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Author Hsu, C.-N.; Tain, Y.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and Circadian Signaling Pathway in Pregnancy: Programming of Adult Health and Disease Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; circadian rhythm; developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD); developmental programming; glucocorticoid; hypertension; light; melatonin; pregnancy  
  Abstract Light is a crucial environmental signal that affects elements of human health, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms. A suboptimal environment during pregnancy can increase the risk of offspring developing a wide range of chronic diseases in later life. Circadian rhythm disruption in pregnant women may have deleterious consequences for their progeny. In the modern world, maternal chronodisruption can be caused by shift work, jet travel across time zones, mistimed eating, and excessive artificial light exposure at night. However, the impact of maternal chronodisruption on the developmental programming of various chronic diseases remains largely unknown. In this review, we outline the impact of light, the circadian clock, and circadian signaling pathways in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, we show how to induce maternal chronodisruption in animal models, examine emerging research demonstrating long-term negative implications for offspring health following maternal chronodisruption, and summarize current evidence related to light and circadian signaling pathway targeted therapies in pregnancy to prevent the development of chronic diseases in offspring.  
  Address Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32210175 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2874  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leveau, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) Is the Main Driver of Nocturnal Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) Foraging in Urban Areas Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Columba livia; Latin America; artificial light at night; circadian rhythm; noise; temporal homogenization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most extreme environmental alterations in urban areas, which drives nocturnal activity in diurnal species. Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica), a common species in urban centers worldwide, has been observed foraging at night in urban areas. However, the role of ALAN in the nocturnal activity of this species is unknown. Moreover, studies addressing the relationship between ALAN and nocturnal activity of diurnal birds are scarce in the Southern Hemisphere. The objective of this study is to assess the environmental factors associated with nocturnal activity of the Feral Pigeon in Argentinian cities. Environmental conditions were compared between sites where pigeons were seen foraging and randomly selected sites where pigeons were not recorded foraging. Nocturnal foraging by the Feral Pigeon was recorded in three of four surveyed cities. ALAN was positively related to nocturnal foraging activity in Salta and Buenos Aires. The results obtained suggest that urbanization would promote nocturnal activity in Feral Pigeons. Moreover, nocturnal activity was mainly driven by ALAN, which probably alters the circadian rhythm of pigeons.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia, Genetica y Evolucion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires – IEGEBA (CONICET – UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab 2, Piso 4, Buenos Aires 1426, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32224903 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2876  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between light exposure at night and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: cross-sectional analysis of the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Bipolar disorder; circadian rhythm; dark; light at night; manic symptom  
  Abstract Previous studies have found that keeping the room dark at night was associated with a decrease in manic symptoms for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the association between light at night of real-life conditions and manic symptoms is unclear. We investigated the association between bedroom light exposure at night and manic symptoms in BD patients. One-hundred and eighty-four outpatients with BD participated in this cross-sectional study. The average light intensity at night during sleep was evaluated using a portable photometer for seven consecutive nights. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and scores >/=5 were treated as a “hypomanic state.” The median (interquartile range) YMRS score was 2.0 (0-5.0), and 52 (28.2%) participants were in a hypomanic state. The prevalence of a hypomanic state was significantly higher in the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than in those with <3 lux (36.7% versus 21.9%; P = .02). In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for BD type, depressive symptoms, sleep duration, and daytime physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) for a hypomanic state was significantly higher for the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than for those with <3 lux (OR: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.22, P = .02). This association remained significant at the cutoff value of YMRS score >/=6 (OR: 2.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-5.46; P = .02). The findings of this study indicate bedroom light exposure at night is significantly associated with manic symptoms in BD patients. Although the results of this cross-sectional investigation do not necessarily imply causality, they may serve to inform beneficial nonpharmacological intervention and personalized treatment of BD patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32238002 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2879  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pandharipande, A.; Ramasamy, S.; Anderson, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social Impact of Connected Landmark Lighting: A Social Sensing Approach Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication IEEE Internet of Things Magazine Abbreviated Journal IEEE Internet Things M.  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 64-67  
  Keywords Lighting; Society  
  Abstract The benefits of using light emitting diode (LED) lighting for landmarks extend beyond energy savings to the use of illumination for creating visual identity, placemaking, and increasing tourism. While measuring energy consumption is possible with metering technologies, thereby quantifying savings in energy costs, quantification of the social impact of landmark lighting is not straightforward. Measuring and monitoring social impact metrics is key to stakeholders investing in new connected LED lighting systems or upgrades of conventional lighting in order to realize the benefits of lighting that are beyond energy sustainability. We consider social sensing as an approach to quantifying social impact of landmark lighting. Using lighting at the Empire State Building and Bay Bridge as case studies, social sensing querying and data analytics aspects are presented. A number of practical lessons and technical directions for the use of social sensing in connected landmark lighting are then laid out.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2576-3180 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leonard, J.P.; Tewes, M.E.; Lombardi, J.V.; Wester, D.W.; Campbell, T.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of sun angle, lunar illumination, and diurnal temperature on temporal movement rates of sympatric ocelots and bobcats in South Texas Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages e0231732  
  Keywords Animals; moonlight  
  Abstract Sympatric ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and bobcats (Lynx rufus) in South Texas show substantial overlap in body size, food habits, and habitat use. Consequently, we explore whether temporal niche partitioning may explain ocelot and bobcat coexistence. We investigated the influence of sun angle, lunar illumination, and maximum diurnal temperature on temporal movement rates of sympatric ocelots (n = 8) and bobcats (n = 6) using a combination of high-frequency GPS locations and bi-axial accelerometer data. We demonstrated that accelerometer data could be used to predict movement rates, providing a nearly continuous measure of animal activity and supplementing GPS locations. Ocelots showed a strong nocturnal activity pattern with the highest movement rates at night whereas bobcats showed a crepuscular activity pattern with the highest movement rates occurring around sunrise and sunset. Although bobcat activity levels were lower during the day, bobcat diurnal activity was higher than ocelot diurnal activity. During warmer months, bobcats were more active on nights with high levels of lunar illumination. In contrast, ocelots showed the highest nocturnal activity levels during periods of low lunar illumination. Ocelots showed reduced diurnal activity on hotter days. Our results indicate that ocelot and bobcat coexistence in South Texas can be partially explained by temporal niche partitioning, although both felids showed periods of overlapping activity during nocturnal and crepuscular periods.  
  Address East Foundation, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32324759 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2891  
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