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Author Reddy, L.; Reddy, V.; Hemanth, S.; Prasad, P. url  openurl
  Title Modelling and Optimization of Solar Light Trap For “Reducing and Controlling” The Pest Population Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication (up) International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Engr. Tech., Man. & Appl. Sci.  
  Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 224-234  
  Keywords Animals; insects; India; Madanapalli; Chittor; Andhra Pradesh; moonlight; polarization  
  Abstract Reducing and controlling the pest population using light traps is an age old practice in our crop sector. Though there are several models and designs are available but we would plan to develop something that could be solar powered trap with collecting net and not dependent on any other source like wind power, mechanical power, fuel & electricity. This device operates automatically, turning on the light during light fails i.e., 6 P.M and turns off before sunrises i.e., 6A.M. Most of the damage causing insects are active only during that time. Installing one light trap in an acre attracts at least more than 1000 adult pests for a day. The insects attract solar light trap model had been tested in our field crops like vegetables, paddy, and sugarcane, fruit crops like mango, pomegranate, guava, coconut and tea, coffee and jasmine crops across India. In this study we examine the relationship between the Lunar Phases and the efficiency of light traps in catching pests in the month of March and April at Madanapalli, Chittor, Andhra Pradesh. The lunar phase depending on the polarized moonlight and the relative catch follow the collecting distance. The collecting distance ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The study demonstrated for the first time the effect of increasing polarized moonlight in the first and last quarter on the flying activity of pests. Catching quantity depend on the connection with the collecting distance when is the greatest of collection distance.  
  Address Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVTM (J.N.T.U.A) Angallu, Madanapalli ,Chittor (Dist), A.P., India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IJETMAS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1161  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schroer, S., Häffner, E., & Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial illumination on the development of a leafmining moth in urban trees Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal Intl J of Sustainable Lighting  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Animals; Insects; Moths; horse-chestnut leafminer; Cameraria ohridella  
  Abstract Light emission from street lighting or other light sources alters the living conditions for organisms in urban areas. Nowadays, the impact of light at night (ALAN) on urban plants and their trophic environment is not well understood. To gain more insight about herbivore plant’s interaction when exposed to ALAN, outdoor and greenhouse tests were conducted using the horse-chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella, as a test organism due to its adaptive behavior. At the end of the season, the development of chestnut tree leaves and the leafminer were measured at illuminated versus non-illuminated sites in the city of Berlin and the rural area of Brandenburg. Illuminated leaves were larger than those grown in darker rural areas and, extended larval activity was recorded. Additionally, in the greenhouse, infested chestnut seedlings were exposed to two different light regimes; one treatment provided continuous illumination and the other short daylight conditions. After only one week, the mine size was lower on illuminated seedlings, presumably due to reduced leaf senescence. The leafminer developed a lower proportion of diapausing pupae and a higher proportion of free pupae, which leads to a further generation within the season. The results indicate a strong impact of ALAN on plant metabolism, a secondary effect on leafminer development and its larval activity. For urban trees, the consequence might be an increased herbivore / parasite pressure. For herbivores and parasites less adapted to winter damages than the invasive leafminer a reduced dormancy due to direct or indirect effects of ALAN could even threat the population.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwat Erecology and Inland Fisheries  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2634  
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Author Minnaar, C.; Boyles, J.G.; Minnaar, I.A.; Sole, C.L.; McKechnie, A.E.; McKenzie, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Stacking the odds: light pollution may shift the balance in an ancient predator-prey arms race Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication (up) Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 522-531  
  Keywords Ecology; animals; bats; insects; predation; Neoromicia capensis; moths; Cape serotine bat; co-evolution; eared moth; Lepidoptera; predator–prey interactions; prey selection  
  Abstract 1. Artificial night lighting threatens to disrupt strongly conserved light-dependent processes in animals and may have cascading effects on ecosystems as species interactions become altered. Insectivorous bats and their prey have been involved in a nocturnal, co-evolutionary arms race for millions of years. Lights may interfere with anti-bat defensive behaviours in moths, and disrupt a complex and globally ubiquitous interaction between bats and insects, ultimately leading to detrimental consequences for ecosystems on a global scale.

2. We combined experimental and mathematical approaches to determine effects of light pollution on a free-living bat–insect community. We compared prey selection by Cape serotine bats Neoromicia capensis in naturally unlit and artificially lit conditions using a manipulative field experiment, and developed a probabilistic model based on a suite of prey-selection factors to explain differences in observed diet.

3.Moth consumption by N. capensis was low under unlit conditions (mean percentage volume ± SD: 5·91 ± 6·25%), while moth consumption increased sixfold (mean percentage volume ± SD: 35·42 ± 17·90%) under lit conditions despite a decrease in relative moth abundance. Predictive prey-selection models that included high-efficacy estimates for eared-moth defensive behaviour found most support given diet data for bats in unlit conditions. Conversely, models that estimated eared-moth defensive behaviour as absent or low found more support given diet data for bats in lit conditions. Our models therefore suggest the increase in moth consumption was a result of light-induced, decreased eared-moth defensive behaviour.

4. Policy implications. In the current context of unyielding growth in global light pollution, we predict that specialist moth-eating bats and eared moths will face ever-increasing challenges to survival through increased resource competition and predation risk, respectively. Lights should be developed to be less attractive to moths, with the goal of reducing effects on moth behaviour. Unfortunately, market preference for broad-spectrum lighting and possible effects on other taxa make development of moth-friendly lighting improbable. Mitigation should therefore focus on the reduction of temporal, spatial and luminance redundancy in outdoor lighting. Restriction of light inside nature reserves and urban greenbelts can help maintain dark refugia for moth-eating bats and moths, and may become important for their persistence.
 
  Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, South Africa  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1085  
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Author Allema, A.B.; Rossing, A.H.; van der Werf, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bukovinszky, T.; Steingröver, E.; van Lenteren, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Journal of Applied Entomology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 136 Issue 10 Pages 793–800  
  Keywords Animals; insects; movement activity; movement behaviour; movement speed; red light sensitivity; resting behaviour  
  Abstract Behaviour of nocturnal insects is routinely observed under red light, but it is unclear how the behaviour under red light compares to behaviour in complete darkness, or under a source of white light. Here, we measure movement behaviour of the nocturnal carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae) using camera recording under a near-infrared (nir), red or white radiation source. Red light significantly reduced movement speed in females similar to the effect of white light and different from nir. Also movement activity and pause length were affected by radiation source, with a significant difference between nir and white light, and with intermediate values in red light. The results presented here indicate that P. melanarius has different movement behaviour under the three radiation sources and suggest that nir rather than red radiation is most appropriate for measuring behaviour in total darkness. However, in the field total darkness is rare both because of natural light sources such as the moon and stars but increasingly also because of ecological light pollution, and therefore red light may still be of use for observing ecologically and practically relevant natural night-time behaviour.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smit, B.; Boyles, J.G.; Brigham, R.M.; McKechnie, A.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Torpor in dark times: patterns of heterothermy are associated with the lunar cycle in a nocturnal bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication (up) Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 241-248  
  Keywords Animals; *Biological Clocks; Birds/*physiology; *Body Temperature Regulation; Ecosystem; *Feeding Behavior; Insects; *Moon; Seasons; South Africa  
  Abstract Many studies have shown that endotherms become more heterothermic when the costs of thermoregulation are high and/or when limited energy availability constrains thermoregulatory capacity. However, the roles of many ecological variables, including constraints on foraging opportunities and/or success, remain largely unknown. To test the prediction that thermoregulatory patterns should be related to foraging opportunities in a heterothermic endotherm, we examined the relationship between the lunar cycle and heterothermy in Freckled Nightjars (Caprimulgus tristigma), which are visually orienting, nocturnal insectivores that are dependent on ambient light to forage. This model system provides an opportunity to assess whether variation in foraging opportunities influences the expression of heterothermy. The nightjars were active and foraged for insects when moonlight was available but became inactive and heterothermic in the absence of moonlight. Lunar illumination was a much stronger predictor of the magnitude of heterothermic responses than was air temperature (T(a)). Our data suggest that heterothermy was strongly related to variation in foraging opportunities associated with the lunar cycle, even though food abundance appeared to remain relatively high throughout the study period. Patterns of thermoregulation in this population of Freckled Nightjars provide novel insights into the environmental and ecological determinants of heterothermy, with the lunar cycle, and not T(a), being the strongest predictor of torpor use.  
  Address DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. smitbe@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21628551 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 59  
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