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Author (up) Bruning, A.; Hölker, F.; Franke, S.; Kleiner, W.; Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 543 Issue Pt A Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Animals; Fish; Gonadotropins; Light pollution; Melatonin; Perca fluviatilis; Reproduction; Spectral sensitivity  
  Abstract The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0lx, 1lx, 10lx, 100lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Muggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: werner.kloas(at)igb-berlin.de  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26584071 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1302  
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Author (up) Bryant, J.M.; Hake, H.G. openurl 
  Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
  Year 1911 Publication University of Illinois Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages Bulletin No. 51  
  Keywords Lighting; Energy; Economics; Planning  
  Abstract It is the purpose of this bulletin to make available information concerning street illumination. The suggestion which led to this compilation came from the many inquiries received by the Electrical Engineering Department each year from those interested in framing ordinances permitting corporations or individuals to operate street lighting systems. An attempt has been made to present this information in such a form as to be readily understood by the general public, without requiring any special technical knowledge. The data have been compiled from reliable sources, and checked in many instances by tests conducted by the writers.  
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  Publisher University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, College of Engineering Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2739  
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Author (up) Bukalev, A.V.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Zabezhinskii, M.A.; Semenchenko, A.V.; Anisimov, V.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution increases morbidity and mortality rate from different causes in female rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Advances in Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Adv Gerontol  
  Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages 180-188  
  Keywords light-at-night; spontaneous tumors; nontumor pathology epiphysis; rats; animals; mammals  
  Abstract The influence of different light regimes (constant light, LL; constant darkness, DD; standard light regime, LD, 12 hours light/12 hours darkness; and natural lighting of the northwest of Russia (NL) on non-tumor pathology revealed in the post-mortem examination of female rats has been studied. It was found that keeping 25-days-old animals under LL and NL conditions led to an increase in the number of infectious diseases and the substantially faster development of spontaneous tumors (2.9 and 3.3 diseases per one rat, respectively), variety of nontumor pathology found in dead rats, compared with the animals in standard (standard light) regime (1.72 diseases per one rat). Light deprivation (DD) led to a substantial reduction in the development of new growth, as well as nontumor and infectious diseases (1.06 diseases per one rat), compared to the same parameters in a standard light regime.  
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  ISSN 2079-0570 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 89  
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spectral Sensitivity Modeling and Nighttime Scene Brightness Perception Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Leukos Abbreviated Journal Leukos  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords Vision; human vision; Melanopsin; Outdoor Lighting; Scene brightness; Spectral sensitivity; visual psychophysics  
  Abstract Brightness perception under different light sources is an important visual response, because it is related to perceptions of safety. A growing number of studies have been conducted to assess perceptions of scene brightness under light sources differing in spectral content, including results consistent with a role of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in scene brightness. Data from recent studies of scene brightness perception at light levels experienced under nighttime driving conditions are used to compare different models of brightness perception. The data support a role of increased short-wavelength sensitivity for scene brightness perception and a provisional spectral sensitivity model that takes into account the possible influence of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells is suggested as a basis for further investigation. The implications of such a model on brightness perception under several light sources used in transportation lighting are described.  
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  ISSN 1550-2724 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1073  
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human Factors Impacts of Light-Emitting Diode Airfield Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board  
  Volume 2626 Issue Pages 51-57  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) differ from incandescent light sources in several ways that are relevant to energy and maintenance requirements of airfield lighting systems. They have higher luminous efficacy and, when designed properly, have longer useful operating lives; both factors make LEDs attractive candidates for airfield lighting. The photometric, colorimetric, and temporal characteristics of LEDs also differ from those of incandescent light sources, and these can have important implications for the appearance of runway and taxiway lighting systems. The present paper reviews publications summarizing experimental and analytical investigations designed to assess these implications with respect to the following human factors impacts: color identification, brightness and glare, visibility in fog and haze, response to onset of flashing lights, and stroboscopic effects such as the phantom array. Overall, this review of experimental evidence suggests that, in addition to their reduced energy use and maintenance requirements, LED airfield lighting can be advantageous in comparison with incandescent lighting systems used to delineate airport runways and taxiways.  
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  ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1758  
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