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Author Zou, C.-Z.; Zhou, L.; Lin, L.; Sun, N.; Chen, Y.; Flynn, L.E.; Zhang, B.; Cao, C.; Iturbide-Sanchez, F.; Beck, T.; Yan, B.; Kalluri, S.; Bai, Y.; Blonski, S.; Choi, T.; Divakarla, M.; Gu, Y.; Hao, X.; Li, W.; Liang, D.; Niu, J.; Shao, X.; Strow, L.; Tobin, D.C.; Tremblay, D.; Uprety, S.; Wang, W.; Xu, H.; Yang, H.; Goldberg, M.D.
Title The Reprocessed Suomi NPP Satellite Observations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 18 Pages 2891
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract The launch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and its follow-on NOAA Joint Polar Satellite Systems (JPSS) satellites marks the beginning of a new era of operational satellite observations of the Earth and atmosphere for environmental applications with high spatial resolution and sampling rate. The S-NPP and JPSS are equipped with five instruments, each with advanced design in Earth sampling, including the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES). Among them, the ATMS is the new generation of microwave sounder measuring temperature profiles from the surface to the upper stratosphere and moisture profiles from the surface to the upper troposphere, while CrIS is the first of a series of advanced operational hyperspectral sounders providing more accurate atmospheric and moisture sounding observations with higher vertical resolution for weather and climate applications. The OMPS instrument measures solar backscattered ultraviolet to provide information on the concentrations of ozone in the Earth’s atmosphere, and VIIRS provides global observations of a variety of essential environmental variables over the land, atmosphere, cryosphere, and ocean with visible and infrared imagery. The CERES instrument measures the solar energy reflected by the Earth, the longwave radiative emission from the Earth, and the role of cloud processes in the Earth’s energy balance. Presently, observations from several instruments on S-NPP and JPSS-1 (re-named NOAA-20 after launch) provide near real-time monitoring of the environmental changes and improve weather forecasting by assimilation into numerical weather prediction models. Envisioning the need for consistencies in satellite retrievals, improving climate reanalyses, development of climate data records, and improving numerical weather forecasting, the NOAA/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) has been reprocessing the S-NPP observations for ATMS, CrIS, OMPS, and VIIRS through their life cycle. This article provides a summary of the instrument observing principles, data characteristics, reprocessing approaches, calibration algorithms, and validation results of the reprocessed sensor data records. The reprocessing generated consistent Level-1 sensor data records using unified and consistent calibration algorithms for each instrument that removed artificial jumps in data owing to operational changes, instrument anomalies, contaminations by anomaly views of the environment or spacecraft, and other causes. The reprocessed sensor data records were compared with and validated against other observations for a consistency check whenever such data were available. The reprocessed data will be archived in the NOAA data center with the same format as the operational data and technical support for data requests. Such a reprocessing is expected to improve the efficiency of the use of the S-NPP and JPSS satellite data and the accuracy of the observed essential environmental variables through either consistent satellite retrievals or use of the reprocessed data in numerical data assimilations.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3200
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Author Nielsen, E.T.
Title Illumination at twilight Type Journal Article
Year 1963 Publication Okios Abbreviated Journal
Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 9-21
Keywords Animals; Instrumentation; Methods
Abstract Introduction Poikilotherms with a nocturnal or crepuscular period of activity are usually guided by changes in illumination. The releasing factor may be a certain low level of illumination, or it might be a certain rate of change of intensity or a combination of both. ASCHOFF (1960) has shown that also animals with an internal clock mechanism of activation have to have the “clock” reset by actual changes in illumination. To all students of such animals it is essential to measure light intensity and its changes especially during the twilight period.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3196
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Author Kolláth, Z.; Száz, D.; Kolláth, K.; Tong, K.P.
Title Light Pollution Monitoring and Sky Colours Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 6 Issue 10 Pages 104
Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation; light pollution; imaging radiometry; colorimetry
Abstract The measurement of night sky quality has become an important task in nature conservation. The primary device used for this task can be a calibrated digital camera. In addition, colour information can be derived from sky photography. In this paper, we provide a test on a concept to gather information about the possible sources of night sky brightness based on digital camera images. This method helps to understand changes in night sky quality due to natural and artificial changes in the environment. We demonstrate that a well-defined colour–colour diagram can differentiate between the different natural and artificial sources of night sky radiance. The colour information can be essential when interpreting long-term evolution of light pollution measurements.
Address Department of Physics, Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) BDPK, 9700 Szombathely, Hungary; zkollath( at ) gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3170
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Author Strutt, R.J.
Title A photoelectric method of measuring the light of the night sky with studies of the course of variation through the night Type Journal Article
Year 1929 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Containing Papers of a Mathematical and Physical Character Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A
Volume 124 Issue 794 Pages 395-408
Keywords Instrumentation; Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract The investigations already published on the intensity of the night sky have been made by means of visual photometry, using a convenient instrument with a self-contained luminous source of radioactive origin. Nothing could rival this for simplicity and portability; it is always ready and requires no attention. On the other hand visual photometry is not a very satisfactory process even for ordinary light, and with this faint light it is far from giving the desirable degree of accuracy. I have therefore spent much effort in trying to replace it by some photoelectric method of measurement. A satisfactory method has now been evolved, and will be described, together with the results. A preliminary notice of the earlier results was given in a paper written at the request of Prof. S. Chapman, F. R. S., Chairman of the International Committee on Terrestrial and Solar Relationships, the receipt of which was acknowledged by him on June 19, 1928. The relevant passage is:- “Most of the difficulties have been overcome and preliminary observations have been in progress for some months past. I have been able to follow the changes of intensity from hour to hour on clear nights. Some evidence has been found suggesting diurnal periodicity. The observed intensity nearly always increases between nightfall and midnight, beyond which the observations have not usually been carried.”
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-1207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3124
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Author Kolláth, Z.; Száz, D.; Tong, K.P.; Kolláth, K.
Title The Colour of the Night Sky Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 6 Issue 9 Pages 90
Keywords Skyglow; Natural light; Instrumentation
Abstract The measurement of night sky quality has become an important task in night sky conservation. Modern measurement techniques involve mainly a calibrated digital camera or a spectroradiometer. However, panchromatic devices are still prevalent to this day, even in the absence of determining the spectral information of the night sky. In the case of multispectral measurements, colour information is currently presented in multiple ways. One of the most frequently used metrics is correlated colour temperature (CCT), which is not without its limitation for the purpose of describing especially the colour of natural night sky. Moreover, visually displaying the colour of the night sky in a quantitatively meaningful way has not attracted sufficient attention in the community of astronomy and light pollution research—most photographs of the night sky are post-processed in a way for aesthetic attractiveness rather than accurate representation of the night sky. The spectrum of the natural night sky varies in a wide range depending on solar activity and atmospheric properties. The most noticeable variation in the visible range is the variation of the atomic emission lines, primarily the green oxygen and orange sodium emission. Based on the accepted models of night sky emission, we created a random spectral database which represents the possible range of night sky radiance distribution. We used this spectral database as a learning set, to create a colour transformation between different colour spaces. The spectral sensitivity of some digital cameras is also used to determine an optimal transformation matrix from camera defined coordinates to real colours. The theoretical predictions were extended with actual spectral measurements in order to test the models and check the local constituents of night sky radiance. Here, we present an extended modelling of night sky colour and recommendations of its consistent measurement, as well as methods of visualising the colour of night sky in a consistent way, namely using the false colour enhancement.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3120
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