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Author Levin, N.; Phinn, S.
Title Illuminating the capabilities of Landsat 8 for mapping night lights Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 182 Issue Pages 27-38
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Remote sensing of night-lights has been enhanced in recent years with the availability of the new VIIRS Day and Night band, the commercial EROS-B satellite and astronaut photographs from the International Space Station. However, dedicated space-borne multispectral sensors offering radiance calibrated night lights imagery are yet to be launched. Here we examined the capabilities of Landsat 8 to acquire night time light images of the Earth. Examining seven night-time Landsat 8 scenes, we found that brightly lit areas in both urban (Berlin, Las Vegas, Nagoya and Tel-Aviv) and gas flares (Basra, Kuwait) areas were detected in all eight bands of Landsat 8. The threshold for detection of lit areas was approximately 0.4 W/m2/μm/sr in bands 1–5 and 8 of Landsat 8. This threshold level was higher than Landsat dark noise levels, and slightly lower than post launch Landsat 8 OLI band dependent noise equivalent radiance difference levels. Drawing on this, we call on the USGS to plan an annual night-time acquisition of urban and gas flares areas globally, and to enable the performance of the future Landsat 10 to be established in a way that it will be sensitive enough to image the Earth at night, thus performing as Nightsat during the night.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1452
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Author Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R.M.; Pennington, W.F.; Flittner, D.E.; Al-Saadi, J.A.; Hilton, B.B.; Nicks, D.K.; Newchurch, M.J.; Carr, J.L.; Janz, S.J.; Andraschko, M.R.; Arola, A.; Baker, B.D.; Canova, B.P.; Chan Miller, C.; Cohen, R.C.; Davis, J.E.; Dussault, M.E.; Edwards, D.P.; Fishman, J.; Ghulam, A.; González Abad, G.; Grutter, M.; Herman, J.R.; Houck, J.; Jacob, D.J.; Joiner, J.; Kerridge, B.J.; Kim, J.; Krotkov, N.A.; Lamsal, L.; Li, C.; Lindfors, A.; Martin, R.V.; McElroy, C.T.; McLinden, C.; Natraj, V.; Neil, D.O.; Nowlan, C.R.; OSullivan, E.J.; Palmer, P.I.; Pierce, R.B.; Pippin, M.R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Spurr, R.J.D.; Szykman, J.J.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, J.P.; Veihelmann, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Chance, K.
Title Tropospheric emissions: Monitoring of pollution (TEMPO) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 186 Issue Pages 17-39
Keywords Instrumentation, Remote Sensing
Abstract
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1498
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Author Alamús, R.; Bará, S.; Corbera, J.; Escofet, J.; Palà , V.; Pipia, L.; Tardà, A.
Title Ground-based hyperspectral analysis of the urban nightscape Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Volume 124 Issue Pages 16-26
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract Airborne hyperspectral cameras provide the basic information to estimate the energy wasted skywards by outdoor lighting systems, as well as to locate and identify their sources. However, a complete characterization of the urban light pollution levels also requires evaluating these effects from the city dwellers standpoint, e.g. the energy waste associated to the excessive illuminance on walls and pavements, light trespass, or the luminance distributions causing potential glare, to mention but a few. On the other hand, the spectral irradiance at the entrance of the human eye is the primary input to evaluate the possible health effects associated with the exposure to artificial light at night, according to the more recent models available in the literature. In this work we demonstrate the possibility of using a hyperspectral imager (routinely used in airborne campaigns) to measure the ground-level spectral radiance of the urban nightscape and to retrieve several magnitudes of interest for light pollution studies. We also present the preliminary results from a field campaign carried out in the downtown of Barcelona.
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Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1613
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Author Voigt, L.P.; Reynolds, K.; Mehryar, M.; Chan, W.S.; Kostelecky, N.; Pastores, S.M.; Halpern, N.A.
Title Monitoring sound and light continuously in an intensive care unit patient room: A pilot study Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Journal of Critical Care
Volume 38 Issue 21 Pages 5952-5961
Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health
Abstract Purpose

To determine the feasibility of continuous recording of sound and light in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Materials and Methods

Four one-hour baseline scenarios in an empty ICU patient room by day and night (doors open or closed and maximal or minimal lighting) and two daytime scenarios simulating a stable and unstable patient (quiet or loud devices and staff) were conducted. Sound and light levels were continuously recorded using a commercially available multisensor monitor and transmitted via the hospital's network to a cloud-based data storage and management system.

Results

The empty ICU room was loud with similar mean sound levels for the day and night simulations of 45–46 dBA. Mean levels for maximal lighting during day and night ranged from 1306–1812 lux and mean levels for minimum lighting were 1–3 lux. The mean sound levels for the stable and unstable patient simulations were 61 and 81 dBA, respectively. The mean light levels were 349 lux for the stable patient and 1947 lux for the unstable patient.

Conclusions

Combined sound and light can be continuously and easily monitored in the ICU setting. Incorporating sound and light monitors in ICU rooms may promote an enhanced patient and staff centered healing environment.
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ISSN 0883-9441 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1614
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Author Nicole Wonderlin, L. M. Ross, Peter White
Title Construction and performance of a novel capturemark-release moth trap Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Great Lakes Entomologist Abbreviated Journal
Volume 50 Issue in press Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Instrumentation
Abstract Mark-recapture studies can provide important information about moth movement as well as habitat preference across a landscape, but to date, such studies tend to be species-specific or require labor-intensive methodologies. To address this challenge, we designed a capture-mark-release-trap (CMRT) featuring a cooling unit attached to a black light trap. The CMRT captures and incapacitates moths throughout the night until the morning, when they can be marked on-site and released. Moths captured with the CMRT during summer of 2016 had a recapture rate of 1.6%, similar to those of previous studies. Importantly, because moths are immobilized by the CMRT, they can be handled and marked with ease, reducing the opportunities to damage specimens prior to release. The CMRT can capture a wide array of moth species and may facilitate an increase in the monitoring of moth movement across landscapes.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1756
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