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Author Li, X.; Levin, N.; Xie, J.; Li, D.
Title Monitoring hourly night-time light by an unmanned aerial vehicle and its implications to satellite remote sensing Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 247 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow; Instrumentation
Abstract (up) Satellite-observed night-time light in urban areas has been widely used as an indicator for socioeconomic development and light pollution. Up to present, the diurnal dynamics of city light during the night, which are important to understand the nature of human activity and the underlying variables explaining night-time brightness, have hardly been investigated by remote sensing techniques due to limitation of the revisit time and spatial resolution of available satellites. In this study, we employed a consumer-grade unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to monitor city light in a study area located in Wuhan City, China, from 8:08 PM, April 15, 2019 to 5:08 AM, April 16, 2019, with an hourly temporal resolution. By using three ground-based Sky Quality Meters (SQMs), we found that the UAV-recorded light brightness was consistent with the ground luminous intensity measured by the SQMs in both the spatial (R2 = 0.72) and temporal dimensions (R2 > 0.94), and that the average city light brightness was consistent with the sky brightness in the temporal dimension (R2 = 0.98), indicating that UAV images can reliably monitor the city's night-time brightness. The temporal analysis showed that different locations had different patterns of temporal changes in their night-time brightness, implying that inter-calibration of two kinds of satellite images with different overpass times would be a challenge. Combining an urban function map of 18 classes and the hourly UAV images, we found that urban functions differed in their temporal light dynamics. For example, the outdoor sports field lost 97.28% of its measured brightness between 8: 08 PM – 4:05 AM, while an administrative building only lost 4.56%, and the entire study area lost 61.86% of its total brightness. Within our study area, the period between 9:06 PM and 10:05 PM was the period with largest amount of light loss. The spectral analysis we conducted showed that city light colors were different in some urban functions, with the major road being the reddest region at 8:08 PM and becoming even redder at 4:05 AM. This preliminary study indicates that UAVs are a good tool to investigate city light at night, and that city light is very complex in both of the temporal and spatial dimensions, requiring comprehensive investigation using more advanced UAV techniques, and emphasizing the need for geostationary platforms for night-time light sensors.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3014
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Author Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Aubé, M.; Zamorano, J.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Colour remote sensing of the impact of artificial light at night (I): The potential of the International Space Station and other DSLR-based platforms Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 224 Issue Pages 92-103
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract (up) Sensors on remote sensing satellites have provided useful tools for evaluation of the environmental impacts of nighttime artificial light pollution. However, due to their panchromatic nature, the data available from these sensors (VIIRS/DNB and DMSP/OLS) has a limited capacity accurately to assess this impact. Moreover, in some cases, recorded variations can be misleading. Until new satellite platforms and sensors are available, only nighttime images taken with DSLR cameras from the International Space Station (ISS), airplanes, balloons or other such platforms can provide the required information. Here we describe a theoretical approach using colour-colour diagrams to analyse images taken by astronauts on the ISS to estimate spatial and temporal variation in the spectrum of artificial lighting emissions. We then evaluate how this information can be used to determine effects on some key environmental indices: photopic vision, the Melatonin Suppression Index, the Star Light Index, the Induced Photosynthesis Index, production of NO2-NO radicals, energy efficiency and CO2 emissions, and Correlated Colour Temperature. Finally, we use the city of Milan as a worked example of the approach.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2189
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Author Bará, S.; Rigueiro, I.; Lima, R.C.
Title Monitoring transition: Expected night sky brightness trends in different photometric bands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 239 Issue Pages 106644
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract (up) Several light pollution indicators are commonly used to monitor the effects of the transition from outdoor lighting systems based on traditional gas-discharge lamps to solid-state light sources. In this work we analyze a subset of these indicators, including the artificial zenithal night sky brightness in the visual photopic and scotopic bands, the brightness in the specific photometric band of the widely used Sky Quality Meter (SQM), and the top-of-atmosphere radiance detected by the VIIRS-DNB radiometer onboard the satellite Suomi-NPP. Using a single-scattering approximation in a layered atmosphere we quantitatively show that, depending on the transition scenarios, these indicators may show different, even opposite behaviors. This is mainly due to the combined effects of the changes in the sources' spectra and angular radiation patterns, the wavelength-dependent atmospheric propagation processes and the differences in the detector spectral sensitivity bands. It is suggested that the possible presence of this differential behavior should be taken into account when evaluating light pollution indicator datasets for assessing the outcomes of public policy decisions regarding the upgrading of outdoor lighting systems.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2810
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Author Barentine, J.C.
Title Methods for Assessment and Monitoring of Light Pollution around Ecologically Sensitive Sites Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 54
Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Review
Abstract (up) Since the introduction of electric lighting over a century ago, and particularly in the decades following the Second World War, indications of artificial light on the nighttime Earth as seen from Earth orbit have increased at a rate exceeding that of world population growth during the same period. Modification of the natural photic environment at night is a clear and imminent consequence of the proliferation of anthropogenic light at night into outdoor spaces, and with this unprecedented change comes a host of known and suspected ecological consequences. In the past two decades, the conservation community has gradually come to view light pollution as a threat requiring the development of best management practices. Establishing those practices demands a means of quantifying the problem, identifying polluting sources, and monitoring the evolution of their impacts through time. The proliferation of solid-state lighting and the changes to source spectral power distribution it has brought relative to legacy lighting technologies add the complication of color to the overall situation. In this paper, I describe the challenge of quantifying light pollution threats to ecologically-sensitive sites in the context of efforts to conserve natural nighttime darkness, assess the current state of the art in detection and imaging technology as applied to this realm, review some recent innovations, and consider future prospects for imaging approaches to provide substantial support for darkness conservation initiatives around the world.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2498
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Author Cinzano, P.
Title Night Sky Photometry with Sky Quality Meter Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Technical Report 9, ISTIL. V1.4. Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; light pollution; night sky brightness; photometry; instruments; calibration
Abstract (up) Sky Quality Meter, a low cost and pocket size night sky brightness photometer, opens to the general public the possibility to quantify the quality of the night sky. Expecting a large diffusion of measurements taken with this instrument, I tested and characterized it. I analyzed with synthetic photometry and laboratory measurements the relationship between the SQM photometrical system and the main systems used in light pollution studies. I evaluated the conversion factors to Johnson’s B and V bands, CIE photopic and CIE scotopic responses for typical spectra and the spectral mismatch correction factors when specific filters are added.
Address Dipartimento di Astronomia, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 2, I-35100 Padova, Italy; cinzano(at)lplab.it
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ISTIL Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 473
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