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Author Falchi, F.; Furgoni, R.; Gallaway, T.A.; Rybnikova, N.A.; Portnov, B.A.; Baugh, K.; Cinzano, P.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution in USA and Europe: The good, the bad and the ugly Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Management  
  Volume 248 Issue Pages 109227  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; gross domestic product; light pollution; Economics  
  Abstract Light pollution is a worldwide problem that has a range of adverse effects on human health and natural eco-systems. Using data from the New World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, VIIRS-recorded radiance and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) data, we compared light pollution levels, and the light flux to the population size and GDP at the State and County levels in the USA and at Regional (NUTS2) and Province (NUTS3) levels inEurope. We found 6800-fold differences between the most and least polluted regions in Europe, 120-fold differences in their light flux per capita, and 267-fold differences influx per GDP unit. Yet, we found even greater differences between US counties: 200,000-fold differences in sky pollution, 16,000-fold differences in light flux per capita, and 40,000-fold differences in light flux per GDP unit. These findings may inform policy-makers, helping to reduce energy waste and adverse environmental, cultural and health consequences associated with light pollution.  
  Address STIL – Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dell'Inquinamento Luminoso, Light Pollution Science and Technology Institute, Thiene, Italy; Italy. falchi@lightpollution.it(at)istil.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2593  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Houpt, K.A.; Erb, H.N.; Coria-Avila, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Sleep of Shelter Dogs Was Not Disrupted by Overnight Light Rather than Darkness in a Crossover Trial Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 9 Issue 10 Pages 794  
  Keywords Animals; dog; influence of light; night-time behavior; shelter; sleep  
  Abstract Dogs in shelters may be unattended at night. The purpose of this study is to describe the night-time behavior of dogs in a shelter and to determine if artificial light affected their sleeping patterns. Ten dogs were video-recorded under both light and dark conditions and their behavior recorded using focal animal sampling. The dogs were lying down 649 +/- 40 min (mean +/- SD) in the light condition and 629 +/- 58 min in the dark condition each night. They awoke, stood up, turned around and then lay down again every 48 to 50 min. There was no significant difference in time spent lying between the two conditions (p > 0.05). Light did not seem to affect their behavior. The conclusion is that dogs in shelters may sleep in the absence of people and that light does not disrupt their sleep patterns.  
  Address Centro de Investigaciones Cerebrales, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa-Enriquez 91090, Mexico. gcoria@uv.mx  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31615005 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2703  
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Author Langbehn, T.; Aksnes, D.; Kaartvedt, S.; Fiksen, Ø.; Jørgensen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light comfort zone in a mesopelagic fish emerges from adaptive behaviour along a latitudinal gradient Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 623 Issue Pages 161-174  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract Throughout the oceans, small fish and other micronekton migrate between daytimedepths of several hundred meters and near-surface waters at night. These diel vertical migrationsof mesopelagic organisms structure pelagic ecosystems through trophic interactions, and are akey element in the biological carbon pump. However, depth distributions and migration ampli-tude vary greatly. Suggested proximate causes of the migration such as oxygen, temperature, andlight often correlate and therefore the causal underpinnings have remained unclear. Using meso-pelagic fishes and the Norwegian Sea as a study system, we developed a dynamic state variablemodel that finds optimal migration patterns that we validate with acoustic observations along alatitudinal gradient. The model describes predation risk and bioenergetics, and maximizes ex -pected energy surplus, a proxy for Darwinian fitness. The model allows us to disentangle the driv-ers of migration and make predictions about depth distribution and related fitness consequencesalong a latitudinal trajectory with strong gradients in environmental drivers and vertical distribu-tion of scattering layers. We show that the model-predicted vertical migration of mesopelagicfishes matches that observed along this transect. For most situations, modelled mesopelagic fishbehaviour can be well described by a light comfort zone near identical to that derived from obser-vations. By selectively keeping light or temperature constant, the model reveals that temperature,in comparison with light, has little effect on depth distribution. We find that water clarity, whichlimits how deeply light can penetrate into the ocean, structures daytime depths, while surfacelight at night controlled the depth of nocturnal ascents.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2598  
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Author Foster, J.J.; Kirwan, J.D.; El Jundi, B.; Smolka, J.; Khaldy, L.; Baird, E.; Byrne, M.J.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Johnsen, S.; Dacke, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Orienting to polarized light at night – matching lunar skylight to performance in a nocturnal beetle Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol  
  Volume 222 Issue Pt 2 Pages jeb188532  
  Keywords Animals; Natural skylight; insects; South African dung beetle; Escarabaeus satyrus; polarized light; Orientation  
  Abstract For polarized light to inform behaviour, the typical range of degrees of polarization observable in the animal's natural environment must be above the threshold for detection and interpretation. Here, we present the first investigation of the degree of linear polarization threshold for orientation behaviour in a nocturnal species, with specific reference to the range of degrees of polarization measured in the night sky. An effect of lunar phase on the degree of polarization of skylight was found, with smaller illuminated fractions of the moon's surface corresponding to lower degrees of polarization in the night sky. We found that the South African dung beetle Escarabaeus satyrus can orient to polarized light for a range of degrees of polarization similar to that observed in diurnal insects, reaching a lower threshold between 0.04 and 0.32, possibly as low as 0.11. For degrees of polarization lower than 0.23, as measured on a crescent moon night, orientation performance was considerably weaker than that observed for completely linearly polarized stimuli, but was nonetheless stronger than in the absence of polarized light.  
  Address Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, Lund University, Solvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30530838 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2599  
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Author Cabrera-Cruz, S.A.; Smolinsky, J.A.; McCarthy, K.P.; Buler, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban areas affect flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume 88 Issue 12 Pages 1873-1887  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Aeroecology; bird migration; flight altitude; light pollution; radar; urbanization  
  Abstract 1.Urban areas affect terrestrial ecological processes and local weather, but we know little about their effect on aerial ecological processes. 2.Here, we identify urban from non-urban areas based on the intensity of artificial light at night (ALAN) in the landscape, and, along with weather covariates, evaluate the effect of urbanization on flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds. 3.Birds are attracted to ALAN, hence we predicted that altitudes would be lower over urban than over non-urban areas. However, other factors associated with urbanization may also affect flight altitudes. For example, surface temperature and terrain roughness are higher in urban areas, increasing air turbulence, height of the boundary layer, and affecting local winds. 4.We used data from nine weather surveillance radars in the eastern US to estimate altitudes at five quantiles of the vertical distribution of birds migrating at night over urban and non-urban areas during five consecutive spring and autumn migration seasons. We fit generalized linear mixed models by season for each of the five quantiles of bird flight altitude and their differences between urban and non-urban areas. 5.After controlling for other environmental variables and contrary to our prediction, we found that birds generally fly higher over urban areas compared to rural areas in spring, and marginally higher at the mid layers of the vertical distribution in autumn. We also identified a small interaction effect between urbanization and crosswind speed, and between urbanization and surface air temperature, on flight altitudes. We also found that the difference in flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds between urban and non-urban areas varied among radars and seasons, but were consistently higher over urban areas throughout the years sampled. 6.Our results suggest that the effects of urbanization on wildlife extend into the aerosphere, and are complex, stressing the need of understanding the influence of anthropogenic factors on airspace habitat. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, University of Delaware, Delaware, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31330569 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2604  
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