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Author Costin, K.J.; Boulton, A.M.
Title A Field Experiment on the Effect of Introduced Light Pollution on Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) in the Piedmont Region of Maryland Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Coleopterists Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Coleopterists Bulletin
Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages 84-86
Keywords Animals; insects; fireflies; Coleoptera; Lampyridae; Coleoptera Lampyridae; artificial light at night; ecology; light pollution
Abstract (none)
Address Environmental Biology Hood College 401 Rosemont Avenue Frederick, MD 21701, U.S.A.; kjc(at)hood.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-065X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1406
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Author Ashfaq, M.; Khanam, S.; Khan, M.; Rasheed, F.; Hafeez, S.
Title Insect orientation to various color lights in the agricultural biomes of Faisalabad Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Pakistan Entomologist Abbreviated Journal Pak Entomol
Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 49-52
Keywords Animals; Insects; Faisalabad; Pakistan; Diptera; Coleoptera; Lepidoptera
Abstract This experiment was conducted in the area of Punjab Agriculture Research Station (PARS) and Chak No.33 JB Faisalabad to evaluate the response insects to varying wavelengths of light. During experiment, lights of six different colors (blue, green, yellow, red, black and white) were tested. All lights were arranged in a line on agriculture land, close to Faisalabad Airport. Tree rows/blocks, forest nursery, fruit garden, wheat, maize and fodder crops were the main vegetative covers in the vicinity. Each selected color light was properly projected on 1 m^2

vertical screen (made of white cotton fabric) placed one meter high above the ground. All lights were kept on simultaneously for half an hour and the insects attracted on both sides of the screens were collected in tubs containing soapy water. At the end of experiment, the collection was shifted to properly labeled storage bottles for counting and identification into respective orders. The

highest number of insects was observed in container placed under black light (ultraviolet light), while the lowest in that of red light. Similarly, the common insect orders frequented among all color lights were Diptera, Coleoptera and

Lepidoptera respectively. The experimental results indicated that insects are attracted in more number on lights with short wavelengths and high frequencies and vice a versa.
Address Department of Agri Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Pakistan Entomological Society Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1017-1827 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1477
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Author Kim, K.‐N.; Sin, U.‐C.; Jo, Y.‐C.; Huang, Z.‐J.; Hassan, A.; Huang, Q.‐Y.; Lei, C.‐L.
Title Influence of green light at night on Juvenile hormone in the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Physiological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Entomol.
Volume 44 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-251
Keywords Animals; armyworm; Mythimna separata; Insects; Asia; green light
Abstract The oriental armyworm Mythimna separata is an agricultural insect pest in Eastern Asia. Mythimna separata moths have a high phototactic response to green (520 nm) light. The biological characteristics of insects living under light of a specific wavelength at night can change and, accordingly, Juvenile hormone (JH) levels may be influenced by this light. The present study evaluates changes in the total JH levels at different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of M. separata reared under green light with different exposure periods at night (or dark period). The results show that, when the exposure time per day of the green light at night is extended, the JH levels in the final‐instar larvae (22 days) and older age pupae (8 days) are significantly reduced, and the JH levels in earlier age pupae (4 days) and adults (3, 6 and 9 days) are significantly increased, compared with groups not exposed to green light. Additionally, the JH level of male moths significantly differs from that of the female moths. We suggest that the JH level of M. separata insects could be regulated by the green light at night (or dark period). The findings of the present study will help to explain the relationship between the light environment and biological characteristics in nocturnal moths.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; ioir(at)mail.hzau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6962 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2596
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Author Bailey, L.A.; Brigham, R.M.; Bohn, S.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Smit, B.
Title An experimental test of the allotonic frequency hypothesis to isolate the effects of light pollution on bat prey selection Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 190 Issue 2 Pages 367–374
Keywords Animals; Ecology; bats; moths; insects; mammals
Abstract Artificial lights may be altering interactions between bats and moth prey. According to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH), eared moths are generally unavailable as prey for syntonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies between 20 and 50 kHz within the hearing range of eared moths) due to the moths' ability to detect syntonic bat echolocation. Syntonic bats therefore feed mainly on beetles, flies, true bugs, and non-eared moths. The AFH is expected to be violated around lights where eared moths are susceptible to exploitation by syntonic bats because moths' evasive strategies become less effective. The hypothesis has been tested to date almost exclusively in areas with permanent lighting, where the effects of lights on bat diets are confounded with other aspects of human habitat alteration. We undertook diet analysis in areas with short-term, localized artificial lighting to isolate the effects of artificial lighting and determine if syntonic and allotonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies outside the hearing range of eared moths) consumed more moths under conditions of artificial lights than in natural darkness. We found that syntonic bats increased their consumption of moth prey under experimentally lit conditions, likely owing to a reduction in the ability of eared moths to evade the bats. Eared moths may increase in diets of generalist syntonic bats foraging around artificial light sources, as opposed to allotonic species and syntonic species with a more specialized diet.
Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. b.smit@ru.ac.za
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31139944 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2511
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Author Kim, K.-N.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L.
Title Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: A review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Pest Management Science Abbreviated Journal Pest Manag Sci
Volume 75 Issue 12 Pages 3135-3143
Keywords Animals; review; Insects; Phototaxis; Integrated pest management
Abstract Many insects, especially nocturnal insects, exhibit positive phototaxis to artificial lights. Many light traps are currently used to monitor and manage insect pest populations, with light traps playing a crucial role in physical pest control. Efficient use of light traps to attract target insect pests becomes an important topic in application of integrated pest management (IPM). Phototactic responses of insects vary among species, light characteristics and the physiological status of the insects. In addition, light can cause several biological responses, including biochemical, physiological, molecular and fitness changes in insects. In this review, we discuss several hypotheses on insect phototaxis, affecting factors on insect phototaxis, insect sensitive wavelengths, biological responses of insects to light and countermeasures for conserving beneficial insects and increasing trapping effect. Additionally, we provide information on the different sensitivities to wavelengths causing positive phototactic behavior on more than 70 insect pest and beneficial insect species. The use of advanced light traps equipped with superior light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), will make physical pest control in IPM more efficient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1526-498X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251458 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2574
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