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Author Qiu, S.; Shao, X.; Cao, C.; Uprety, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Feasibility demonstration for calibrating Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite day/night band using Dome C and Greenland under moon light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Remote Sens  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 016024  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract The day/night band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities. DNB covers almost seven orders of magnitude in its dynamic range from full sunlight to half-moon. To achieve this large dynamic range, it uses four charge-coupled device arrays in three gain stages. The low gain stage (LGS) gain is calibrated using the solar diffuser. In operations, the medium and high gain stage values are determined by multiplying the gain ratios between the medium gain stage, and LGS, and high gain stage (HGS) and LGS, respectively. This paper focuses on independently verifying the radiometric accuracy and stability of DNB HGS using DNB observations of ground vicarious calibration sites under lunar illumination at night. Dome C in Antarctica in the southern hemisphere and Greenland in the northern hemisphere are chosen as the vicarious calibration sites. Nadir observations of these high latitude regions by VIIRS are selected during perpetual night season, i.e., from April to August for Dome C and from November to January for Greenland over the years 2012 to 2013. Additional selection criteria, such as lunar phase being more than half-moon and no influence of straylight effects, are also applied in data selection. The lunar spectral irradiance model, as a function of Sun–Earth–Moon distances and lunar phase, is used to determine the top-of-atmosphere reflectance at the vicarious site. The vicariously derived long-term reflectance from DNB observations agrees with the reflectance derived from Hyperion observations. The vicarious trending of DNB radiometric performance using DOME-C and Greenland under moon light shows that the DNB HGS radiometric variability (relative accuracy to lunar irradiance model and Hyperion observation) is within 8%. Residual variability is also discussed.  
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  ISSN (up) 1931-3195 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1372  
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Author Chen, H.; Xiong, X.; Geng, X.; Twedt, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Stray-light correction and prediction for Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership visible infrared imaging radiometer suite day-night band Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Rem. Sens.  
  Volume 13 Issue 02 Pages 1  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership visible infrared imaging radiometer suite instrument has successfully operated since its launch in October 2011. Stray-light contamination is much larger than prelaunch expectations, and it causes a major decrease in quality of the day-night band night imagery when the spacecraft is crossing the Northern or Southern day-night terminators. The stray light can be operationally estimated using Earth-view data that are measured over dark surfaces during the new moon each month. More than 7 years of nighttime images have demonstrated that the stray-light contamination mainly depends on the Earth–Sun–spacecraft geometry, so its intensity is generally estimated as a function of the satellite zenith angle. In practice, stray-light contamination is also detector- and scan-angle-dependent. Previous methods of stray-light prediction generally rely on using the known stray light level from the same month in the previous year, when the Earth–Sun–spacecraft geometries had been similar. We propose a new method to predict stray-light contamination. The Kullback–Leibler similarity metric is used as a method to combine data from multiple years with appropriate adjustments for degradation and geometry drifts in order to calculate a fused stray-light contamination correction. The new method provides an improved prediction of stray-light contamination compared to the existing methods and may be considered for future use in the real-time NASA Level-1B products.  
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  ISSN (up) 1931-3195 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2517  
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville, A.M. 2nd; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An estimate of avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages e34025  
  Keywords Ecology; Accidents/*statistics & numerical data; Altitude; Animals; Birds/*injuries; Canada; Computer Communication Networks/*instrumentation; Conservation of Natural Resources/*statistics & numerical data; *Flight, Animal; *Mortality; Regression Analysis; United States  
  Abstract Avian mortality at communication towers in the continental United States and Canada is an issue of pressing conservation concern. Previous estimates of this mortality have been based on limited data and have not included Canada. We compiled a database of communication towers in the continental United States and Canada and estimated avian mortality by tower with a regression relating avian mortality to tower height. This equation was derived from 38 tower studies for which mortality data were available and corrected for sampling effort, search efficiency, and scavenging where appropriate. Although most studies document mortality at guyed towers with steady-burning lights, we accounted for lower mortality at towers without guy wires or steady-burning lights by adjusting estimates based on published studies. The resulting estimate of mortality at towers is 6.8 million birds per year in the United States and Canada. Bootstrapped subsampling indicated that the regression was robust to the choice of studies included and a comparison of multiple regression models showed that incorporating sampling, scavenging, and search efficiency adjustments improved model fit. Estimating total avian mortality is only a first step in developing an assessment of the biological significance of mortality at communication towers for individual species or groups of species. Nevertheless, our estimate can be used to evaluate this source of mortality, develop subsequent per-species mortality estimates, and motivate policy action.  
  Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. longcore@urbanwildlands.org  
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  ISSN (up) 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22558082; PMCID:PMC3338802 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 475  
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Author Tamir, R.; Lerner, A.; Haspel, C.; Dubinsky, Z.; Iluz, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spectral and spatial distribution of light pollution in the waters of the northern Gulf of Aqaba (Eilat) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 42329  
  Keywords Measurement; Instrumentation; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The urbanization of the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba has exposed the marine environment there, including unique fringing coral reefs, to strong anthropogenic light sources. Here we present the first in situ measurements of artificial nighttime light under water in such an ecosystem, with irradiance measured in 12 wavelength bands, at 19 measurement stations spread over 44 square km, and at 30 depths down to 30-m depth. At 1-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) 500 m from the city to 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the center of the gulf (9.5 km from the city) in the yellow channel (589-nm wavelength) and from 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.3 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel (443-nm wavelength). Down to 10-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the yellow channel and from 2.6 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) to 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel, and we even detected a signal at 30-m depth. This irradiance could influence such biological processes as the tuning of circadian clocks, the synchronization of coral spawning, recruitment and competition, vertical migration of demersal plankton, feeding patterns, and prey/predator visual interactions.  
  Address School of Agriculture and Environmental Studies, Beit Berl College, Kfar Saba, Israel  
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  ISSN (up) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28186138; PMCID:PMC5301253 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1861  
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Author Stone, J.E.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Ftouni, S.; Magee, M.; Howard, M.; Lockley, S.W.; Sletten, T.L.; Anderson, C.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Postnova, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Generalizability of A Neural Network Model for Circadian Phase Prediction in Real-World Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11001  
  Keywords Human Health; Instrumentation  
  Abstract A neural network model was previously developed to predict melatonin rhythms accurately from blue light and skin temperature recordings in individuals on a fixed sleep schedule. This study aimed to test the generalizability of the model to other sleep schedules, including rotating shift work. Ambulatory wrist blue light irradiance and skin temperature data were collected in 16 healthy individuals on fixed and habitual sleep schedules, and 28 rotating shift workers. Artificial neural network models were trained to predict the circadian rhythm of (i) salivary melatonin on a fixed sleep schedule; (ii) urinary aMT6s on both fixed and habitual sleep schedules, including shift workers on a diurnal schedule; and (iii) urinary aMT6s in rotating shift workers on a night shift schedule. To determine predicted circadian phase, center of gravity of the fitted bimodal skewed baseline cosine curve was used for melatonin, and acrophase of the cosine curve for aMT6s. On a fixed sleep schedule, the model predicted melatonin phase to within +/- 1 hour in 67% and +/- 1.5 hours in 100% of participants, with mean absolute error of 41 +/- 32 minutes. On diurnal schedules, including shift workers, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 66% and +/- 2 hours in 87% of participants, with mean absolute error of 63 +/- 67 minutes. On night shift schedules, the model predicted aMT6s acrophase to within +/- 1 hour in 42% and +/- 2 hours in 53% of participants, with mean absolute error of 143 +/- 155 minutes. Prediction accuracy was similar when using either 1 (wrist) or 11 skin temperature sensor inputs. These findings demonstrate that the model can predict circadian timing to within +/- 2 hours for the vast majority of individuals on diurnal schedules, using blue light and a single temperature sensor. However, this approach did not generalize to night shift conditions.  
  Address School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31358781; PMCID:PMC6662750 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2667  
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