toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages 091006  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light  
  Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.  
  Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zielińska-Dąbkowska, K. url  openurl
  Title Home Sweet Home. Connecting the dots for healthy evening residential illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication ARC Lighting In Architecture Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 55-60  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract During the twentieth century, lighting designers would commonly use incandescent light sources for residential homes as they provided a visual comfort, with high quality colour rendering properties, along with relaxing ambient atmosphere. Unfortunately, it’s now difficult to buy incandescent light sources because they have been banned in many countries (https://bit.ly/2GwN2Wv). This article addresses some of the challenges in regards to health, brought about by the changeover to new LEDs and other related technologies, and tries to offer some context on how to keep up with these rapid transformations. While we know it’s necessary to limit blue-rich light at night (as it prevents melatonin production and impaires nocturnal sleep), and that it’s important to maximise exposure to the blue wavelength of light in the morning (to trigger circadian timing, increase alertness), there are other issues that are misunderstood and often ignored. This includes flicker from LEDs and electromagnetic fields (EMFs), which can be produced by smart home lighting technology.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2726  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bhukya, K. A., Ramasubbareddy, S., Govinda, K., & Srinivas, T. A. S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive Mechanism for Smart Street Lighting System Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Smart Intelligent Computing and Applications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 160 Issue Pages 69-76  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract The adaptive street light has the ability to adapt to the motion of cycles, cars and pedestrians. It uses motion as well as light sensors to detect the traffic and light around. It dims when there is no movement on the road, and is brightened when there is any activity. Smart street lights are very dissimilar from the old methods of lighting. It is an automated system that will be able to automate the streets. The main objective of these lights is to decrease the utilization of power, while no activity is detected on the street. It will be switched ON while there are pedestrians and cars on the street or else they will get dimmed to 20% of the brightness. The proposed approach gives a method to conserve power by using the PIR sensors to sense the incoming traffic and hence turning ON a cluster of lights surrounding the traffic. As the traffic is passing by, the street lights left behind will dim on its own. Hence, a lot of power can be conserved. Also, during the day time when there is no need of light the LDR sensor will sense the light and the light will remain switched OFF. This smart street light system comes under the domain of smart city.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2723  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pritchard, S.B. url  openurl
  Title Epilogue. Field notes from the end of the world: Light, darkness, Energy, and endscape in polar night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Darkness; Lighting; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract This personal essay describes light(s) and darkness(es) in Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway) during polar night in January 2019. Drawing on autoethnographic methods, I also seek to describe how I experienced the remarkable lightscapes and darkscapes of the far north during winter. I suggest how the history of energy in Longyearbyen has both shaped and been shaped by the “extreme” light/dark cycle of the high Arctic. In the process, I develop the concept of “endscape” to characterize vestiges of a landscape that has been, and will continue to be, transformed by global climate change, and will eventually disappear. This recent experience illustrates the potential of experiential, reflexive ways of contending with light/dark. It also draws attention to tensions in the academic study of light/dark and the history of energy, and how they play out in practice, in the context of a conference held in a remote location that requires scholars to contribute to the continued extraction of fossil fuels –something that most would otherwise decry. I suggest that Longyearbyen is a useful case study for other endscapes in the early 21st C.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2722  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, Q.F.; Yang, G.X.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A survey of the luminance distribution in the nocturnal environment in Shanghai urban areas and the control of luminance of floodlit buildings Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 38 Issue 3 Pages 185-189  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract A survey of the luminance distribution of the nocturnal environment in Shanghai urban areas, which included 11 locations and 16 buildings, was made. The 11 locations could be categorized as commercial, administration, leisure or residential. The average environmental luminance of these was recorded. The authors identified the effects of excessive exterior lighting. The luminance was measured and subjective appraisals made of 16 buildings. The writers have developed an empirical formula for arriving at the brightness level rating for floodlit buildings and recommended corresponding working ranges of luminance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2715  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: