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Author Tauc, M.J.; Fristrup, K.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Shaw, J.A.
Title Field demonstration of a wing-beat modulation lidar for the 3D mapping of flying insects Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication OSA Continuum Abbreviated Journal (up) OSA Continuum
Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 332
Keywords Instrumentation; Animals
Abstract We describe a wing-beat modulation lidar system designed for the 3D mapping of flying insects in ecological or entomological studies. To better understand the signals from this instrument, we analyzed simulated signals to identify how they were affected by various imperfections, such as variations in the spacing and amplitude of each individual wing-beat reflection. In addition, a radiometric model was used to estimate signal-to-noise ratio to gain insight into the relationships between the optical system design and insect parameters (e.g., wing size, reflectivity, or diffusivity).
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ISSN 2578-7519 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2209
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville, A.M. 2nd; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D.
Title An estimate of avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal (up) PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages e34025
Keywords Ecology; Accidents/*statistics & numerical data; Altitude; Animals; Birds/*injuries; Canada; Computer Communication Networks/*instrumentation; Conservation of Natural Resources/*statistics & numerical data; *Flight, Animal; *Mortality; Regression Analysis; United States
Abstract Avian mortality at communication towers in the continental United States and Canada is an issue of pressing conservation concern. Previous estimates of this mortality have been based on limited data and have not included Canada. We compiled a database of communication towers in the continental United States and Canada and estimated avian mortality by tower with a regression relating avian mortality to tower height. This equation was derived from 38 tower studies for which mortality data were available and corrected for sampling effort, search efficiency, and scavenging where appropriate. Although most studies document mortality at guyed towers with steady-burning lights, we accounted for lower mortality at towers without guy wires or steady-burning lights by adjusting estimates based on published studies. The resulting estimate of mortality at towers is 6.8 million birds per year in the United States and Canada. Bootstrapped subsampling indicated that the regression was robust to the choice of studies included and a comparison of multiple regression models showed that incorporating sampling, scavenging, and search efficiency adjustments improved model fit. Estimating total avian mortality is only a first step in developing an assessment of the biological significance of mortality at communication towers for individual species or groups of species. Nevertheless, our estimate can be used to evaluate this source of mortality, develop subsequent per-species mortality estimates, and motivate policy action.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22558082; PMCID:PMC3338802 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 475
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Author Wahl, F.; Kantermann, T.; Amft, O.
Title How much Light do you get? Estimating Daily Light Exposure using Smartphones Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers Abbreviated Journal (up) Proc. of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages 43-46
Keywords Instrumentation; light exposure; context inference, light intensity; light intake; circadian clock; circadian rhythm; mobile sensing
Abstract We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human’s circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle, we developed a smartphone-based system that does not re- quire additional sensors for illuminance estimation. To evaluate our approach, we conducted a free-living study with 12 users, each carrying a smartphone, a head-mounted light reference sensor, and a wrist-worn light sensing device for six consecutive days. Estimated light values were compared to the head-mounted reference, the wrist-worn device and a mean value estimate. Our results show that illuminance could be estimated at less than 20% error for all study participants, outperforming the wrist-worn device. In 9 out of 12 participants the estimation deviated less than 10% from the reference measurements.
Address ACTLab, Chair of Sensor Technology, University of Passau (florian.wahl@uni-passau.de)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ACM Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1206
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Author Strutt, R.J.
Title A photoelectric method of measuring the light of the night sky with studies of the course of variation through the night Type Journal Article
Year 1929 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Containing Papers of a Mathematical and Physical Character Abbreviated Journal (up) Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A
Volume 124 Issue 794 Pages 395-408
Keywords Instrumentation; Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract The investigations already published on the intensity of the night sky have been made by means of visual photometry, using a convenient instrument with a self-contained luminous source of radioactive origin. Nothing could rival this for simplicity and portability; it is always ready and requires no attention. On the other hand visual photometry is not a very satisfactory process even for ordinary light, and with this faint light it is far from giving the desirable degree of accuracy. I have therefore spent much effort in trying to replace it by some photoelectric method of measurement. A satisfactory method has now been evolved, and will be described, together with the results. A preliminary notice of the earlier results was given in a paper written at the request of Prof. S. Chapman, F. R. S., Chairman of the International Committee on Terrestrial and Solar Relationships, the receipt of which was acknowledged by him on June 19, 1928. The relevant passage is:- “Most of the difficulties have been overcome and preliminary observations have been in progress for some months past. I have been able to follow the changes of intensity from hour to hour on clear nights. Some evidence has been found suggesting diurnal periodicity. The observed intensity nearly always increases between nightfall and midnight, beyond which the observations have not usually been carried.”
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-1207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3124
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Author Allik, T.; Ramboyong, L.; Roberts, M.; Walters, M.; Soyka, T.; Dixon, R.; Cho, J.
Title Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proc. SPIE 9827, Ocean Sensing and Monitoring VIII, 98270B (May 17, 2016) Abbreviated Journal (up) Proc. SPIE 9827
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; Sensors; Cameras; Long wavelength infrared; Short wave infrared radiation; Spectroscopy; Calibration; Remote sensing; Water; Near infrared; Night vision
Abstract Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.
Address Active EO Inc.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1475
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