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Author (up) Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature of the diffuse light near cities detected in nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue Pages 7829
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Diffuse glow has been observed around brightly lit cities in nighttime satellite imagery since at least the first publication of large scale maps in the late 1990s. In the literature, this has often been assumed to be an error related to the sensor, and referred to as “blooming”, presumably in relation to the effect that can occur when using a CCD to photograph a bright light source. Here we show that the effect seen on the DMSP/OLS, SNPP/VIIRS-DNB and ISS is not only instrumental, but in fact represents a real detection of light scattered by the atmosphere. Data from the Universidad Complutense Madrid sky brightness survey are compared to nighttime imagery from multiple sensors with differing spatial resolutions, and found to be strongly correlated. These results suggest that it should be possible for a future space-based imaging radiometer to monitor changes in the diffuse artificial skyglow of cities.
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2909
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Author (up) Schnitt, S.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Temperature stability of the sky quality meter Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 12166-12174
Keywords *Artifacts; Atmosphere/*analysis; Environmental Monitoring/*instrumentation; Equipment Design; Equipment Failure Analysis; Photometry/*instrumentation; Reproducibility of Results; Sensitivity and Specificity; Temperature; *Transducers; Sky Quality Meter; SQM
Abstract The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM)was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of -15 degrees C to 35 degrees C, and during temperature changes of -33 degrees C/h and +70 degrees C/h.This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%,indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions.
Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6-10, Berlin 12165, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24030682; PMCID:PMC3821345 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 194
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Author (up) Schwarting, T., McIntire, J., Oudrari, H., & Xiong, X
Title JPSS-1/NOAA-20 VIIRS Day-Night Band Prelaunch Radiometric Calibration and Performance Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-13
Keywords Instrumentation
Abstract The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the first Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System series 1 (JPSS-1) has a panchromatic, three gain stage, day-night band (DNB) capable of imaging the Earth under illumination conditions ranging from reflected moonlight to daytime scenes. The DNB has four charged-coupled devices (CCDs) with 32 different modes of time-delay integration and subpixel aggregation to achieve high SNR in low light conditions while maintaining roughly constant spatial resolution across scan. During the prelaunch testing phase, these 32 different aggregation modes are separately calibrated over a large dynamic range (covering seven orders of magnitude) through a series of radiometric tests designed to generate initial calibration coefficients for the sensor data record (SDR) operational algorithm, assess radiometric performance, and determine compliance with the sensor design requirements. Early in the environmental testing at the Raytheon El Segundo facility, nonlinear behavior was discovered in some DNB edge of scan aggregation modes at low signal levels. In response to this nonlinearity, the test program was altered to characterize the radiometric performance both in the baseline configuration and with a modified aggregation scheme that eliminates the modes used at the end of scan, replacing them with an unaffected adjacent mode and trading off spatial resolution for improved linearity. Presented in this paper is the radiometric performance under both sensor configurations including dynamic range, sensitivity, radiometric uncertainty, and nonlinearity along with a discussion of the potential impact to DNB on-orbit calibration and SDR performance.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2541
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Author (up) Spur, M.; Houel, N.; Tourre, V.
Title Visualizing Multilayered Geospatial Data In Virtual Reality To Assess Public Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.
Volume Xliii-B4-2020 Issue Pages 623-630
Keywords Lighting; Instrumentation; Vision
Abstract With the improvement and proliferation of virtual reality devices, their use for research and professional activity is broadening,fostering the advent of the field of immersive analytics, as is their acceptance among consumers. Other than the heightened sense of immersion into visualized data they provide, they also make displays of much larger apparent size and different positioning practical than what would be possible otherwise. Drawing on these benefits, we implemented a development of Multiple and Coordinated Displays (MCVs) for geovisualization that stacks different layers of data above each other, tilted for legibility. In a formal experiment, we evaluated it and two other, comparable MCV methods implemented in VR for their usefulness in analyzing public perception and soliciting public feedback regarding urban street lighting. In that field, the direction has recently been shifting from purely systemic development to a participatory approach, thus our investigation was into how a system like this could facilitate participation that can yield actionable results. Previous analysis of interaction data and usability questionnaires reveals preferences for certain systems depending on user characteristics, with the stack system showing a slight advantage over a grid of layers and especially over temporal multiplexing. We show that regardless of MCV variation, participants were able to analyze and provide feedback on public lighting situations that can directly contribute to urbanist work. The MCV approach further aided in understanding their choices, as eye-tracking allowed us to analyze attention to individual data layers.
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ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3105
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Author (up) Stone, J.E.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Ftouni, S.; Magee, M.; Howard, M.; Lockley, S.W.; Sletten, T.L.; Anderson, C.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Postnova, S.
Title Generalizability of A Neural Network Model for Circadian Phase Prediction in Real-World Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11001
Keywords Human Health; Instrumentation
Abstract A neural network model was previously developed to predict melatonin rhythms accurately from blue light and skin temperature recordings in individuals on a fixed sleep schedule. This study aimed to test the generalizability of the model to other sleep schedules, including rotating shift work. Ambulatory wrist blue light irradiance and skin temperature data were collected in 16 healthy individuals on fixed and habitual sleep schedules, and 28 rotating shift workers. Artificial neural network models were trained to predict the circadian rhythm of (i) salivary melatonin on a fixed sleep schedule; (ii) urinary aMT6s on both fixed and habitual sleep schedules, including shift workers on a diurnal schedule; and (iii) urinary aMT6s in rotating shift workers on a night shift schedule. To determine predicted circadian phase, center of gravity of the fitted bimodal skewed baseline cosine curve was used for melatonin, and acrophase of the cosine curve for aMT6s. On a fixed sleep schedule, the model predicted melatonin phase to within +/- 1 hour in 67% and +/- 1.5 hours in 100% of participants, with mean absolute error of 41 +/- 32 minutes. On diurnal schedules, including shift workers, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 66% and +/- 2 hours in 87% of participants, with mean absolute error of 63 +/- 67 minutes. On night shift schedules, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 42% and +/- 2 hours in 53% of participants, with mean absolute error of 143 +/- 155 minutes. Prediction accuracy was similar when using either 1 (wrist) or 11 skin temperature sensor inputs. These findings demonstrate that the model can predict circadian timing to within +/- 2 hours for the vast majority of individuals on diurnal schedules, using blue light and a single temperature sensor. However, this approach did not generalize to night shift conditions.
Address School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31358781; PMCID:PMC6662750 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2667
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