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Author Wood, B.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light level and duration of exposure determine the impact of self-luminous tablets on melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Ergonomics Abbreviated Journal Appl Ergon  
  Volume (down) 44 Issue 2 Pages 237-240  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Computers, Handheld; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/*biosynthesis; Photoperiod; Saliva/*metabolism; Sleep/radiation effects; Time Factors; Young Adult; melatonin  
  Abstract Exposure to light from self-luminous displays may be linked to increased risk for sleep disorders because these devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak sensitivity of melatonin suppression. Thirteen participants experienced three experimental conditions in a within-subjects design to investigate the impact of self-luminous tablet displays on nocturnal melatonin suppression: 1) tablets-only set to the highest brightness, 2) tablets viewed through clear-lens goggles equipped with blue light-emitting diodes that provided 40 lux of 470-nm light at the cornea, and 3) tablets viewed through orange-tinted glasses (dark control; optical radiation <525 nm approximately 0). Melatonin suppressions after 1-h and 2-h exposures to tablets viewed with the blue light were significantly greater than zero. Suppression levels after 1-h exposure to the tablets-only were not statistically different than zero; however, this difference reached significance after 2 h. Based on these results, display manufacturers can determine how their products will affect melatonin levels and use model predictions to tune the spectral power distribution of self-luminous devices to increase or to decrease stimulation to the circadian system.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. woodb5@rpi.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6870 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22850476 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 136  
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Author Bedrosian, T.A.; Vaughn, C.A.; Galan, A.; Daye, G.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal light exposure impairs affective responses in a wavelength-dependent manner Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal J Neurosci  
  Volume (down) 33 Issue 32 Pages 13081-13087  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Food Deprivation/physiology; Food Preferences/physiology/radiation effects; Fourier Analysis; Gene Expression Regulation/radiation effects; Hippocampus/pathology/radiation effects; Immobility Response, Tonic/radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Mood Disorders/*etiology/pathology; Motor Activity/physiology/radiation effects; Phodopus; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos/metabolism; Social Behavior; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism; Time Factors  
  Abstract Life on earth is entrained to a 24 h solar cycle that synchronizes circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior; light is the most potent entraining cue. In mammals, light is detected by (1) rods and cones, which mediate visual function, and (2) intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which primarily project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus to regulate circadian rhythms. Recent evidence, however, demonstrates that ipRGCs also project to limbic brain regions, suggesting that, through this pathway, light may have a role in cognition and mood. Therefore, it follows that unnatural exposure to light may have negative consequences for mood or behavior. Modern environmental lighting conditions have led to excessive exposure to light at night (LAN), and particularly to blue wavelength lights. We hypothesized that nocturnal light exposure (i.e., dim LAN) would induce depressive responses and alter neuronal structure in hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). If this effect is mediated by ipRGCs, which have reduced sensitivity to red wavelength light, then we predicted that red LAN would have limited effects on brain and behavior compared with shorter wavelengths. Additionally, red LAN would not induce c-Fos activation in the SCN. Our results demonstrate that exposure to LAN influences behavior and neuronal plasticity and that this effect is likely mediated by ipRGCs. Modern sources of LAN that contain blue wavelengths may be particularly disruptive to the circadian system, potentially contributing to altered mood regulation.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. Bedrosian.2@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0270-6474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23926261 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 27  
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Author Kloog, I.; Portnov, B.A.; Rennert, H.S.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does the modern urbanized sleeping habitat pose a breast cancer risk? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume (down) 28 Issue 1 Pages 76-80  
  Keywords Human Health; ged; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sleep; Urbanization  
  Abstract Due to its disruptive effects on circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation at night, shiftworking is currently recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). As revealed by the present analysis based on a comparative case-control study of 1679 women, exposure to light-at-night (LAN) in the “sleeping habitat” is significantly associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.118-1.311; p < .001), controlling for education, ethnicity, fertility, and alcohol consumption. The novelty of the present research is that, to the best of the authors' knowledge, it is the first study to have identified an unequivocal positive association between bedroom-light intensity and BC risk. Thus, according to the results of the present study, not only should artificial light exposure in the working environment be considered as a potential risk factor for BC, but also LAN in the “sleeping habitat.”  
  Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21182407 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 770  
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Author Hölker, F.; Wolter, C.; Perkin, E.K.; Tockner, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution as a biodiversity threat Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 12 Pages 681-682  
  Keywords *Biodiversity; Biological Clocks; Biological Evolution; Ecosystem; *Environmental Monitoring; *Environmental Pollutants; Light/*adverse effects  
  Abstract  
  Address  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21035893 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 36  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Erren, T.C.; Fuentes-Broto, L.; Paredes, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-mediated perturbations of circadian timing and cancer risk: a mechanistic analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume (down) 8 Issue 4 Pages 354-360  
  Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Melatonin/antagonists & inhibitors; Neoplasms/*etiology/physiopathology; Risk Factors; Sleep Deprivation/complications; oncogenesis  
  Abstract In industrialized countries, certain types of cancer, most notably, breast and prostate, are more frequent than in poorly developed nations. This high cancer frequency is not explained by any of the conventional causes. Within the past decade, numerous reports have appeared that link light at night with an elevated cancer risk. The three major consequences of light at night are sleep deprivation, chronodisruption, and melatonin suppression. Each of these individually or in combination may contribute to the reported rise in certain types of cancer. In this article, the potential mechanisms underlying the basis of the elevated cancer risk are briefly discussed. Finally, if cancer is a consequence of excessive nighttime light, it is likely that other diseases/conditions may also be exaggerated by the widespread use of light after darkness onset.  
  Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20042411 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 290  
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