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Author Finch, D.; Smith, B.R.; Marshall, C.; Coomber, F.G.; Kubasiewicz, L.M.; Anderson, M.; Wright, P.G.R.; Mathews, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on European Hedgehog Activity at Supplementary Feeding Stations Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; Erinaceus europaeus; activity pattern; camera trap; citizen science; fragmentation; hedgehogs; light pollution; lightscape; urbanisation  
  Abstract : Artificial light at night (ALAN) can have negative consequences for a wide range of taxa. However, the effects on nocturnal mammals other than bats are poorly understood. A citizen science camera trapping experiment was therefore used to assess the effect of ALAN on the activity of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) at supplementary feeding stations in UK gardens. A crossover design was implemented at 33 gardens with two treatments-artificial light and darkness-each of which lasted for one week. The order of treatment depended on the existing lighting regime at the feeding station: dark treatments were applied first at dark feeding stations, whereas light treatments were used first where the station was already illuminated. Although temporal changes in activity patterns in response to the treatments were noted in some individuals, the direction of the effects was not consistent. Similarly, there was no overall impact of ALAN on the presence or feeding activities of hedgehogs in gardens where supplementary feeding stations were present. These findings are somewhat reassuring insofar as they demonstrate no net negative effect on a species thought to be in decline, in scenarios where the animals are already habituated to supplementary feeding. However, further research is needed to examine long-term effects and the effects of lighting on hedgehog prey, reproductive success and predation risk.  
  Address Mammal Society, London E9 6EJ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32354129 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Aerosol characterization using satellite remote sensing of light pollution sources at night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 495 Issue 1 Pages L76-L80  
  Keywords Skyglow; Radiative transfer; Light scattering; Aerosols  
  Abstract A demanding challenge in atmospheric research is the night-time characterization of aerosols using passive techniques, that is, by extracting information from scattered light that has not been emitted by the observer. Satellite observations of artificial night-time lights have been used to retrieve some basic integral parameters, like the aerosol optical depth. However, a thorough analysis of the scattering processes allows one to obtain substantially more detailed information on aerosol properties. In this letter, we demonstrate a practicable approach for determining the aerosol particle size number distribution function in the air column, based on the measurement of the angular radiance distribution of the scattered light emitted by night- time lights of cities and towns, recorded from low Earth orbit. The method is self-calibrating and does not require the knowledge of the absolute city emissions. The input radiance data are readily available from several spaceborne platforms, like the VIIRS-DNB radiometer onboard the Suomi-NPP satellite.  
  Address Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48 Bratislava, Slovakia; Miroslav.Kocifaj(at)savba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher OUP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1745-3925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2910  
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Author Chen, H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, R.; Cai, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Revisiting the environmental Kuznets curve for city-level CO2 emissions: based on corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data in China Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production  
  Volume Issue Pages 121575  
  Keywords Remore Sensing; China; carbon emissions; CO2 emissions; night lights; NPP-VIIRS; VIIRS-DNB; VIIRS-DNB; Kuznets curve  
  Abstract With the increasing trend of global warming, the Chinese government faces tremendous pressure to reduce CO2 emissions. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure CO2 emissions at the city scale in China and examine the environmental Kuznets curve, thereby providing a reference for decision-making. Corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data were used to accurately estimate carbon dioxide emissions at the provincial and city scales in China. Then, based on the STRIPAT model, 291 cities in China were used to verify the environmental Kuznets curve. Our results show that on the provincial scale, the R2 between the estimated value and the statistical value of carbon dioxide reaches 0.85. Western cities in China emit more CO2, as do economically developed cities and industry- and mining-dominated cities. There are two CO2 emission hot spots in the north and one cold spot in the south. It was found that the environmental Kuznets curve on the city scale exists. This study has practical value in utilizing NPP-VIIRS data for the estimation of city CO2 emissions. The results also have academic value for determining factors that contribute to carbon dioxide emissions and can provide a reference for relevant decision makers. This study could be considered the first to simulate CO2 emissions at the provincial and city levels in China based on a NPP-VIIRS nighttime light model to explore the associated geographical distribution characteristics and potential influencing factors.  
  Address State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, 830011, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2917  
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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; United Kingdom; National parks; skyglow; VIIRS-DNB; albedo; landcover; light emissions; light pollution; protected areas; skyglow; sky brightness; urbanization  
  Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK; d.t.c.cox(at )exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2920  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sun, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Gao, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street-Scale Analysis of Population Exposure to Light Pollution Based on Remote Sensing and Mobile Big Data-Shenzhen City as a Case Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Luojia 1-01; NTL remote sensing; light pollution; population exposure to light pollution; residential area  
  Abstract Most studies on light pollution are based on light intensity retrieved from nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing with less consideration of the population factors. Furthermore, the coarse spatial resolution of traditional NTL remote sensing data limits the refined applications in current smart city studies. In order to analyze the influence of light pollution on populated areas, this study proposes an index named population exposure to light pollution (PELP) and conducts a street-scale analysis to illustrate spatial variation of PELP among residential areas in cites. By taking Shenzhen city as a case, multi-source data were combined including high resolution NTL remote sensing data from the Luojia 1-01 satellite sensor, high-precision mobile big data for visualizing human activities and population distribution as well as point of interest (POI) data. Results show that the main influenced areas of light pollution are concentrated in the downtown and core areas of newly expanded areas with obvious deviation corrected like traditional serious light polluted regions (e.g., ports). In comparison, commercial-residential mixed areas and village-in-city show a high level of PELP. The proposed method better presents the extent of population exposure to light pollution at a fine-grid scale and the regional difference between different types of residential areas in a city.  
  Address TalkingData Co., Ltd., Beijing 100027, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32403250 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2921  
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