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Author Fonken, L.K.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark nights reverse metabolic disruption caused by dim light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Obesity (Silver Spring)  
  Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages 1159-1164  
  Keywords Animals; Body Mass Index; Energy Intake; Gene Expression; Glucose Tolerance Test; *Light; Male; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology/etiology; *Photoperiod; Weight Gain  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The increasing prevalence of obesity and related metabolic disorders coincides with increasing exposure to light at night. Previous studies report that mice exposed to dim light at night (dLAN) develop symptoms of metabolic syndrome. This study investigated whether mice returned to dark nights after dLAN exposure recover metabolic function. DESIGN AND METHODS: Male Swiss-Webster mice were assigned to either: standard light-dark (LD) conditions for 8 weeks (LD/LD), dLAN for 8 weeks (dLAN/dLAN), LD for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of dLAN (LD/dLAN), and dLAN for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of LD (dLAN/LD). RESULTS: After 4 weeks in their respective lighting conditions both groups initially placed in dLAN increased body mass gain compared to LD mice. Half of the dLAN mice (dLAN/LD) were then transferred to LD and vice versa (LD/dLAN). Following the transfer dLAN/dLAN and LD/dLAN mice gained more weight than LD/LD and dLAN/LD mice. At the conclusion of the study dLAN/LD mice did not differ from LD/LD mice with respect to weight gain and had lower fat pad mass compared to dLAN/dLAN mice. Compared to all other groups dLAN/dLAN mice decreased glucose tolerance as indicated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at week 7, indicating that dLAN/LD mice recovered glucose metabolism. dLAN/dLAN mice also increased MAC1 mRNA expression in peripheral fat as compared to both LD/LD and dLAN/LD mice, suggesting peripheral inflammation is induced by dLAN, but not sustained after return to LD. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that re-exposure to dark nights ameliorates metabolic disruption caused by dLAN exposure.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience and Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author (up) Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1930-7381 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23666854 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 167  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Okamoto, N.; Tomioka, K.; Nezu, S.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night, nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion, and obesity/dyslipidemia in the elderly: a cross-sectional analysis of the HEIJO-KYO study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 98 Issue 1 Pages 337-344  
  Keywords *Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyslipidemias/complications/metabolism/*urine; Female; Humans; Japan; *Light; Male; Melatonin/secretion/*urine; Obesity/complications/metabolism/*urine; Photoperiod  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Obesity and exposure to light at night (LAN) have increased globally. Although LAN suppresses melatonin secretion and disturbs body mass regulation in experimental settings, its associations with melatonin secretion, obesity, and other metabolic consequences in uncontrolled home settings remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the association of exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting with melatonin secretion, obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 528 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8 yr). MEASURES: The intensity of LAN in the bedroom was measured at 1-min intervals during two consecutive nights, along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion and metabolic parameters. RESULTS: Compared with the Dim group (average <3 lux; n = 383), the LAN group (average >/=3 lux; n = 145) showed significantly higher body weight (adjusted mean, 58.8 vs. 56.6 kg; P = 0.01), body mass index (23.3 vs. 22.7 kg/m(2); P = 0.04), waist circumference (84.9 vs. 82.8 cm; P = 0.01), triglyceride levels (119.7 vs. 99.5 mg/dl; P < 0.01), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (128.6 vs. 122.2 mg/dl; P = 0.04), and showed significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (57.4 vs. 61.3 mg/dl; P = 0.02). These associations were independent of numerous potential confounders, including urinary melatonin excretion. Furthermore, LAN exposure is associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for obesity (body mass index: OR, 1.89; P = 0.02; abdominal: OR, 1.62; P = 0.04) and dyslipidemia (OR, 1.72; P = 0.02) independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters. In contrast, urinary melatonin excretion and glucose parameters did not show significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting is associated with impaired obese and lipid parameters independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion in elderly individuals. Moreover, LAN exposure is associated with higher ORs for obesity and dyslipidemia independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author (up) Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23118419 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 168  
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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.; Chisholm, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping artificial lightscapes for ecological studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Methods in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Methods Ecol Evol  
  Volume 5 Issue 6 Pages 534-540  
  Keywords light pollution; urban ecology; landscape ecology; diurnal; nocturnal; night; light  
  Abstract Artificial illumination of the night is increasing globally. There is growing evidence of a range of ecological impacts of artificial light and awareness of light pollution as a significant environmental issue. In urban and suburban areas, complex spatial patterns of light sources, structures and vegetation create a highly heterogeneous night-time light environment for plants and animals.

We developed a method for modelling the night-time light environment at a high spatial resolution in a small urban area for ecological studies. We used the position and height of street lights, and digital terrain and surface models, to predict the direct light intensity at different wavelengths at different heights above the ground surface.

Validation against field measurements of night-time light showed that modelled light intensities in the visible and ultraviolet portions of the spectrum were accurate.

We show how this model can be used to map biologically relevant lightscapes across an urban landscape. We also illustrate the utility of the model using night-time light maps as resistance surfaces in the software package circuitscape to predict potential movement of model nocturnal species between habitat patches and to identify key corridors and barriers to movement and dispersal.

Understanding the ecological effects of artificial light requires knowledge of the light environment experienced by organisms throughout the diurnal and annual cycles, during periods of activity and rest and during different life stages. Our approach to high-resolution mapping of artificial lightscapes can be adapted to the sensitivity to light of different species and to other urban, suburban, rural and industrial landscapes.
 
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  ISSN 2041210X ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 171  
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Author Cinzano, P.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night sky brightness at sites from DMSP-OLS satellite measurements Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 353 Issue 4 Pages 1107-1116  
  Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; site testing; GTOPO30; DMSP  
  Abstract We apply the sky brightness modelling technique introduced and developed by Roy Garstang to high-resolution satellite measurements of upward artificial light flux carried out with the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System and to GTOPO30 (a global digital elevation model by the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Centre) digital elevation data in order to predict the brightness distribution of the night sky at a given site in the primary astronomical photometric bands for a range of atmospheric aerosol contents. This method, based on global data and accounting for elevation, Earth curvature and mountain screening, allows the evaluation of sky glow conditions over the entire sky for any site in the world, to evaluate its evolution, to disentangle the contribution of individual sources in the surrounding territory and to identify the main contributing sources. Sky brightness, naked eye stellar visibility and telescope limiting magnitude are produced as three-dimensional arrays, the axes of which are the position on the sky and the atmospheric clarity. We compare our results with available measurements.  
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  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 172  
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Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The first World Atlas of the artificial night sky brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 328 Issue 3 Pages 689-707  
  Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; site testing; DMSP  
  Abstract We present the first World Atlas of the zenith artificial night sky brightness at sea level. Based on radiance-calibrated high-resolution DMSP satellite data and on accurate modelling of light propagation in the atmosphere, it provides a nearly global picture of how mankind is proceeding to envelop itself in a luminous fog. Comparing the Atlas with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) population density data base, we determined the fraction of population who are living under a sky of given brightness. About two-thirds of the World population and 99 per cent of the population in the United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) and European Union live in areas where the night sky is above the threshold set for polluted status. Assuming average eye functionality, about one-fifth of the World population, more than two-thirds of the United States population and more than one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. Finally, about one-tenth of the World population, more than 40 per cent of the United States population and one sixth of the European Union population no longer view the heavens with the eye adapted to night vision, because of the sky brightness.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 173  
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