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Author (up) Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville, A.M. 2nd; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An estimate of avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages e34025  
  Keywords Ecology; Accidents/*statistics & numerical data; Altitude; Animals; Birds/*injuries; Canada; Computer Communication Networks/*instrumentation; Conservation of Natural Resources/*statistics & numerical data; *Flight, Animal; *Mortality; Regression Analysis; United States  
  Abstract Avian mortality at communication towers in the continental United States and Canada is an issue of pressing conservation concern. Previous estimates of this mortality have been based on limited data and have not included Canada. We compiled a database of communication towers in the continental United States and Canada and estimated avian mortality by tower with a regression relating avian mortality to tower height. This equation was derived from 38 tower studies for which mortality data were available and corrected for sampling effort, search efficiency, and scavenging where appropriate. Although most studies document mortality at guyed towers with steady-burning lights, we accounted for lower mortality at towers without guy wires or steady-burning lights by adjusting estimates based on published studies. The resulting estimate of mortality at towers is 6.8 million birds per year in the United States and Canada. Bootstrapped subsampling indicated that the regression was robust to the choice of studies included and a comparison of multiple regression models showed that incorporating sampling, scavenging, and search efficiency adjustments improved model fit. Estimating total avian mortality is only a first step in developing an assessment of the biological significance of mortality at communication towers for individual species or groups of species. Nevertheless, our estimate can be used to evaluate this source of mortality, develop subsequent per-species mortality estimates, and motivate policy action.  
  Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. longcore@urbanwildlands.org  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22558082; PMCID:PMC3338802 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 475  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ma, S.; Yan, W.; Huang, Y.-X.; Ai, W.-H.; Zhao, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Vicarious calibration of S-NPP/VIIRS day-night band using deep convective clouds Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 42-55  
  Keywords Instrumentation, Remote Sensing  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1077  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Müller, A.; Wuchterl, G.; Sarazin, M. url  openurl
  Title Measuring the Night Sky Brightness with the Lightmeter. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication ReVMexAA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 46–49  
  Keywords Instrumentation; instrumentation: photometers; light pollution; methods: data analysis; methods: observational; site testing  
  Abstract We present a newly developed, low-cost photometer for long-term monitoring of the night sky brightness and

light pollution on Earth. The so-called Lightmeter is an as far as possible stand-alone operational, fully

weatherproof, and maintenance-free device. It provides a high data sampling rate of up to 1 Hz as well as a

superb sensitivity covering the whole brightness range down to the darkest night time conditions. The excellent

performance of the Lightmeter allows a continuously monitoring of the night sky brightness and opens a wide

range of applications at an observatory site like determining overall sky conditions in real time, cloud detection

and estimation of their velocity, measuring relative changes in extinction as well as the detection of long term

trends in brightness caused by an increase of artificial illumination. We will present first results of measurements

taken at Cerro Armazones, one of the best obser
 
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 471  
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Author (up) Meier; J.M. openurl 
  Title Temporal Profiles of Urban Lighting: Proposal for a research design and first results from three sites in Berlin Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 11-28  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Lighting; Society  
  Abstract This paper presents and experimentally applies a research design for studying the temporal dimension of outdoor artificial illumination in complex lightscapes such as those of urban centres. It contributes to filling the gap between analyses of high-resolution aerial imagery, which provide detailed but static information on the spatial composition of lightscapes, and existing methods for studying their dynamics, which measure changes at high levels of aggregation. The research design adopts a small-scale, detailed approach by using close-range time-lapse videos to document the on/off patterns of individual light sources as the night progresses. It provides a framework and vocabulary for discrete and comparative analyses of the identified temporal profiles of lighting. This allows for pinpointing similarities and differences among the dynamics of different places, nights or categories of lighting. Its application to three case studies in Berlin indicate that switch-on and switch-off times are clustered, resulting in static and dynamic phases of the night. Midnight is a temporal fault-line, after which full illumination ends as portions of the illumination are extinguished. Switch-off times and -rates differ among the three lightscapes and, especially, among four functional types of lighting that were differentiated: infrastructural and commercial units largely remain on all night, while substantial portions of architectural and indoor lighting are switched off, though at fairly different times. Such findings are valuable for studies based on data collected at specific points in time (aerial imagery, measurements), for informing and monitoring temporally oriented lighting policies, and for understanding urban dynamics at large.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1901  
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Author (up) Miller, S.; Straka, W.; Mills, S.; Elvidge, C.; Lee, T.; Solbrig, J.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A.; Weiss, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating the Capabilities of the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 5 Issue 12 Pages 6717-6766  
  Keywords Instrumentation; satellite imagery; nighttime visible/near-infrared; moonlight  
  Abstract Daytime measurements of reflected sunlight in the visible spectrum have been a staple of Earth-viewing radiometers since the advent of the environmental satellite platform. At night, these same optical-spectrum sensors have traditionally been limited to thermal infrared emission, which contains relatively poor information content for many important weather and climate parameters. These deficiencies have limited our ability to characterize the full diurnal behavior and processes of parameters relevant to improved monitoring, understanding and modeling of weather and climate processes. Visible-spectrum light information does exist during the nighttime hours, originating from a wide variety of sources, but its detection requires specialized technology. Such measurements have existed, in a limited way, on USA Department of Defense satellites, but the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, which carries a new Day/Night Band (DNB) radiometer, offers the first quantitative measurements of nocturnal visible and near-infrared light. Here, we demonstrate the expanded potential for nocturnal low-light visible applications enabled by the DNB. Via a combination of terrestrial and extraterrestrial light sources, such observations are always available—expanding many current existing applications while enabling entirely new capabilities. These novel low-light measurements open doors to a wealth of new interdisciplinary research topics while lighting a pathway toward the optimized design of follow-on satellite based low light visible sensors.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 468  
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