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Author Le Tallec, T.; Théry, M.; Perret, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin concentrations and timing of seasonal reproduction in male mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) exposed to light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal J of Mammalogy  
  Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages 753-760  
  Keywords Animals; light pollution; photobiology; core temperature; locomotor activity; melatonin; Microcebus murinus; primate; testosterone; lemurs; mouse lemur  
  Abstract Adverse effects of light at night are associated with human health problems and with changes in seasonal reproduction in several species. Owing to its role in the circadian timing system, melatonin production is suspected to mediate excess nocturnal light. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of light pollution on the timing of seasonal reproduction on a strict Malagasy long-day breeder, the nocturnal mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). We randomly exposed 12 males in wintering sexual rest to moonlight or to a light-mimicking nocturnal streetlight for 5 weeks. We monitored urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentrations (aMT6s), plasma testosterone concentrations, and testis size, and we recorded daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity. In males exposed to light pollution, we observed a significant decrease in urinary aMT6s concentrations associated with changes in daily rhythm profiles and with activation of reproductive function. These results showed that males entered spontaneous sexual recrudescence leading to a summer acclimatization state, which suggests that light at night disrupts perception of day length cues, leading to an inappropriate photoentrainment of seasonal rhythms.  
  Address UMR 7179 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle , 1 avenue du petit château, 91800 Brunoy, France; thery(at)mnhn.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1348  
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Author Marchant, P.; Hale, J.D.; Sadler, J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does changing to brighter road lighting improve road safety? Multilevel longitudinal analysis of road traffic collision frequency during the relighting of a UK city Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health Abbreviated Journal J. Epidemiol. Community Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Public Safety; traffic safety; Roadway lighting; road safety; road traffic collisions; United Kingdom  
  Abstract Background A step change in the night environment is taking place, with the large-scale installation of bright, broad-spectrum road lighting such as white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). One justification for this is a reduction in road traffic collisions (RTCs). This study aimed to estimate the effect of new lighting on personal injury RTCs within a large UK city.

Methods We analysed a 9-year time series of weekly RTC personal injury counts in 132 areas of the city using multilevel modelling. The RTC rate over a full 24-hour period was the primary outcome; darkness and daylight RTC rates were secondary. The background change in RTC rate was separated from the change associated with the number of newly installed bright lamps by including a polynomial underlying time trend for the logarithm of the mean number of collisions per week for each area. The study was based on a rigorous, predesigned and archived protocol.

Results Within-area coefficients for the broad lighting effect were positive; as the number of bright lamps in an area increased, so did the RTC rate. The estimate for the increase in the within-area 24-hour RTC rate is 11% (95% CI 2% to 20%). The estimate of darkness-only RTCs is 16% (95% CI 2% to 32%). If the effect of lighting on darkness RTC rate is adjusted by that for daylight, one obtains 4% (95% CI −12% to +23%).

Conclusion No evidence was found for bright lamps leading to an improvement in road safety in any of the analyses. For this city, introducing brighter road lighting may have compromised safety rather than reducing harm.
 
  Address Room 221, Leighton Hall, Leeds Beckett University, Headingley Campus, Leeds LS1 3HE, UK; p.marchant(at) leedsbeckett.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher BML Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2835  
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Author Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages 091006  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light  
  Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.  
  Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727  
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Author Kolláth, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring and modelling light pollution at the Zselic Starry Sky Park Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.  
  Volume 218 Issue Pages 012001  
  Keywords Skyglow; modeling; measurement; SQM; sky brightness; Zselic; International Dark Sky Park; Hungry; measurements; modeling; light pollution; skyglow; radiative transfer  
  Abstract One of the first 'International Dark-sky Parks' in Europe was established at the Zselic Landscape Protection Area in Hungary. A special monitoring program has been carrying on to survey the quality of the night sky using 'Sky Quality Meters' and DSLR cameras. The main conclusion of our measurements is that the local villages have only a minimal effect on the quality of the sky. There are light-domes due to the neighbouring cities only close to the horizon, the main source of obtrusive light is the city of Kaposvár. The anthropogenic component of zenith luminance of the night sky is obtained as the function of the distance from the city centre of Kaposvár. Our data were modelled by radiation transfer calculations. These results can help to draw attention to the energy emitted useless to the space and to protect our nocturnal landscape of nature parks for the next generations.  
  Address Konkoly Observatory, Konkoly Thege u. 15-17, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary; kollath(at)konkoly.hu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1742-6596 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1436  
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Author John Bullough url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors Affecting Sign Visibility, Conspicuity, and Legibility: Review and Annotated Bibliography Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Interdisciplinary Journal of Signage and Wayfinding Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 2-25  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract This paper summarizes published research studies, technical reports and codes and standards related to the visibility (i.e., conspicuity and legibility) of signage. In the summary that follows, publications are grouped and discussed according to several different topics. First, the typographic and symbolic characteristics of signs and the information they carry are described (e.g., letter size, font selection, etc.); second, photometric, colorimetric and temporal properties of signs as they affect visibility; finally, environmental considerations (e.g., daytime versus nighttime viewing, whether a sign is located in a rural or urban area, etc.) as they influence sign design are reviewed. Annotated summaries of each publication in the literature review are included at the end of this paper.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1762  
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