was considerably weaker than that observed for completely linearly polarized stimuli, but was nonetheless stronger than in the absence of polarized light.
Address Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, Lund University, Solvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30530838 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2599
Permanent link to this record