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Author Rodrí­guez, A.; Garcí­­a, D.; Rodrí­guez, B.; Cardona, E.; Parpal, L.; Pons, P.
Title Artificial lights and seabirds: is light pollution a threat for the threatened Balearic petrels? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication The Wilson Journal of Ornithologynithology Abbreviated Journal J. of Ornith.
Volume 156 Issue 4 Pages 893-902
Keywords Animals; birds; shearwater; Balearic shearwater; Puffinus mauretanicus; Scopoli's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; European storm-petrel; Hydrobates pelagicus; Balearic Islands; Mediterranean; light pollution; biology; ecology; conservation
Abstract Petrels are among the most threatened group of birds. On top of facing predation by introduced mammals and incidental bycatch, these seabirds have to deal with an emerging threat, light pollution, which is increasing globally. Fledglings are disoriented and attracted to artificial lights in their maiden night flights from their nests to the sea. Once grounded, they are exposed to multiple threats leading to high mortality. We report on numbers of three petrel species (Balearic shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus, Scopoli's shearwater Calonectris diomedea, and European storm-petrel Hydrobates pelagicus) rescued on the Balearic Islands, Mediterranean Sea, in the period 1999-2013. We assessed the proportion of grounded fledglings in the population and colonies impact based on radiance levels measured from a nocturnal satellite image. We also calculated the radius of light pollution impact. At least 304 fledgling birds were found stranded due to attraction to artificial lights, fatally affecting 8.5 % of them. The proportion of grounded fledglings ranged between 0.13 and 0.56 % of the fledglings produced annually. The body mass of Balearic and Scopoli's shearwater fledglings decreased with rescue date. Light-induced mortality increased during the fledging period for Scopoli's shearwaters. Birds were rescued at a mean distance of 4833 m from the nearest colony, and between 30 and 47 % of colonies were exposed to light-polluted areas. Although impact seems to be low for all species, urban development and, consequently, the increase in light pollution in the proximity of the colonies should be taken into account to reduce as much as possible this emerging source of mortality.
Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (CSIC), Avda. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092, Seville, Spain; airamrguez@ebd.csic.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher English Place of Publication English Editor
Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2193-7206 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1185
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Author Riley, W.D.; Bendall, B.; Ives, M.J.; Edmonds, N.J.; Maxwell, D.L.
Title Street lighting disrupts the diel migratory pattern of wild Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts leaving their natal stream Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 330-333 Issue Pages 74-81
Keywords Artificial light; Behaviour; Migration; Salmon; Smolt; Street lighting
Abstract The migratory timing and behaviour of wild Atlantic salmon smolts leaving their natal stream was determined using a passive integrated transponder (PIT) antennae system at a study site on a tributary of the River Itchen, England. Experiments compared the downstream migration of smolts under natural control conditions (2000–2006) with two years (2008 and 2009) when the main downstream exit of the study site was subject to street-lit conditions every alternate night (maximum light intensity measured at the stream surface = 14 lx). Migration of smolts under control conditions was significantly (p < 0.01, n = 170) correlated with sunset. By contrast, street lighting resulted in the timing of migration being random (p = 0.11, n = 7; p = 0.76, n = 34, respectively) with respect to time of day. Furthermore, migration of smolts was significantly (p = 0.01, n = 19) correlated with the time of sunset for fish migrating when the lamp had been off, but random (p = 0.36, n = 22) when the lamp had been on (2008 and 2009 data, combined). This alteration in migratory behaviour due to street lighting may impact fitness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 69
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Author Kamrowski, R.; Limpus, C.; Moloney, J.; Hamann, M.
Title Coastal light pollution and marine turtles: assessing the magnitude of the problem Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal Endang. Species. Res.
Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 85-98
Keywords Artificial light; Orientation; Coastal development; GIS analysis; Vulnerability assessment; turtles; reptiles; animals; marine turtles; Australia; Queensland
Abstract Globally significant numbers of marine turtles nest on Australian beaches; however, the human population of Australia is also heavily concentrated around coastal areas. Coastal development brings with it increases in artificial light. Since turtles are vulnerable to disorientation from artificial light adjacent to nesting areas, the mitigation of disruption caused by light pollution has become an important component of marine turtle conservation strategies in Australia. However, marine turtles are faced with a multitude of anthropogenic threats and managers need to prioritise impacts to ensure limited conservation resources can result in adequate protection of turtles. Knowledge of the extent to which nesting areas may be vulnerable to light pollution is essential to guide management strategies. We use geographical information system analysis to over-lay turtle nesting data onto night-time lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, to assess the proportion of marine turtles in Australia potentially at risk from light pollution. We also identify the Australian nesting sites which may face the greatest threat from artificial light. Our assessment indicates that the majority of nesting turtles appear to be at low risk, but population management units in Western Australia and Queensland are vulnerable to light pollution. The risk to turtles from light generated by industrial developments appears significantly higher than at any other location. Consequently, managers of turtle management units in regions of proposed or on-going industrial development should anticipate potentially disrupted turtle behaviour due to light pollution. Our methodology will be useful to managers of turtles elsewhere.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1863-5407 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 74
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Author Zheleva, M.
Title The dark side of light. Light pollution kills leatherback turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Biodiscovery Abbreviated Journal Biodiscovery
Volume 3 Issue Pages e8930
Keywords Leatherback turtle; animals; reptiles; turtles; marine turtles; light pollution; Tobago
Abstract The leatherback turtle is the largest and most migratory of all sea turtles and deepest diving air-breathing animal. It has unique physiology which allows it to adapt to various habitats ranging from sub-polar to equatorial during its migrations. The leatherback turtle is also the only sea turtle where no cases of tumours have been diagnosed. These unique features add to the arguments for preservation of this endangered species. Here we discuss the effect of light pollution on leatherback turtle hatchlings in Tobago and the measures for their protection.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-2966 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 76
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Author Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E.
Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261
Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida
Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78
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