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Author Dobler, G.; Ghandehari, M.; Koonin, S.E.; Sharma, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Hyperspectral Survey of New York City Lighting Technology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal (down) Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 16 Issue 12 Pages 2047  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation; Lighting  
  Abstract Using side-facing observations of the New York City (NYC) skyline, we identify lighting technologies via spectral signatures measured with Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging. The instrument is a scanning, single slit spectrograph with 872 spectral channels from 0.4-1.0 mu m. With a single scan, we are able to clearly match the detected spectral signatures of 13 templates of known lighting types. However, many of the observed lighting spectra do not match those that have been measured in the laboratory. We identify unknown spectra by segmenting our observations and using Template-Activated Partition (TAP) clustering with a variety of underlying unsupervised clustering methods to generate the first empirically-determined spectral catalog of roughly 40 urban lighting types. We show that, given our vantage point, we are able to determine lighting technology use for both interior and exterior lighting. Finally, we find that the total brightness of our scene shows strong peaks at the 570 nm Na – II , 595 nm Na – II and 818 nm Na – I lines that are common in high pressure sodium lamps, which dominate our observations.  
  Address NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress, 1 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA. mohit.sharma@nyu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27929391 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1567  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Garratt, M.J.; Jenkins, S.R.; Davies, T.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping the consequences of artificial light at night for intertidal ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal (down) Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 691 Issue Pages 760-768  
  Keywords Ecology; Lighting  
  Abstract Widespread coastal urbanization has resulted in artificial light pollution encroaching into intertidal habitats, which are highly valued by society for ecosystem services including coastal protection, climate regulation and recreation. While the impacts of artificial light at night in terrestrial and riparian ecosystems are increasingly well documented, those on organisms that reside in coastal intertidal habitats are less well explored. The distribution of artificial light at night from seaside promenade lighting was mapped across a sandy shore, and its consequences for macroinvertebrate community structure quantified accounting for other collinear environmental variables known to shape biodiversity in intertidal ecosystems (shore height, wave exposure and organic matter content). Macroinvertebrate community composition significantly changed along artificial light gradients. Greater numbers of species and total community biomass were observed with increasing illumination, a relationship that was more pronounced (increased effects size) with increasing organic matter availability. Individual taxa exhibited different relationships with artificial light illuminance; the abundances of 27% of non-rare taxa [including amphipods (Amphipoda), catworms (Nephtys spp.), and sand mason worms (Lanice conchilega)] decreased with increasing illumination, while 20% [including tellins (Tellinidae spp.), lugworms (Arenicola marina) and ragworms (Nereididae spp.)] increased. Possible causes of these relationships are discussed, including direct effects of artificial light on macroinvertebrate behaviour and indirect effects via trophic interactions. With increasing light pollution in coastal zones around the world, larger scale changes in intertidal ecosystems could be occurring.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2590  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Skeldon, A.C.; Phillips, A.J.K.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of self-selected light-dark cycles and social constraints on human sleep and circadian timing: a modeling approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages 45158  
  Keywords human health, lighting  
  Abstract Why do we go to sleep late and struggle to wake up on time? Historically, light-dark cycles were dictated by the solar day, but now humans can extend light exposure by switching on artificial lights. We use a mathematical model incorporating effects of light, circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis to provide a quantitative theoretical framework to understand effects of modern patterns of light consumption on the human circadian system. The model shows that without artificial light humans wakeup at dawn. Artificial light delays circadian rhythmicity and preferred sleep timing and compromises synchronisation to the solar day when wake-times are not enforced. When wake-times are enforced by social constraints, such as work or school, artificial light induces a mismatch between sleep timing and circadian rhythmicity ('social jet-lag'). The model implies that developmental changes in sleep homeostasis and circadian amplitude make adolescents particularly sensitive to effects of light consumption. The model predicts that ameliorating social jet-lag is more effectively achieved by reducing evening light consumption than by delaying social constraints, particularly in individuals with slow circadian clocks or when imposed wake-times occur after sunrise. These theory-informed predictions may aid design of interventions to prevent and treat circadian rhythm-sleep disorders and social jet-lag.  
  Address University of Surrey, Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Guildford, GU2 7XP, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28345624 Approved no  
  Call Number SU @ spitschan @ Serial 1638  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yoon, H.C.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, S.; Park, J.B.; Do, Y.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian-tunable Perovskite Quantum Dot-based Down-Converted Multi-Package White LED with a Color Fidelity Index over 90 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2808  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract New metrics of the color and circadian performances of down-converted white light-emitting diodes (DC-WLEDs) are rapidly becoming popular in smart lighting systems. This is due to the increased desire for accurate analytical methods to measure the effects of newly developed quantum dot (QD)-based lighting on the vision, color, and circadian sensors of retina cells in the human eye. In this regard, a two-measure system known as technical memorandum TM-30-2015 (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America), encompassing the color fidelity index (CFI, R f ) and the color gamut index (CGI, R g ), has been developed as a new metrics of color to replace the currently utilized color rendering index (CRI, R a ). In addition, the tunability of the circadian efficacy of radiation (CER) is now more important due to its effect on the control of melatonin suppression/secretion, resetting of the central/local clocks of individuals given their daily cycles, and benefits to human health. In this paper, we developed and analyzed six-colored perovskite (Pe; cyan, green, yellowish green, amber, orange, and red colors) QDs-based multi-package WLED, and optimized the SPDs of tunable PeQD-based multi-package WLEDs in terms of promising human-centric lighting device, given its optimized visual energy, color qualities and health-promoting effects.  
  Address Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Seoul, 136-702, Republic of Korea. yrdo@kookmin.ac.kr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28584229; PMCID:PMC5459832 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1667  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, J.; Ding, X.; Hong, C.; Pang, Y.; Chen, L.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Xin, H.; Wang, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Several biological benefits of the low color temperature light-emitting diodes based normal indoor lighting source Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 7560  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Currently, light pollution has become a nonnegligible issue in our daily life. Artificial light sources with high color temperature were deem to be the major pollution source, which could induce several adverse effects on human's health. In our previous research, we have firstly developed an artificial indoor light with low color temperature (1900 K). However, the biological effects of this artificial light on human's health are unclear. Here, four artificial lights (1900 K, 3000 K, 4000 K and 6600 K) were used to evaluate some biological changes in both human (in total 152 person-times) and murine models. Compared with other three high color temperature artificial lights, our lights (1900 K) presented a positive effect on promoting the secreting of melatonin and glutamate, protecting human's eyes, accelerating would healing and hair regeneration. These systematical studies indicated that the proposed low color temperature (1900 K) light could provide several significant benefits in human's daily life.  
  Address The National Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Drugs and the Technologies, Institute of Translational Medicine, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 330031, China. wangxiaolei@ncu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31101840 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2501  
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