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Author Marimuthu C.; Kirubakaran V. url  openurl
  Title Carbon and Energy Pay Back Period for the Solar Street Light using Life Cycle Assessment Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of ChemTech Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages 1125-1130  
  Keywords Lighting; Economics  
  Abstract Electronic street lights are big consumers of energy, costing millions to cities and municipalities around the world. Solar Street light is one of the method to reduce the power consumption by generate the energy using the solar Photovoltaic panel. This system includes the power generators (panel), storage (batteries) and management (controller) as well as the light, poles and weather proof housing for batteries. Life cycle inventories are based on manufacturers data combined with additional calculation and assumption. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology used in this research was based on the ISO 14040 and 14044 series. In this paper, the LCA method is used to investigate the environmental impacts of two types of street light technology, conventional street light and solar street light. The cradle to grave analysis for conventional and solar street light includes raw material extraction, production, uses and end of life scenario. The detail investigation has made for the existing solar street light present at Gandhigram Rural University, Dindigul Dist, Tamil Nadu. The specification of the solar street light is 80W capacity, 1.2 m2 area of panel and 135Ah – 12V battery. The total no of poles is 70. For the above system carbon intensity, Energy Pay Back Period and Carbon Pay Back Period have been calculated and compared with conventional street light. The result from the study will support local decision makers when seeking a balance between the environmental, financial and social requirements of public lighting services.  
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  ISSN 0974-4290 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3147  
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Author Fallows, C.; Fallows, M.; Hammerschlag, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of lunar phase on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Biology of Fishes Abbreviated Journal Environ Biol Fish  
  Volume 99 Issue 11 Pages 805-812  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract Predator-prey relationships can be influenced by environmental conditions, including changes in moon phase and associated lunar illumination. Two primary hypotheses have been proposed underlying the effects of moonlight on predator-prey interactions: the predation risk hypothesis and visual acuity hypothesis. However, few studies have tested these hypotheses during twilight hours or involved large mobile aquatic species. In the present study, we evaluated these hypotheses using data collected over 16 years on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) at sunrise. Data from 1476 natural predation events demonstrated shark attack frequency and seal capture success was significantly higher at sunrise during periods of low (0–10 %) versus high (90–100 %) lunar illumination, which is consistent with the visual acuity hypothesis. We propose that during full moon periods, white sharks at night are at a visual and tactical advantage over seals which are silhouetted at the surface in the moonlight and thus easier to isolate in darkness, while sharks remain camouflaged hunting from below through deep water. However, at sunrise, we hypothesize this advantage shifts to seals as the added lunar illumination, combined with emerging sunlight, may decrease shark stealth and increase the ability of seals to detect and avoid sharks. These finding suggest that lunar effects on predator-prey dynamics can be context specific, likely moderated by visual acuity of predators and prey which may change according to the photoperiod.  
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  ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3141  
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Author Liporoni, R.; Cordeiro, G.D.; Prado, P.I.; Schlindwein, C.; Warrant, E.J.; Alves-Dos-Santos, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light intensity regulates flower visitation in Neotropical nocturnal bees Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 15333  
  Keywords Animals; Natural light  
  Abstract The foraging activity of diurnal bees often relies on flower availability, light intensity and temperature. We do not know how nocturnal bees, which fly at night and twilight, cope with these factors, especially as light levels vary considerably from night to day and from night to night due to moon phase and cloud cover. Given that bee apposition compound eyes function at their limits in dim light, we expect a strong dependence of foraging activity on light intensity in nocturnal bees. Besides being limited by minimum light levels to forage, nocturnal bees should also avoid foraging at brighter intensities, which bring increased competition with other bees. We investigated how five factors (light intensity, flower availability, temperature, humidity, and wind) affect flower visitation by Neotropical nocturnal bees in cambuci (Campomanesia phaea, Myrtaceae). We counted visits per minute over 30 nights in 33 cambuci trees. Light intensity was the main variable explaining flower visitation of nocturnal bees, which peaked at intermediate light levels occurring 25 min before sunrise. The minimum light intensity threshold to visit flowers was 0.00024 cd/m(2). Our results highlight the dependence of these nocturnal insects on adequate light levels to explore resources.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, travessa 14, Sao Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32948798 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3139  
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Ghosh, T.; Hsu, F.-C.; Zhizhin, M.; Bazilian, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Dimming of Lights in China during the COVID-19 Pandemic Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 17 Pages 2851  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; VIIRS; Day-night band (DNB); Nighttime lights; COVID-19; Pandemic; VIIRS-DNB  
  Abstract A satellite survey of the cumulative radiant emissions from electric lighting across China reveals a large radiance decline in lighting from December 2019 to February 2020—the peak of the lockdown established to suppress the spread of COVID-19 infections. To illustrate the changes, an analysis was also conducted on a reference set from a year prior to the pandemic. In the reference period, the majority (62%) of China’s population lived in administrative units that became brighter in March 2019 relative to December 2018. The situation reversed in February 2020, when 82% of the population lived in administrative units where lighting dimmed as a result of the pandemic. The dimming has also been demonstrated with difference images for the reference and pandemic image pairs, scattergrams, and a nightly temporal profile. The results indicate that it should be feasible to monitor declines and recovery in economic activity levels using nighttime lighting as a proxy.  
  Address Earth Observation Group, Payne Institute for Public Policy, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA; celvidge(at)mines.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3134  
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Nagare, R.; Price, L.L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Non-visual effects of light: How to use light to promote circadian entrainment and elicit alertness Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 38-62  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract In addition to stimulating the visual system, light incident on the retina stimulates other biological functions, also referred to as non-visual responses. Among the most notable biological functions are human circadian rhythms, which are bodily rhythms that, in constant darkness, oscillate with a period close to, but typically slightly longer than 24 hours. Twenty-four-hour light–dark patterns incident on the retina are the major synchroniser of circadian rhythms to the local time on Earth. Entrainment of circadian rhythms has been implicated in health and well-being. Light can also elicit an acute alerting effect on people, similar to a ‘cup of coffee.’ This review summarises the literature on how light affects entrainment and alertness and how it can be used to achieve these aims.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3133  
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