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Author Mortazavi, S.A.R.; Faraz, M.; Laalpour, S.; Kaveh Ahangar, A.; Eslami, J.; Zarei, S.; Mortazavi, G.; Gheisari, F.; Mortazavi, S.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to Blue Light Emitted from Smartphones in an Environment with Dim Light at Night Alters the Reaction Time of University Students Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Shiraz E-Medical Journal Abbreviated Journal Shiraz E-Med J  
  Volume Issue Pages e88230  
  Keywords Human Health; Blue light; smartphone; Reaction Time; shift work  
  Abstract Background: Substantial evidence now indicates that exposure to visible light at night can be linked to a wide spectrum of disorders ranging from obesity to cancer. More specifically, it has been shown that exposure to short wavelengths in the blue region at night is associated with adverse health effects, such as sleep problems.

Objectives: This study aimed at investigating if exposure to blue light emitted from common smartphones in an environment with dim light at night alters human reaction time.

Methods: Visual reaction time (VRT) of 267 male and female university students were recorded using a simple blind computer-assisted VRT test, respectively. Volunteer university students, who provided their informed consent were randomly divided to two groups of control (N = 126 students) and intervention (N = 141 students). All participants were asked to go to bed at 23:00. Participants in the intervention group were asked to use their smartphones from 23:00 to 24:00 (watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes), while the control group only stayed in bed under low lighting condition, i.e. dim light. Before starting the experiment and after 60 minutes of smartphone use, reaction time was recorded in both groups.

Results: The mean reaction times in the intervention and the control groups before the experiment (23:00) did not show a statistically difference (P = 0.449). The reaction time in the intervention group significantly increased from 412.64 ± 105.60 msec at 23:00 to 441.66 ± 125.78 msec at 24:00 (P = 0.0368) while in the control group, there was no statistically significant difference between the mean reaction times at 23:00 and 24:00.

Conclusions: To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study, which showed that exposure to blue-rich visible light emitted from widely used smartphones increases visual reaction time, which would eventually result in a delay in human responses to different hazards. These findings indicate that people, such as night shift or on call workers, who need to react to stresses rapidly should avoid using their smartphones in a dim light at night.
 
  Address Student Research Committee, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1735-1391 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2534  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, Q.; Ru, T.; Zhai, D.; Huang, X.; Li, Y.; Qian, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Half a century of Lighting Research & Technology: A bibliometric review Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 1477153519857788  
  Keywords History; Lighting; Review  
  Abstract Lighting Research & Technology (LRT) is an influential journal in the field of light and lighting dating back to 1969. To celebrate its 50th birthday, the current study explored its bibliometric characteristics and mapped the bibliographic information graphically through VOSviewer software. This analysis found that the number of papers has steadily increased during recent years. The most productive and cited country was the United Kingdom. The most productive and cited institution was Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The most prolific author was Steve Fotios and the most cited author was Mark Rea. The journal most cited together with LRT was Leukos. LRT has become more and more international and interdisciplinary over the last five decades. Suggestions for the development of LRT are provided. Develpoments over the last 50 years have turned LRT into one of leading journals in the light and lighting field, one which has a bright future.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2573  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quinn, D.; Kress, D.; Chang, E.; Stein, A.; Wegrzynski, M.; Lentink, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How lovebirds maneuver through lateral gusts with minimal visual information Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 30 Pages 15033-15041  
  Keywords Animals; bird; control; flight; gust; visual  
  Abstract Flying birds maneuver effectively through lateral gusts, even when gust speeds are as high as flight speeds. What information birds use to sense gusts and how they compensate is largely unknown. We found that lovebirds can maneuver through 45 degrees lateral gusts similarly well in forest-, lake-, and cave-like visual environments. Despite being diurnal and raised in captivity, the birds fly to their goal perch with only a dim point light source as a beacon, showing that they do not need optic flow or a visual horizon to maneuver. To accomplish this feat, lovebirds primarily yaw their bodies into the gust while fixating their head on the goal using neck angles of up to 30 degrees . Our corroborated model for proportional yaw reorientation and speed control shows how lovebirds can compensate for lateral gusts informed by muscle proprioceptive cues from neck twist. The neck muscles not only stabilize the lovebirds' visual and inertial head orientations by compensating low-frequency body maneuvers, but also attenuate faster 3D wingbeat-induced perturbations. This head stabilization enables the vestibular system to sense the direction of gravity. Apparently, the visual horizon can be replaced by a gravitational horizon to inform the observed horizontal gust compensation maneuvers in the dark. Our scaling analysis shows how this minimal sensorimotor solution scales favorably for bigger birds, offering local wind angle feedback within a wingbeat. The way lovebirds glean wind orientation may thus inform minimal control algorithms that enable aerial robots to maneuver in similar windy and dark environments.  
  Address Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305; danquinn@virginia.edu dlentink@stanford.edu  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31289235 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2577  
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Author Kim, K.-N.; Jo, Y.-C.; Huang, Z.-J.; Song, H.-S.; Ryu, K.-H.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of green light illumination at night on biological characteristics of the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull Entomol Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages S0007485319000397  
  Keywords Animals; Mythimna separata; biological characteristic; green light; longevity; reproduction  
  Abstract The oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata is an important crop pest in eastern Asia. Nocturnal insects, including nocturnal moths, have phototactic behavior to an artificial light source. Phototactic behavior in insects is species-specific in response to different wavelengths of light sources. Our previous study showed that green (520 nm) light emitting diode (LED) light resulted in a significantly higher phototactic behavior in M. separata moths compared to the other wavelength LED lights. The goal of the present study is to investigate the influence of green light illumination on biological characteristics of different developmental stages in M. separata. Our results revealed that when different developmental stages of M. separata were exposed to the green light illumination in a dark period, several biological characteristics in all developmental stages except for egg stage were positively changed, but those of F1 generation M. separata which are next generation of the adults exposed to the green light did not significantly change compared with the control level. These findings suggest that green light illumination at night (or dark period) has a positive effect on the development and longevity of M. separata.  
  Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University,Wuhan, Hubei,China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31203829 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2585  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maggio, R.; Vaglini, F.; Rossi, M.; Fasciani, I.; Pietrantoni, I.; Marampon, F.; Corsini, G.U.; Scarselli, M.; Millan, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Parkinson's disease and light: The bright and the Dark sides Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Brain Research Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Brain Res Bull  
  Volume 150 Issue Pages 290-296  
  Keywords Humah Health; Light pollution; Near-infrared light; Parkinson's disease  
  Abstract Light exerts a major influence on human behaviour and health, mainly owing to the importance of sight in our lives, but also due to its entrainment of daily rhythms via the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master pacemaker. Light may also be a useful clinical medium, as in lumino-therapy for the improvement of depressed mood. Further, as discussed herein, local application of near infrared light to the substantia nigra exerts neuroprotective properties in models of Parkinson's disease. However, light also has a darker side. In general, as regards the growing problem to human health – and the natural world – of excess exposure to artificial light: both urban glow and ubiquitous screens. Moreover, over-exposure to light, in particular fluorescent light, disrupts circadian rhythms and sleep, and may damage dopaminergic neurons. Is it, then, a neglected risk factor for Parkinson's disease? The present article discusses epidemiological and experimental evidence supporting beneficial and potentially deleterious impact of light on dopaminergic neurons and highlights the mechanisms whereby light might influence neuronal tissue.  
  Address Centre for Innovation in Neuropsychiatry, Institut de Recherches Servier, 125, Chemin de Ronde, 78290, Croissy sur Seine, France. Electronic address: mark.millan@servier.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-9230 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31226407 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2586  
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