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Author (up) Baugh, K.; Hsu, F.-C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Zhizhin, M.
Title Nighttime Lights Compositing Using the VIIRS Day-Night Band: Preliminary Results Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the Asia-Pacific Advanced Network Abbreviated Journal APAN Proceedings
Volume 35 Issue Pages 70
Keywords remote sensing; light pollution; VIIRS; satellite; radiometry
Abstract Dramatically improved nighttime lights capabilities are presented by the launch of the National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day Night Band (DNB) sensor. Building on 18 years of experience compositing nighttime data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS), NOAA’s NGDC Earth Observation Group has started adapting their algorithms to process these new data. The concept of compositing nighttime data comprises combining only high quality data components over a period of time to improve sensitivity and coverage. For this work, flag image are compiled to describe image quality. The flag categories include: daytime, twilight, stray light, lunar illuminance, noisy edge of scan data, clouds, and no data. High quality data is defined as not having any of these attributes present. Two methods of reprojection are necessary due to data collection characteristics. Custom algorithms have been created to terrain-correct and reproject all data to a common 15 arc second grid. Results of compositing over two time periods in 2012 are presented to demonstrate data quality and initial capabilities. These data can be downloaded at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/eog/viirs/downloadviirsntl.html.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2227-3026 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 197
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Author (up) Bazell, R.J.
Title Star Bright, Street Light, Which Will They See Tonight? Type Magazine Article
Year 1971 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 171 Issue Pages 461
Keywords Society; light pollution; history; historical
Abstract Astronomers are asking that Tucson modify its outdoor lighting so that their view of the heavens will not be obstructed by the city's nighttime glare. Workers at the five observatories: in the mountains surrounding this rapidly growing city of 300,000 fear that in the future they will be unable to observe certain astronomical phenomena, if the amount of light coming from the city continues to increase.
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Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1257
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Author (up) Beccali, M.; Bonomolo, M.; Leccese, F.; Lista, D.; Salvadori, G.
Title On the impact of safety requirements, energy prices and investment costs in street lighting refurbishment design Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Lighting; Economics; Energy; Planning
Abstract Street lighting is an indispensable feature for the night landscape of cities. It is important for road safety, users visual comfort, crime prevention and to augment the perceived personal safety. Realize and maintain an adequate street lighting service is very expensive for municipalities with significant impact on their budgets. For this reason, special attention should be paid to the design of new street lighting systems and to the refurbishment of existing ones, since many of them are inadequate. In light of this it is very important to implement street lighting designs that fulfil lighting requirements avoiding energy waste and light pollution and, at the same time, result economically sustainable for municipalities. In this paper, an original step by step methodology for the lighting, energy and economic analysis of street lighting refurbishment designs has been introduced and explained in detail. The methodology is suitable for use in cities of different sizes. As an applicative example, the methodology has been tested in the town of Pontedera (Italy) and the results are discussed, also providing a sensitivity analysis of the economic feasibility with respect to the variations of electricity prices and investment costs.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2020
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A. (ed)
Title Circadian Disruption by Light at Night: Implications for Mood Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords circadian disruption; sleep; light at night; melanopsin; mood; mental health; Mood Disorders; epigenetics; red light
Abstract Life on Earth has adapted to a consistent 24-h solar cycle. Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior remain synchronized to the environment using light as the most potent entraining cue. During the past century, however, the widespread adoption of electric light has led to `round-the-clock’ societies. Instead of aligning with the environment, individuals follow artificial and often erratic light cycles created by social and work schedules. In particular, exposure to artificial light at night (LAN), termed “light pollution”, has become pervasive over the past 100 years. Virtually every individual living in the U.S. and Europe experiences this aberrant light exposure, and moreover about 20% of the population performs shift work. LAN may disrupt physiological timekeeping, leading to dysregulation of internal processes and misalignment between behavior and the environment. Recent evidence suggests that individuals exposed to excessive LAN, such as night shift workers, have increased risk for depressive disorders, but the biological mechanism remains unspecified. In mammals, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) project light information to (1) the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, regulating circadian rhythms, and (2) to limbic regions, putatively regulating mood. Thus, LAN has the potential to affect both circadian timekeeping and mood. In this dissertation, I present evidence from rodent studies supporting the novel hypothesis that night-time exposure to light disrupts circadian organization and contributes to depressed mood. First, I consider the physiological and behavioral consequences associated with unnatural exposure to LAN. The effects of LAN on circadian output are considered in terms of locomotor activity, the diurnal cortisol rhythm, and diurnal clock protein expression in the brain in Chapter 2. The influence of LAN on behavior and brain plasticity is discussed, with particular focus on depressive-like behavior (Chapter 3) and effects of SSRI treatment (Chapter 4). Effects of LAN on structural plasticity and gene expression in the brain are described, with emphasis on potential correlates of the depressive-like behavior observed under LAN in Chapter 5. Given the prevalence of LAN exposure and its importance, strategies for reversing the effects are offered. Specifically, eliminating LAN quickly reverses behavioral and physiological effects of exposure as described in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6 I report that administration of a pharmacological cytokine inhibitor prevents depressive-like behaviors in LAN, implicating brain inflammation in the behavioral effect. Finally, I demonstrate in Chapter 7 that exposure to red wavelength LAN reduces the effects on brain and behavior, suggesting that LAN acts through specific retinal pathways involving melanopsin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the consequences of LAN, but also outline potential avenues for prevention or intervention.
Address Department of Neuroscience and The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research The Ohio State University
Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor Bedrosian, T.A.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 323
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A.; Fonken, L.K.; Walton, J.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Chronic exposure to dim light at night suppresses immune responses in Siberian hamsters Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett
Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 468-471
Keywords Animals; Blood Bactericidal Activity/immunology; Circadian Rhythm; Cricetinae; Fever/immunology; Hypersensitivity, Delayed/immunology; *Immunity; Light/*adverse effects; Lipopolysaccharides; Locomotion; Phodopus/*immunology
Abstract Species have been adapted to specific niches optimizing survival and reproduction; however, urbanization by humans has dramatically altered natural habitats. Artificial light at night (LAN), termed 'light pollution', is an often overlooked, yet increasing disruptor of habitats, which perturbs physiological processes that rely on precise light information. For example, LAN alters the timing of reproduction and activity in some species, which decreases the odds of successful breeding and increases the threat of predation for these individuals, leading to reduced fitness. LAN also suppresses immune function, an important proxy for survival. To investigate the impact of LAN in a species naive to light pollution in its native habitat, immune function was examined in Siberian hamsters derived from wild-caught stock. After four weeks exposure to dim LAN, immune responses to three different challenges were assessed: (i) delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), (ii) lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, and (iii) bactericide activity of blood. LAN suppressed DTH response and reduced bactericide activity of blood after lipopolysaccharide treatment, in addition to altering daily patterns of locomotor activity, suggesting that human encroachment on habitats via night-time lighting may inadvertently compromise immune function and ultimately fitness.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. tracy.bedrosian@osumc.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21270021; PMCID:PMC3097873 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 90
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