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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville, A.M. 2nd; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D.
Title An estimate of avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume (down) 7 Issue 4 Pages e34025
Keywords Ecology; Accidents/*statistics & numerical data; Altitude; Animals; Birds/*injuries; Canada; Computer Communication Networks/*instrumentation; Conservation of Natural Resources/*statistics & numerical data; *Flight, Animal; *Mortality; Regression Analysis; United States
Abstract Avian mortality at communication towers in the continental United States and Canada is an issue of pressing conservation concern. Previous estimates of this mortality have been based on limited data and have not included Canada. We compiled a database of communication towers in the continental United States and Canada and estimated avian mortality by tower with a regression relating avian mortality to tower height. This equation was derived from 38 tower studies for which mortality data were available and corrected for sampling effort, search efficiency, and scavenging where appropriate. Although most studies document mortality at guyed towers with steady-burning lights, we accounted for lower mortality at towers without guy wires or steady-burning lights by adjusting estimates based on published studies. The resulting estimate of mortality at towers is 6.8 million birds per year in the United States and Canada. Bootstrapped subsampling indicated that the regression was robust to the choice of studies included and a comparison of multiple regression models showed that incorporating sampling, scavenging, and search efficiency adjustments improved model fit. Estimating total avian mortality is only a first step in developing an assessment of the biological significance of mortality at communication towers for individual species or groups of species. Nevertheless, our estimate can be used to evaluate this source of mortality, develop subsequent per-species mortality estimates, and motivate policy action.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22558082; PMCID:PMC3338802 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 475
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Author Blonski, S.; Cao, C.
Title Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Operational Calibration Reprocessing Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume (down) 7 Issue 12 Pages 16131-16149
Keywords Instrumentation
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1310
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Author Tamir, R.; Lerner, A.; Haspel, C.; Dubinsky, Z.; Iluz, D.
Title The spectral and spatial distribution of light pollution in the waters of the northern Gulf of Aqaba (Eilat) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume (down) 7 Issue Pages 42329
Keywords Measurement; Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract The urbanization of the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba has exposed the marine environment there, including unique fringing coral reefs, to strong anthropogenic light sources. Here we present the first in situ measurements of artificial nighttime light under water in such an ecosystem, with irradiance measured in 12 wavelength bands, at 19 measurement stations spread over 44 square km, and at 30 depths down to 30-m depth. At 1-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) 500 m from the city to 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the center of the gulf (9.5 km from the city) in the yellow channel (589-nm wavelength) and from 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.3 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel (443-nm wavelength). Down to 10-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the yellow channel and from 2.6 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) to 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel, and we even detected a signal at 30-m depth. This irradiance could influence such biological processes as the tuning of circadian clocks, the synchronization of coral spawning, recruitment and competition, vertical migration of demersal plankton, feeding patterns, and prey/predator visual interactions.
Address School of Agriculture and Environmental Studies, Beit Berl College, Kfar Saba, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28186138; PMCID:PMC5301253 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1861
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Author Kolláth, Z.; Száz, D.; Kolláth, K.; Tong, K.P.
Title Light Pollution Monitoring and Sky Colours Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume (down) 6 Issue 10 Pages 104
Keywords Skyglow; Instrumentation; light pollution; imaging radiometry; colorimetry
Abstract The measurement of night sky quality has become an important task in nature conservation. The primary device used for this task can be a calibrated digital camera. In addition, colour information can be derived from sky photography. In this paper, we provide a test on a concept to gather information about the possible sources of night sky brightness based on digital camera images. This method helps to understand changes in night sky quality due to natural and artificial changes in the environment. We demonstrate that a well-defined colour–colour diagram can differentiate between the different natural and artificial sources of night sky radiance. The colour information can be essential when interpreting long-term evolution of light pollution measurements.
Address Department of Physics, Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) BDPK, 9700 Szombathely, Hungary; zkollath( at ) gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3170
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Author Kolláth, Z.; Száz, D.; Tong, K.P.; Kolláth, K.
Title The Colour of the Night Sky Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume (down) 6 Issue 9 Pages 90
Keywords Skyglow; Natural light; Instrumentation
Abstract The measurement of night sky quality has become an important task in night sky conservation. Modern measurement techniques involve mainly a calibrated digital camera or a spectroradiometer. However, panchromatic devices are still prevalent to this day, even in the absence of determining the spectral information of the night sky. In the case of multispectral measurements, colour information is currently presented in multiple ways. One of the most frequently used metrics is correlated colour temperature (CCT), which is not without its limitation for the purpose of describing especially the colour of natural night sky. Moreover, visually displaying the colour of the night sky in a quantitatively meaningful way has not attracted sufficient attention in the community of astronomy and light pollution research—most photographs of the night sky are post-processed in a way for aesthetic attractiveness rather than accurate representation of the night sky. The spectrum of the natural night sky varies in a wide range depending on solar activity and atmospheric properties. The most noticeable variation in the visible range is the variation of the atomic emission lines, primarily the green oxygen and orange sodium emission. Based on the accepted models of night sky emission, we created a random spectral database which represents the possible range of night sky radiance distribution. We used this spectral database as a learning set, to create a colour transformation between different colour spaces. The spectral sensitivity of some digital cameras is also used to determine an optimal transformation matrix from camera defined coordinates to real colours. The theoretical predictions were extended with actual spectral measurements in order to test the models and check the local constituents of night sky radiance. Here, we present an extended modelling of night sky colour and recommendations of its consistent measurement, as well as methods of visualising the colour of night sky in a consistent way, namely using the false colour enhancement.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3120
Permanent link to this record