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Author Fonken, L.K.; Lieberman, R.A.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night exaggerates weight gain and inflammation associated with a high-fat diet in male mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Endocrinology  
  Volume 154 Issue 10 Pages 3817-3825  
  Keywords Adipose Tissue, White/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Animals; Antigens, CD11b/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Appetite Regulation/*radiation effects; Arcuate Nucleus/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Behavior, Animal/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm; Cytokines/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Diet, High-Fat/*adverse effects; Feeding Behavior/radiation effects; Gene Expression Regulation; Glucose Intolerance/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; I-kappa B Kinase/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Insulin Resistance; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Microglia/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Nerve Tissue Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism; Obesity/*etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Random Allocation; *Weight Gain  
  Abstract Elevated nighttime light exposure is associated with symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In industrialized societies, high-fat diet (HFD) and exposure to light at night (LAN) often cooccur and may contribute to the increasing obesity epidemic. Thus, we hypothesized that dim LAN (dLAN) would provoke additional and sustained body mass gain in mice on a HFD. Male mice were housed in either a standard light/dark cycle or dLAN and fed either chow or HFD. Exposure to dLAN and HFD increase weight gain, reduce glucose tolerance, and alter insulin secretion as compared with light/dark cycle and chow, respectively. The effects of dLAN and HFD appear additive, because mice exposed to dLAN that were fed HFD display the greatest increases in body mass. Exposure to both dLAN and HFD also change the timing of food intake and increase TNFalpha and MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue after 4 experimental weeks. Changes in MAC1 gene expression occur more rapidly due to HFD as compared with dLAN; after 5 days of experimental conditions, mice fed HFD already increase MAC1 gene expression in white adipose tissue. HFD also elevates microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and hypothalamic TNFalpha, IL-6, and Ikbkb gene expression. Microglia activation is increased by dLAN, but only among chow-fed mice and dLAN does not affect inflammatory gene expression. These results suggest that dLAN exaggerates weight gain and peripheral inflammation associated with HFD.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 636 Biomedical Research Tower, 460 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-7227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23861373 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 93  
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Author Owens, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obesity: heavy sleepers Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S8-9  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Body Mass Index; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Energy Metabolism/*physiology; Ghrelin/metabolism; Humans; Insulin Resistance/physiology; Leptin/metabolism; Male; Mice; Obesity/*physiopathology; Satiety Response/physiology; Sleep/*physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology; Time Factors; Weight Gain/physiology; Weight Loss/physiology  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698508 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 503  
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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (1) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol  
  Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871  
  Keywords Animals; Ppar; blood pressure; circadian; circadien; insulin resistance; metabolism; metabolisme; recepteurs actives par les proliferateurs de peroxysomes; resistance a l'insuline; tension arterielle  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats, which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a 12 h light – 12 h dark cycle and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lx), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of light-dark variability for systolic blood pressure, but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of systolic blood pressure was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppargamma, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb blood pressure control and augment insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.  
  Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2811  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russart, K.L.G.; Chbeir, S.A.; Nelson, R.J.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night exacerbates metabolic dysfunction in a polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 231 Issue Pages 116574  
  Keywords Animals; diabetes; human health; mouse models; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin Resistance  
  Abstract AIMS: Electric lighting is beneficial to modern society; however, it is becoming apparent that light at night (LAN) is not without biological consequences. Several studies have reported negative effects of LAN on health and behavior in humans and nonhuman animals. Exposure of non-diabetic mice to dim LAN impairs glucose tolerance, whereas a return to dark nights (LD) reverses this impairment. We predicted that exposure to LAN would exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities in TALLYHO/JngJ (TH) mice, a polygenic model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We exposed 7-week old male TH mice to either LD or LAN for 8-10weeks in two separate experiments. After 8weeks of light treatment, we conducted intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing (ipGTT) followed by intraperitoneal insulin tolerance testing (ipITT). In Experiment 1, all mice were returned to LD for 4weeks, and ipITT was repeated. KEY FINDINGS: The major results of this study are i) LAN exposure for 8weeks exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance ii) the effects of LAN on insulin resistance are reversed upon return to LD, iii) LAN exposure results in a greater increase in body weight compared to LD exposure, iv) LAN increases the incidence of mice developing overt T2DM, and v) LAN exposure decreases survival of mice with T2DM. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, LAN exacerbated metabolic abnormalities in a polygenic mouse model of T2DM, and these effects were reversed upon return to dark nights. The applicability of these findings to humans with T2DM needs to be determined.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31207311 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2549  
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